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Young Athlete Support

Posted on 30th March 2020 by

goPhysio are delighted to provide support to local young athletes and sports clubs, including Swan Netball Club and Stoneham Football Club.

We also provide additional support to individual athletes, one being Josh. Josh is a discus thrower with his sights set high! We asked Josh a bit more about his specialist sport.

Tell us a little bit more about you and your athletic career to date? 

I started competing in discus in 2016 and found a hidden talent for such an unpopular event early on and In my first competition I threw a distance that got me to top of the UK rankings for my age group.

I have placed first in all competitions in 2018 apart from the European trials and finished the season with titles of Under 17 discus…

  • Hampshire champion🥇
  • English Schools champion🥇
  • International Schools champion🥇
  • National champion🥇
  • International school games champion🥇

I was ranked number 1 in the UK in 2018 for the under 17 age category with a throw of 55.97m. This year I competed at the world schools athletics competition in Croatia for England in the Under 18 age category coming 5th, contributing to the boys England team coming 2nd overall. My personal best this year is 53 metres resulting in me being ranked 4th in the UK and hoping for a lot more by the end of next year.

What does a typical training schedule look like for you? 

Without going into too much detail I’m in the gym doing strength and conditioning about 5x a week. Which includes anything from Olympic lifting (or attempting anyway) to ballistic training to standard weightlifting. My main aim isn’t to build show muscle but go muscle, as i like to put it, so my reps are lower the weights aren’t. I’m also usually down at the track 3-4x a week but currently it’s 2-3 due to the cold however we do indoor throwing sessions to make up for that.

What does coming to goPhysio help you with? 

3 words. Maintenance, prevention and restoration. You can think of going to goPhysio almost like going to a car garage. You are a car and garage is there to tighten any loose screws, refill your tires and most importantly prevent the chance breakdown on the road!

I’m going to have and do have injuries, weaknesses, the whole lot but I know I would have fared a whole lot worse if it wasn’t for the help goPhysio have provided me. My assigned Therapist, Rosie, is helping me with old injuries but also preventing any from creeping up on me further down the line and I can’t exactly exactly ask for more than that.

My event, uncommon though it is, requires an immense amount of co-ordination and power. All throwers have to produce the most efficient movements as fast as possible and because of this any weak link or flaw can be the difference of metres at a young age or the crucial centimetres at their prime. goPhysio helps me identify that weak link, that limiter so that I can achieve my potential and hopefully repay the incredible support network they’ve offered me by doing just that.

Why did you choose to get help at goPhysio? 

Convenience and reputation. Not only is goPhysio basically down the road they are also one of the most suggested from those I’ve know do have had issues and needed somewhere to go. The staff are friendly and the atmosphere isn’t one of dread (ing of what’s coming) but relief that it will be okay. Before i gained support from goPhysio I’d been there previously for a knee injury that costed me losing out on going to nationals but with their help I was able to get back to doing what I love quicker then i thought i would and you can’t really ask for more than that.

What are your plans for the future? 

In terms of where I want to take my sport, my only answer really is as far as I possibly can. I’m an Olympic and Commonwealth hopeful, just like any other athlete who loves their sport, my current aims are Paris Olympics 2024 and the Commonwealth Games of 2022. I plan to throw at least 58 metres this year to qualify for the Under 20 world championships in Nairobi and finish top 3 in the UK. That’s the plan anyway and with the support from goPhysio my dreams are ever closer to becoming a reality.



Runners – How to maximise your training time!

Posted on 26th June 2017 by

A lot of runners get stuck into a rut of running the same route at the same pace week in, week out. Whilst this is a fine way of maintaining our current fitness level it is not going to be enough to help us run further or faster. Even just adding the miles at our habitual comfortable pace will only lead to modest improvements in our endurance.

To really get the most out of our training we need to add variety. This challenges both our muscles and our energy systems in new ways to increase the rate at which they adapt to our training. Not only that but it has the added psychological bonus of experimenting with new routes and new training regimes to help keep us motivated and reduce risk of injury.

If you’re short on time the great news is that you don’t need to spend hours pounding away on the tarmac to achieve significant changes in your speed and endurance – you’re likely to get more benefit from a 30 minute higher intensity interval session than from a 1.5 hour run, although they both have their place!

There are 4 main types of training every runner should have in their programme:

  • Long slow run (LSR)
  • Tempo run
  • Speed/hill/interval session
  • Cross training

Long slow run

The LSR should be your longest (and slowest!) run of the week, the one which you gradually add miles to. This steady state sub-maximal training helps to build capillary density and increases number of mitochondria in your muscle cells which are an important part of our aerobic energy system. By doing this we increase the endurance and efficiency of both our cardiovascular system and our muscles. It also primes our tendons and bones to increase their stiffness to cope with gradually increases distances.

Tempo run

Tempo pace is described as ‘comfortably hard’. It is the maximum pace that we can sustain for approximately 1 hour. You should not be able to talk in full sentences but also not gasping for air if you are working in tempo zone.

Training in the ‘tempo zone’ means you are working at or just below your lactate threshold i.e. the point where the bodies ability to remove lactate from the blood is overtaken by the amount of lactate being produced.

As lactate levels increase the body begins to feel fatigued. Therefore by training just below our threshold we gradually increase it – this means we delay the onset of fatigue, helping us run further and faster.

Tempo runs should start with a 10 min warm up then aim to run for 20 minutes at the fastest pace you could sustain for 1 hour. As this gets easier you can gradually increase the time in the tempo zone up to 60 minutes.

Speed/hill/interval session

There are thousands of different ways to do interval sessions. These are the work outs that are going to increase your overall speed and power. They need to be short but hard – if you aren’t out of breath at the end you didn’t do it right! Don’t try to add intervals to your long runs, you won’t be able to work maximally and so you won’t get the full benefit. These sessions should last about 30 minutes in total, allowing 5-10 minutes for warm up and some recovery time in the middle. The fitter you are the shorter the recovery periods you’ll need between intervals and the more sets you can add.

Here’s a few ideas:

Intervals

Begin with: 10 min warm up, run 1 min mod-hard effort: 1 min easy jogging x 5
Progress to: 10 min warm up, 1 min max effort with 90 secs recovery x 10

Hill training

Begin with: 10 min warm up, 3 x 30 secs moderate effort uphill, walking back down
Progress to: 5 x 1min hard effort uphill, jogging back down with 30-60secs rest in between sets
Start with smaller hills then progress to steeper ones!

Cross training

Cross training means doing something other than running! This allows ‘active rest’ – working different muscle groups to running which prevents muscle imbalance but also training our running muscles in different ways to allows greater strength adaptations without overloading the tendons and joints.

Low impact options are great so try swimming or cycling for cardio. Pilates helps to build up your core postural muscles, making you more efficient when you run, and resistance training using relatively light weights and high repetitions allows you to strengthen and tone muscles without gaining muscle mass.

If you’ve got a race coming up, like the Winchester Half Marathon, which is particularly hilly, mixing up your training is crucial.

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