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Helping Young People during Lockdown

Posted on 11th May 2020 by

We are entering week 8 of lockdown, meaning week 8 of home schooling, kids not getting out with their friends, no formal social or sporting activities or hobbies.

How are you coping? Are the kids running you ragged? Has healthy eating and exercise gone out the window completely?

Fear not, we have a few handy ideas to kick start motivations once again!

It can be hard for our bodies and routines to adjust to such a change like the current global pandemic. It’s important, especially for younger members of the family, to introduce a new routine into daily life to keep stress levels low and energy levels high. You may be facing an increased number of stressors and tensions may be riding particularly high. In spite of this, it’s helpful for family units to come together to work through their problems. Try to be mindful of how others are feeling and to be more forgiving if they need to explode, cry or simply hide away.

When we’re feeling down, we often turn to sugary foods to help give us an energy boost. However, this can have a negative effect as the sugar rush may not last long and could potentially crash lower than we were before. Its good to look for energy in carbohydrates, especially complex carbs, such as sweet potato, wholegrain breads, lentils, parsnips or butternut squash. They have a slower release to help keep energy levels higher for longer.

One way to get younger family members eating the right foods is to include them in meal planning and preparation. They’ll have a sense of achievement and is a nice break from any home schooling also. Or, you could class it as a Food Tech class… two birds with one stone.

London Sport has an exhaustive list of ways to get kids up and active at home. Current Government advice is daily exercise to help the public get fresh air during lockdown, but we don’t always want to exercise. Their list gives you extensive areas of other ways to keep fit and healthy from the comfort of your own home; whether its alongside The Nations PE teacher, Joe Wicks, or Sport Englands campaign with Disney to create fun dance routines. 

We’re often bombarded by negative messages or thoughts from tabloids and social media, so its important to look for ways to keep spirits high from all the technology we have at our disposal. Zoom quizzes have been very popular in recent weeks, and are a great way to catch up with friends of family. You can also find a whole host of online games and entertainment which loved ones can participate in with you across the internet. They’ll introduce enjoyment and pleasure back to this ‘new normal’ and give younger people another element to a daily routine.

Here’s some great ideas:

Weird & wonderful ways to get through lockdown

Free online, boredom-busting resources!

Don’t forget yourself too!

But, lockdown isn’t always about looking after others before yourself. You still need to make time for you. Listen to a podcast, read a book, enjoy the sun; make time for yourself to relax and reflect on the current situation. Self care is so important in order to look after others. Some of the our favourite podcasts are:

Happy Place – Fearne Cotton

Food for Thought – Rhiannon Lambert

Run Pod – Jenni Falconer

That Peter Crouch Podcast – BBC Sounds

Give me Strength – Alice Living

Castaway – Laura Whitmore

When thinking about your current situation it’s helpful to:

  1. Acknowledge and accept that this is how things are at the moment (this is your new ‘normal’ and you can’t push it away or make it disappear). Think about what’s in your control and what is outside of your control.
  2. Find a way to allow yourself to feel all the things that this new normal brings up (it’s OK to feel cross, frustrated, sad, angry and any other associated emotion).
  3. Find ways to do your best within the situation (are there any positives for example, are you getting to do anything which you wouldn’t normally be able to do?).
  4. Stay in the moment rather than regretting the past or worrying about the future. We will be thinking more about this process in the next Step.

Hopefully, we’ll be able to find a sense of normality soon be connect with loved ones properly. There are of course, further online guides on how to cope during lockdown. Support wesbites such as Mind, Family Lives and Young Minds are charities that offer support, knowledge and advice so if you are struggling, please speak to someone. 



Lessons from Life Lessons Festival

Posted on 17th February 2020 by

This weekend, I was lucky enough to be able to spend 2 days at the inaugural thought-led wellbeing event, Life Lessons, in London.

A jam packed weekend, there was a line up of world class speakers planned, grappling with topics such as philosophy, society, the mind, self-care, sustainability, psychology, nutrition and more.

goPhysio’s services centre around physical health, however, what’s becoming more and more evident and thankfully, more and more recognised, is that crucial connection between the mind and the body that can not be overlooked.

So, I thought I’d share some of the key messages from the weekend.

Saturday kicked off with Alain De Botton, from The School of Life, exploring emotional health. In fact, this happened to be my favourite lecture of the weekend, so a good one to start with. The School of Life is a global organisation helping people live more fulfilled lives. The key messages from Alan were:

  • We have become intolerant of anything other than perfection. The world has become radically unbalanced towards perfectionism. It’s what we expect, when actually we can be good enough, we don’t have to be perfect. An understanding and acceptance of this for both ourselves and others, would really be transformational.
  • We are all ‘weird’! There is no ‘normal’, we’re just different types of weird!!
  • There is no longer any time for deep thinking. We used to sit on the bus or in the car, daydream in the shower or during a walk. These times of deep thinking allowed our brains to process things and thoughts. But now we are in an era of information overload. We are constantly consuming, be it podcasts, TV, audiobooks, social media, 24 hour news, radio, the internet or books. Our minds don’t have any time to process anything!
  • This information overload stops us from ‘thinking’ in the day. A potential result of this is that at night, when our mind finally gets a break from information, the minds starts to go into thinking overdrive and can really disrupt our sleep (sound familiar?!).
  • We would all benefit from connecting with nature more. This connection, experiencing and acknowledging how ‘small’ humans are relative to the world, can really help to centre us.

Next up, was ‘Everything is figureoutable’ by Marie Forleo. She shared her 3 rules:

  1. All your problems and dreams are figureoutable
  2. If they aren’t figureoutable, it’s not a problem or a dream, it’s a fact of life, or
  3. You may just not care enough to figure it out. If so, find something else.

Her message was all about having self-belief, in that you have to believe you have what it takes to make things happen.

According to Maria, you are 42% more likely to achieve a goal if you write it down. So, if there’s something you are really serious about acheiving something, why not give it a go.


I am already a fan of Dr Rangan Chatterjee, so was delighted to hear him speak to Helen Russell and Mungi Ngomane. They discussed some fascinating ways in which different cultures and parts of the world achieve happiness!

These included Ubuntu, the art of human connection. The philosophy of “I am only because you are” and acknowledging that everyone impacts on your life seems extremely powerful. We seem to have all become too individualised. They also discussed the Japanese terms; Wabisabi, a view centred on the acceptance of transience and imperfection and Ikigi, a reason for being, encompassing joy, a sense of purpose and meaning and a feeling of well-being.

The key takeaway message was that we need to live well to be well. It’s almost come full circle, in that we are starting to get back to basics again and realising that these are the important things for wellbeing – eating well, sleeping well, exercising, connecting, talking, relaxing, reducing time on technology and getting into nature.


To finish off day 1, the very hilarious Romesh Ranganathan, was joined by a panel of very honest and open men, to discuss mental health. In light of the day’s news, of another unnecessary and early tragic loss of life of someone in the media, the discussion was very apt. Their messages all followed the same themes:

  1. Talk & listen more – we have to be having conversations and connecting with people
  2. Ask people of they’re OK and watch out for others
  3. You never know what people are going through or how they are really feeling, so have this in your mind

Day 2 started with an honest and frank discussion entitled “Wonderwomen at Work”. As the title suggested, this was all about the role, challenges and culture surrounding women at work. My favourite message in this talk was not to worry whether people actually like you. Just like you don’t necessarily like everyone, everyone won’t like you. But be nice, kind and likeable, and that’s all you can do!


The Brain Power talk was a much more scientifically focused session, which covered the impact of alcohol and smart drugs on brain power and steps we can take to boost brain power and future proof our brain function as we age.

So, what can we do to future-proof our brain?

  • Exercise
  • Eat a well balanced diet
  • Sleep well
  • Practice positive affirmations (a few talks mentioned this)
  • Meditate, learn a new skill or do something regularly that requires concentration

Not rocket science is it?! The things we should be doing to love well and improve our chances of living a long and happy life, are all pretty much the same! Chartered Psychologist Kimberley Wilson has a new book out soon (see the cover below for the details) and it sounds fascinating.


Anyone who has kids must have heard of Philipa Perry and her book that’s packed full of wisdom. She certainly lived up to expectations in person. She just talks sense! Her key messages when you’re dealing with your children (although I’m sure they could equally apply to communicating and interacting with anyone):

  1. Connection NOT Correction – find the mood of the person you’re interacting with, don’t deal with the facts. Try and connect with them.
  2. Provide boundaries & love. Teach emotional intelligence by demonstrating it and sharing your feelings.

Her book is an absolute must read!


The weekend was also peppered with yoga & barre classes, guided meditation and drop in sessions and discussions covering a huge range of topics, from overcoming anxiety to connecting your mind and body through exercise.

It really was a fascinating and inspiring weekend, with many takeaways that will undoubtedly be woven into not only my personal life but also what we provide here at goPhysio – so watch this space!

I’ll certainly be looking out for this event again.



#Lifelessonsfestival


Health matters: physical activity – prevention and management of long-term conditions, new guidance published

Posted on 29th January 2020 by

Public Health England has just launched a new publication Health matters: physical activity – prevention and management of long-term conditions

There are undeniably SO many benefits of being more active. These include:

  1. Reducing the risk of many long-term conditions
  2. Helping manage existing conditions
  3. Ensuring good musculoskeletal health
  4. Developing and maintaining physical and mental function and independence
  5. Supporting social inclusion
  6. Helping maintain a healthy weight

One in 3 adults in England live with a long-term health condition, such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer or a neurological disorder. These people are twice as likely to be amongst the least physically active. However, evidence shows that regular physical activity can help prevent or manage many common conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It can also help with many of the symptoms of these long-term conditions and prevent further complications or problems developing.

What we love about the new publications, is the focus is becoming more about PHYSICAL ACTIVITY and not just exercise. Exercise is only one way of being physically active, so it’s great to see more attention being paid to this.

So, what constitutes PHYSICAL ACTIVITY?

  • Active living – so going about your daily life more actively! Getting out for a walk, sitting less, gardening or household chores, even going shopping can be fairly active (particularly when you compare it to internet shopping!!).
  • Active travelling – getting on your bike, walking, getting off the bus a stop earlier and thinking twice before hopping in the car – great for the planet too!
  • Active recreation – getting out to walk the dog, a social walk or cycle with friends, trying a new activity like climbing, bouldering or dry slop skiing!
  • Active Sport – Either informal, a game of rounders at the park, a kick around in the garden or a go on your kid’s trampoline. Or organised sport such as playing as part of a team, going to an exercise class or taking part in an event.

So, what should we be doing?

The guidelines state that for good physical and mental health, adults should aim to be physically active every day. Any activity is better than none, and more is better still.

There are 3 elements of the physical activity guidelines:

  1. Strengthening activity – Muscle strength, bone health and the ability to balance are crucial to physical function. It is important that strengthening activities are important throughout your life for different reasons.
  2. Cardiovascular activity – A combination of moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity activity is recommended.
  3. Sedentary time – Adults should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and should break up long periods of inactivity with at least light physical activity.

With a bit of creativity, lateral thinking, small changes to your daily routines and habits, it is easy to increase the levels of physical activity in your life.

You simply can not argue with the potential benefits to your health and wellness. If activity were a ‘medicine’ it would be a miracle! So, how can you not find the time or a way?!

How can we help?

Increasing physical activity is woven into everything we do at goPhysio.

  1. If you’re in pain or injured, one of the consequences is that you are unable to be as physically active as you’d like to be or should be. By helping reduce your pain and helping you recover from your injury fast, we’ll get you back to being active again! Our Physio or Sports Therapy team are on hand to quickly and accurately assess and diagnose your injury. We’ll put in place a realistic recovery plan. No GP referral is needed and we aim to offer appointments within 24 hours, so you don’t need to face any delays. Book your appointment online here.
  2. If you’re approaching your latter years, we offer a specialised exercise class for those 60+, designed exactly to target the recommended guidelines above. Positive Steps runs on a Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday from 11am – 12pm. Your first class is free, so just give us a call to book in a taster class.
  3. We run a comprehensive exercise based rehab service. This is a great way to build and develop strength, recover from a new or recurrent injury and help prevent injuries by getting your body stronger. Read more about rehab here.
  4. Pilates is a wonderful gentle way to exercise, that can be adapted for all ages and abilities. It works on strength, flexibility and balance and also gives some mental space and focus, with time to invest and focus on yourself. We run 20 classes a week in Chandlers Ford and offer flexible options for bookings. You can read all about our Pilates classes here.

Whatever you love to do, we’re here to help and support you in staying active and getting more active, so you can live an active, healthy, positive life, pain & injury free.

#LoveActivity



On Your Feet Britain 2019

Posted on 1st March 2019 by

There’s no denying it, we’re sitting more and moving less and this is causing havoc on our health and wellbeing.

Things have to change, attitudes have to change, understanding has to change, workplace cultures have to change and lifestyles have to change.

That’s why, since it started, we’ve promoted and supported On Your Feet Britain and their #SitLess #Move More campaign.

Take a look and see whether you can get your workplace involved?

Awareness of the “Sitting Disease” has rocket up in recent years. Surely it’s time your workplace joined in our fun event to take James Brown at his word.

Join 2 million office workers #SitLess and #MoveMore by signing up your workplace to a free event and see a different aspect of your colleagues. Find out who is The Wiggler, The Wag- gler, The Mover or The Groover.

On 26th April 2019 we’re challenging the nation again to get On Your Feet. Take part in our fifth national day when 2 million workers across Britain will sit less & move more.

Instead of emailing the person oppo- site, do something revolutionary – walk over & talk face to face. It’s a good way to do business & it’ll do you good.

  • Ditch your usual lunch ‘al desko’ and take a stroll outside. You’ll get a spring in your step and feel better for it.
  • Make phone calls standing up. You’ll feel more confident and burn more calories than sitting.
  • Why not take it on as an office chal- lange & free yourself from the office chair for the day. Find fun & easy ideas online to take part.

Sign up today at:

onyourfeet.org.uk

@getGBstanding

facebook.com/getbritainstanding

You can read mote about active working here:

Active Working Tips – Drink more water

Active Working Tips – Dress to impress

Active Working Tips – Easy desk exercises

Looking after yourself when working from home

UK Businesses are failing the health needs of their office staff



National Parks Week

Posted on 25th July 2018 by

This week is National Parks Week – an annual National Park family festival championing all that is unique and special about National Parks. This year’s festival takes National Parks Week place Sunday 22 to Sunday 29 July and celebrates the countless opportunities to get outside and discover the length and breadth of the UK’s 15 National Parks.

How lucky are we to have one of these treasures right on our doorstep with The New Forest!

And what great timing, being the summer holidays and having such glorious summer weather!

Getting out in the great outdoors is so good for us in so many ways! 

  • Time to disconnect from technology and connect with nature. The kids may moan and groan about being dragged away from ‘Fortnite’ initially, but it’s often worth the extra effort and persuasion! Get back to basics – climb a tree, find sticks, feel that sunshine on your face!
  • Walking, climbing, exploring – all fantastic ways to get some physical activity into the day. Getting out in the fresh air will help you feel more energised, wake up those muscles & joints and get your heart and lungs pumping if you get your stride on!
  • Bringing families together – time to chat and a low cost holiday activity, why not organise a family walk & picnic (find a nice shady spot!). A spot of rounders or cricket always goes down well too.

Don’t forget, in this unprecedented stretch of hot weather we’ve been having to follow the recommended advice about staying safe in this heat.

  • Drink plenty of water as sugary, alcoholic and caffeinated drinks can make you more dehydrated
  • Try to keep out of the sun between 11am to 3pm
  • Take care and follow local safety advice, if you are going into the water to cool down
  • Walk in the shade, apply sunscreen and wear a hat, if you have to go out in the heat
  • Avoid physical exertion in the hottest parts of the day
  • Wear light, loose fitting cotton clothes
  • Make sure you take water with you, if you are travelling

Read More

Taking time to be mindful

Active 10 – 10 Steps to An Active You

#NationalParksWeek #DiscoverNationalParks #LoveActivity


 

 

 


Taking time to be mindful

Posted on 27th June 2018 by

We often seem to live our lives at a million miles per hour and sometimes let our days fly by, almost unconscious of what we are doing or have done. Mindfulness has become ever increasingly popular, with our awareness of the importance of our mental health and wellbeing on the rise. 

So, what is mindfulness and how can you incorporate it into your busy schedule?

Mindfulness can be defined in different ways. Ultimately, it’s the ability to focus on the present moment whilst accepting ones’s feeling, thoughts and how your body feels. Alternatively defined as;

“Bringing one’s complete attention to the present experience on a moment-to-moment basis’’

(Marlatt & Kristeller, 1999).

Mindfulness and meditation can have many positive affects on the body including:

  • Higher brain functioning with boosts to the working memory
  • Lowered blood pressure 
  • Lowered anxiety levels
  • Increased attention and focus
  • Reduction in stress

So how can we put this into practice to get all the great benefits mentioned above?

Here’s a few practical ideas:

  • At breakfast: stop watching the clock, smell your food, take note of the colour, the texture the taste. 
  • Brushing your teeth:  the taste of the toothpaste, the sensation of the brush on your teeth, the texture under your feet as you stand there. 
  • Walking: put your phone or device away. What can you hear? What can you smell? How does the sunshine feel on your skin?
  • Meditation: use an app to get you started with mindfulness, we recommend Headspace or Calm, which have guided meditation and can only take ten minutes of your day. 
  • Pilates: take some time out and join a pilates class, connecting your mind and body. Yoga is also great for this.
  • Go for a walk in nature: Walking its great for taking some time out and being mindful.It helps you connect with the season and stimulates all your senses.

Take time to be mindful

by Francesca Wicker, Sports Therapist


Love activity, Hate exercise? Do more of what you love with Physio!

Posted on 12th June 2018 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists has launched a new campaign, Love activity, Hate Love activity hate exercsie posterexercise?

It is well documented that physical inactivity is a major public health problem. This campaign sets about to help identify barriers that prevent people from being more active. It also highlights what a positive influence as Physio’s can have in promoting and supporting physical activity at every touch point.

As a team of Physiotherapists, Pilates Instructors, Sports Therapists & Sports Massage Practitioners, we all have an important role to play in promoting physical activity. We want to maximise the opportunities to discuss the benefits of physical activity and any barriers to it with our patients, and make exercise more accessible to a wider range of people.

goPhysio’s Clinical Director, Paul, says “It doesn’t have to be ‘exercise’ per se, ‘activity’ is what is great! It’s about keeping it simple, finding things that you enjoy doing that get you moving and challenge you physically. So, gardening, walking, playing tennis with friends, marathon running, taking the stairs instead of the lift, even pushing a trolley round the supermarket, they all count! That’s what’s great about this campaign, even if the term ‘exercise’ frightens you, you don’t need to be afraid of being active!”

Do more of what you love with physio is such a great term. It’s exactly what we do – help make sure you can do more of what you love doing!

So whether that’s physio or sports therapy treatment to help you recover from an injury, Pilates to help improve and maintain your physical wellbeing or Positive Steps elderly exercise classes, we run a host of services from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, Hampshire, that  help you do more of what you love.

So, what are the tips to getting started if you love activity but hate exercise?

  1. Find something you enjoy so that you’ll keep going.
  2. Set goals for yourself – big or small – to keep you motivated.
  3. Pace yourself – start slowly and gradually build up.
  4. It’s OK to ache but if pain persists, ease back and go slower.
  5. Need more motivation and support? Find someone join you!

If you need any help or support or just don’t know where to start, just get in touch. Our friendly and supportive team are here to help you.

 


Blue Monday

Posted on 14th January 2018 by

Blue MondayBlue Monday is a name given to a day in January (typically the third Monday of the month) claimed to be the most depressing day of the year. This year it’s Monday 15th January 2018.

However, knowing it’s coming up, you could make a conscious effort to set out and enjoy it – in different ways perhaps, but just as much as you would enjoy a warm summer’s day. How can that be possible?

Well, it’s really is up to you whether you exist in a prison on Blue Monday, or you enjoy yourself. If you prefer the latter, our suggestion is simple: exercise.

Aerobic exercise, any steady movement you enjoy—walking, jogging, swimming, cycling—boosts endorphins, and will leave you feeling calmer and happier.

To stay healthy, adults should do 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity every week. If you haven’t exercised for a while, gradually introduce physical activity into your daily routine. Any exercise is better than none. Even a 15-minute walk can clear your mind and relax.

And after that, who wouldn’t like a massage? Treat yourself and add a therapeutic massage to your routine. You’ll feel, look and simply be healthier far into the future. It’ll promote a faster healing of strained muscles and sprained ligaments; reducing pain and swelling as well as formation of excessive scar tissue

Make your Blue Monday the best Monday of the year!


Tackling Obesity

Posted on 2nd January 2018 by

With the UK recently being branded as the most obese country in the EU it’s clear that it’s time to start making some changes. Nearly 65% of the UK’s population are overweight and almost a quarter are classified as obese.

Obesity is responsible for about one in every ten deaths in Britain and costs the NHS £5.1 billion a year. It vastly increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age and leads to more than 100 amputations a week.

But how do we change it? More fad diets and ‘the best’ new exercise regimes pop up on social media every day. But what do we really need to do to get the weight off and keep it off?

Well the short answer is that we need to expend more calories through exercise than we put in through eating in order to lose weight. But not all foods are equal; some high calorie foods such as avocados and nuts, which are banned on many diets, actually contain high quantities of important vitamins and minerals which are an essential part of our diet and can even help to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Meanwhile many low-calorie foods and drinks may be high in sugar instead.

The Government recommends that all healthy individuals over the age of five years eat a healthy, balanced diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables and starchy foods.

The Eatwell Plate is a pictorial representation of the recommended balance of the different food groups in the diet. It aims to encourage people to choose the right balance and variety of foods to help them obtain the wide range of nutrients they need to stay healthy.

eat well

A healthy, balanced diet should:

  • include plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least 5 portions a day of a variety of different types
  • include meals based on starchy foods, such as bread, pasta, rice and potatoes (including high-fibre varieties where possible)
  • include moderate amounts of milk and dairy products – choosing low-fat options where possible
  • include moderate amounts of foods that are good sources of protein – such as meat, fish, eggs, beans and lentils
  • be low in foods that are high in fat, especially saturated fat, high in sugar and high in salt (typically processed foods)

Exercise to lose weight needs to be a combination of cardiovascular and resistance training to be most effective. Other than that, there’s not really a right or wrong here – what exercise you chose will depend on what you enjoy and any other injuries or health problems you might have. If you’re not sure it’s always best to consult your GP or physio first. Picking an exercise that you enjoy means you are much more likely to keep it up in the long term. By joining a class or inviting a friend to join in with you, exercise becomes more of a social activity than a chore and so you’re much more likely to stick at it. Aim for 5 x 30minute sessions every week, this can be anything that gets the heart rate up – from gardening and hoovering to a gym session, bike ride or swim. If you’re interested in our group exercise classes we currently offer pilates, active backs and positive steps, as well as individualised rehab plans with one of our sports therapists.

Wherever you start, start with small changes to your diet and your exercise routine that are both achievable and sustainable.


Active 10 – 10 Steps To An Active You

Posted on 6th April 2017 by

It’s well known that our nation is struggling to reach the Government targets for physical activity and that this is having pretty severe consequences on 10 Steps to an active you our health and wellbeing.

I think a big part of the problem with the guidelines is that people think doing the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day is unachievable. That they have to be sweating it in the gym or running marathons and subsequently don’t do anything!

So, it’s great to see Public Health England’s new initiative 10 Steps To An Active You. You may have seen the posters or leaflets cropping up near you!

The message is simple, you don’t have to do an intense workout to get the benefits of exercise, walking briskly counts too. They’ve even launched a free app that takes away the guesswork. It shows how much brisk walking you’re doing and how you can do more. It’s easy to use and helps you set your goals for the day.

Why is walking briskly good for my health?

There is evidence to show that a brisk 10 minute walk each day brings the following health benefits:

  • Increased physical fitness
  • Greater ease in performing everyday physical activities
  • Improved mood
  • Improved quality of life
  • Increased physical leanness and healthier weight

A regular 10 minute brisk walk can make you feel better in so many ways. It can boost your energy, clear your head and lift your mood, as well as lowering your risk of serious illnesses such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Why brisk walking? Wouldn’t something more intense be better?

Research shows that rather than the number of steps taken or distance walked, it’s the combination of the intensity of the exercise and how long you’re doing it for that leads to the health benefits. That’s why we’re focusing on encouraging people to go for at least one brisk 10 minute walk a day.

More intense exercise can benefit those who are able to make the commitment to this, while brisk walking is for people who find it difficult to find the time to fit exercise into their day.

You can read more about Active 10 and download the free app here.