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World Physiotherapy Day 2020

Posted on 7th September 2020 by

World Physiotherapy Day is held every year on 8 September, the day the World Confederation for Physical Therapy was founded in 1951. It is a day when physiotherapists can promote the profession to:

  • Showcase the significant role the profession makes to the health and wellbeing of the global population
  • Raise the profile of the profession
  • Campaign on behalf of the profession and its patients to governments and policy makers

The day marks the unity and solidarity of the physiotherapy community around the world. It is an opportunity to recognise the work that physiotherapists do for their patients and community!

The focus for this year’s World Physiotherapy Day is rehabilitation after COVID-19 and the role of physiotherapists in the treatment and management of people affected by COVID-19.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages:

  1. Exercise can play an important part in a person’s recovery from COVID-19
  2. As the experts in movement, physiotherapists can guide people in how exercise can help recovery
  3. People who have had severe cases of COVID-19 will need rehabilitation and physiotherapy to recover from the effects of treatment for the disease
  4. Using telehealth can help people access support from a physiotherapist to help them manage the impact of COVID-19
  5. Telehealth can be as effective as conventional healthcare methods to improve physical function

Exercise

Exercise is an important part of your recovery from COVID-19, paced to match your needs. As experts in movement and exercise, physiotherapists can guide you in how exercise can help:

  • improve fitness
  • reduce breathlessness
  • increase muscle strength
  • improve balance and coordination
  • improve your thinking
  • reduce stress and improve mood
  • increase confidence
  • improve your energy

Whether or not you’ve had COVID-19, many people may be wary of re-starting exercise or don’t know where to start.

You may have had COVID-19 and are not yet feeling physically ready to exercise, you may have been shielding or isolating for the past few months or you may have lost all your confidence as a result of lockdown.

As Physio’s, we can really hold your hand and guide you back into exercise in a very careful and supportive way. With our training and knowledge, we have the unique combination of skills that allow us to integrate and consider not only the best way to achieve the health benefits of exercise, but also your recovery from illness, pain and injury.

Here at goPhysio, in addition to 1-2-1 Physiotherapy or Sports Therapy, we have created a dedicated rehabilitation space, known as The Strong Room, from where we can gently guide and support you in regaining strength and rebuilding exercise habits. Our 1-2-1 exercise rehabilitation service is totally tailored to you, your aims and goals. We also offer both mat and Reformer Pilates, either 1-2-1 or small classes.

Telehealth

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a huge shift in how physiotherapists worked. Lockdown meant we were unable to see people in person (face to face), but pain and injuries didn’t stop and people still needed our help. So, we were able to embrace technology and offer support through online channels (aka Telehealth, Virtual, online, eHealth……..)

What is telehealth?

Telehealth or eHealth is the use of electronic communications to share medical information to improve a person’s health.

We are still offering the option of online physiotherapy and also Pilates at goPhysio, however, most people that we are booking in or need our help, are desperate to have the personal contact and benefits of face to face or in person appointments. Whilst Telehealth has experienced a huge surge and is undoubtedly here to stay, it has it’s limitations. Read more about our thoughts on this on a recent blog here.

Did you know?

Post Viral fatigue syndrome Up to 10% of people recovering from COVID-19 may develop post viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). If you feel you are not improving, or if activity is making you feel much worse, speak to your physiotherapist or healthcare practitioner and ask them to assess you for PVFS. The rehabilitation of people with PVFS requires different management strategies.

Some resources and further information

An exercise plan to help your COVID-19 recovery

Your recovery after severe illness with COVID-19

Accessing rehabilitation with telehealth

#worldptday



World Physical Therapy Day – What Inspires goPhysio’s Physios?

Posted on 8th September 2018 by

For this years World Physical Therapy Day we asked our team of Physiotherapists, what inspires them? 

World Physical Therapy Day 2018

First up, our Clinical Director and founder of goPhysio, Paul Baker

1. Why did you decide to become a Physio?

I was really interested in biology at school, fascinated in injuries and was relatively sporty. I wanted a practical job, to work with my hands and help people. I never fancied  working in an office or hospital, and I wanted the opportunity to have my own business, like my Dad did! So, Physio and having my own practice ticked all the boxes for me and it still does 23 yrs later!

2. What do you love the most about your job as a Physio?

Helping a wide variety of different people solve their injury problems and getting them backto their hobbies and goals!

3. What’s your proudest moment as a Physio?

Opening our new modern bespoke physiotherapy clinic in 2017! that was some journey!! 

Paul graduated from The University of the West of England, Bristol in 1997.

Next up, Roz Brawn

1. Why did you decide to become a Physio?

Having been a gymnast I’ve always been interested in how the human body works from a musculoskeletal perspective and what the human body is capable of achieving.

2. What do you love the most about your job as a Physio?

No two days are the same and you never know how each day is going to develop.  Being able to work each day with people, making a difference and helping them achieve their goals.

3. What’s your proudest moment as a Physio?

Being part of the Great Britain Olympic Team and watching the athletes I have worked with, through all the hours of training and sacrifice, realise their dreams.

Hugo Carvalheiro

1. Why did you decide to become a Physio?

I wanted a profession where I could help people and see the results, a profession where every day would be different, a profession where I would meet and communicate with different people, a profession where I would need to update my knowledge frequently.

2. What do you love the most about your job as a Physio?

I can help people achieve their goals and change their lives.

3. What’s your proudest moment as a Physio?

The moment I helped a paraplegic stand on his feet and walk with lower limb orthotics and crutches.

Chris Tiley

1. Why did you decide to become a physio?

When I was doing my GCSE’s I started to think about potential careers that I would like to pursue.  Physiotherapy was suggested to me and the more I looked into it the more it appealed to me.  I liked the idea that I would be helping people and make a difference to their lives.  I liked how varied the different jobs are within physiotherapy, ranging from the acute hospital setting up to dealing with elite athletes and everything in between.

2. What do you love most about your job as a physiotherapist?

I love being able to interact with lots of different people throughout my day and the challenges that brings with adapting my approach to each person’s different situations.  No two patients present the same, even if they are coming in with the same condition. This makes each day different and varied and makes it even more rewarding when helping people achieve each of their goals.

3. What is your proudest moment as a physiotherapist?

My proudest moment as a physiotherapist is being involved with British ParaSnowsport for 2 seasons.  Although I did not go with them to the Paralympics, I am proud to have treated 2 Paralympic gold medallists as well as silver and bronze medallists in the run up to the games.

Kim Leith

1. Why did you decide to become a Physio?

My Uncle has Multiple Sclerosis and has been in a wheelchair as long as I can remember. I always found it amazing to see how much more mobility and function he had after his Physiotherapy sessions. I also wanted to do something medical as a job, but I’m far too squeamish to be a Nurse or a Doctor!

2. What do you love the most about your job as a Physio?

The problem solving aspect – each patient is like a puzzle when they first arrive and through the assessment you can identify the cause for their pain or problem. Being able to give someone an answer and a reason for why they feel like they do is often the first big step on the road to recovery.

3. What’s your proudest moment as a Physio?

Helping people achieve their goals, no matter how big or small.

All of our team of Physiotherapists are members of The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists and registered with The Health Care Professions Council, ensuring regulation, high quality standards of care and professionalism.

HCPC goPhysio The Chartered Society of physiotherapists

 

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World Physical Therapy Day 2018

Posted on 8th September 2018 by

World Physical Therapy Day takes place every year on 8th September. The day is an opportunity for Physiotherapists (physical therapists) from all over the world to raise awareness about the crucial contribution the profession makes to keeping people well, mobile and independent.

Get Active. Stay Active. Talk to one of our Physiotherapists today.

The campaign message of World Physical Therapy Day 2018 is “Physical therapy and mental health”, demonstrating the role that physical therapy and physical activity has in mental health.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages:

  • Exercise as an evidence-based treatment for depression.
  • The role of physical therapists working with patients who may have mental health issues.
  • The benefits of physical activity in protecting against the emergence of depression.
  • How better outcomes are experienced when exercise is delivered by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist.
  • How people with mental health issues are more at risk of having poor physical health.

Here are some great infographics that summarise how mental health can be improved with exercise and the crucial role physiotherapists can have in supporting this.

World Physio Day 2018

World Physio Day mental health

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World Physical Therapy Day 2017

Posted on 8th September 2017 by

Today, 8th September is World Physical Therapy Day. The day is an opportunity for Physiotherapists from all over the world to raise awareness about the crucial contribution the profession makes to keeping people well, mobile and independent.

The overarching theme for World Physical Therapy Day each year is ‘Movement for Health’. This year, the message is “Physical activity for life”, highlighting the important role that physiotherapists play in healthy ageing.

There are well evidenced guidelines for the amount of recommended physical activity for adults aged 18–64. Physical activity includes leisure time physical activity (for example: walking, dancing, gardening, hiking, swimming), transportation (e.g. walking or cycling), occupational (i.e. work), household chores, play, games, sports or planned exercise, in the context of daily, family, and community activities.

In order to improve cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, bone health, reduce the risk of NCDs and depression:

  • Adults aged 18–64 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Aerobic activity should be performed in bouts of at least 10 minutes duration.
  • For additional health benefits, adults should increase their moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes per week, or engage in 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Muscle-strengthening activities should be done involving major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week.

Why do Physiotherapists play such an important role in supporting physical activity?

We play a crucial role in both keeping and improving people’s activity levels. “If you’re injured or in pain, the first thing people tend to do is rest” says goPhysio’s Clinical Director, Paul Baker. “GP’s often use this as their first line of advice. But rest isn’t always the best way to recover from an injury. We aim to help people stay as active as they can whilst they recover – be it alternative activities or modifications.”

“People often get scared to move if they’re in pain, so we reassure people and give them the confidence that movement is OK. When this is done early on, it prevents so many potential secondary issues evolving.”

“We also help and encourage people to try things that they may not think possible, particularly the older section of patients we see.”

Our Positive Steps classes for example are specifically designed for over 60’s, so they can gain confidence exercising in a friendly, supportive environment. We also offer a range of Clinical Pilates classes, great for improving strength and balance. Everything we offer at goPhysio is led by clinical experts, so they are in the unique position of bering able to focus not only on fitness and wellbeing but also combining this with knowledge and expertise in injury and health conditions.Physical activity guide

 

If you’d like to improve your physical activities, but are limited by pain, injury or confidence, then please do get in touch to find out how we could help you.

#Worldptday