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goPhysio Joint Focus: The Shoulder

Posted on 25th March 2017 by

The shoulder joins the arm to the trunk and is the most mobile, yet unstable joint in the body.

The ‘shoulder complex’ is actually made up of 4 joints

  • The shoulder joint itself known as the Glenohumeral joint. This is a ball and socket type of joint between the head of the upper arm bone or humerus and the glenoid cavity of the scapula or shoulder blade.
  • The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is where the clavicle or collar bone meets the acromion of the shoulder blade.
  • The sternoclavicular (SC) joint is where the clavicle (collar bone) meets the chest bone or sternum.
  • The scapulothoracic joint is where the shoulder blade meets with the ribs at the back of the chest.

Shoulder anatomy

The shoulder joints rely on a complex, synchronised pattern of muscle and joint interaction to maintain stability and function of the whole arm.

This excessive mobility is its main weakness, causing it to become easily injured through trauma or overuse.

Common Injuries

Here are some of the most common shoulder area injuries and problems we tend to see

  • Rotator cuff injuries and tendonopathies
  • Shoulder impingement or subacromial impingement
  • Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis
  • Muscle and ligament tears
  • Tendon problems such as biceps tendonopathy
  • Traumatic shoulder dislocation
  • Recurrent shoulder dislocation
  • Fractures of the humerus or collar bone
  • Acromioclavicular joint sprains
  • Sternocalvicular joint sprains
  • Bursitis

Shoulder injuries are often associated with certain sports such as swimming or tennis, where a large degree of shoulder flexibility is required, along with repetitive and large movements. The shoulder is prone to overuse injuries.

It can also suffer a wide range of traumatic injuries, such as fractures, dislocations, sprains and tears as a result of a fall, impact or collision during sport or every day life.

There are many physiotherapy treatments that can help with shoulder problems. We always start by carrying out a thorough assessment to find out exactly what’s going on with your shoulder. Once this is established, you’ll start a comprehensive rehabilitation programme. This may be a combination of hands on treatments such as soft tissue work, taping, trigger point release, mobilisations or acupuncture and a big focus on exercises to regain strength, flexibility and endurance in your shoulder. A crucial part of recovery from a shoulder injury is making sure all the joints and muscles are working well together, a key part in preventing any future problems.

If you’ve suffered a shoulder injury or are experiencing pain in your shoulder area, give us a call or book an appointment online at our Chandlers Ford Physiotherapy Clinic in Hampshire.

 

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Joint Focus: The Shoulder & Arm

Posted on 8th February 2017 by

Shoulder injuriesThe shoulder joins the arm to the trunk and is the most mobile, yet unstable joint in the body. It relies on a complex, synchronised pattern of muscle and joint interaction to maintain stability and function of the whole arm.

This excessive mobility is its main weakness, causing it to become easily injured through trauma, overuse or the cumulative effects of poor posture.

Common shoulder and arm injuries

Injuries we often see at goPhysio to the shoulder & arm include:

If you’re suffering with shoulder or arm pain and it’s stopping you doing what you love or being as active as you need to be, our team can help you. We offer a range of services from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, which can help identify & resolve your shoulder or arm problems and also address the prevention of such injuries.

If you want any advice, please do give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or you can book an appointment online.


Tennis Injuries

Posted on 2nd July 2016 by

We’re half way through the famous annual Wimbledon Tennis event. It’s such a popular event and Tennis injuries Chandlers Fordcertainly creates a buzz around the sport.

Tennis places huge physical demands on the professionals, which is understandable given the rigorous training and competition they take part in. Yet, for the novice tennis players out there, injuries can be just as problematic.

Common tennis injuries include:

  • Tennis elbow
  • Shoulder injuries such as rotator cuff tears or impingement
  • Low back pain
  • Wrist sprains
  • Calf muscle injuries
  • Ankle sprains
  • Knee injuries such as ligament sprain or tendon issues
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

Mild to moderate soft tissue injuries can often be well managed at home using P.O.L.I.C.E. principles. However, many tennis injuries result from ‘overuse’ – so an injury that is from a sustained, repeated action, like a tennis grip or swing. If this is the case, you may need help identifying exactly where the problem is stemming from and what changes that are needed. Physiotherapy is an effective way of resolving all of the above common injuries.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy have written a summary of the common tennis injuries and how physiotherapy can help.

If injury’s stopping you from enjoying a game of tennis, then get is touch with us at goPhysio. We’ll provide an accurate diagnosis of your injury and a treatment programme that works to get you back in the game.