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World Physiotherapy Day 2020

Posted on 7th September 2020 by

World Physiotherapy Day is held every year on 8 September, the day the World Confederation for Physical Therapy was founded in 1951. It is a day when physiotherapists can promote the profession to:

  • Showcase the significant role the profession makes to the health and wellbeing of the global population
  • Raise the profile of the profession
  • Campaign on behalf of the profession and its patients to governments and policy makers

The day marks the unity and solidarity of the physiotherapy community around the world. It is an opportunity to recognise the work that physiotherapists do for their patients and community!

The focus for this year’s World Physiotherapy Day is rehabilitation after COVID-19 and the role of physiotherapists in the treatment and management of people affected by COVID-19.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages:

  1. Exercise can play an important part in a person’s recovery from COVID-19
  2. As the experts in movement, physiotherapists can guide people in how exercise can help recovery
  3. People who have had severe cases of COVID-19 will need rehabilitation and physiotherapy to recover from the effects of treatment for the disease
  4. Using telehealth can help people access support from a physiotherapist to help them manage the impact of COVID-19
  5. Telehealth can be as effective as conventional healthcare methods to improve physical function

Exercise

Exercise is an important part of your recovery from COVID-19, paced to match your needs. As experts in movement and exercise, physiotherapists can guide you in how exercise can help:

  • improve fitness
  • reduce breathlessness
  • increase muscle strength
  • improve balance and coordination
  • improve your thinking
  • reduce stress and improve mood
  • increase confidence
  • improve your energy

Whether or not you’ve had COVID-19, many people may be wary of re-starting exercise or don’t know where to start.

You may have had COVID-19 and are not yet feeling physically ready to exercise, you may have been shielding or isolating for the past few months or you may have lost all your confidence as a result of lockdown.

As Physio’s, we can really hold your hand and guide you back into exercise in a very careful and supportive way. With our training and knowledge, we have the unique combination of skills that allow us to integrate and consider not only the best way to achieve the health benefits of exercise, but also your recovery from illness, pain and injury.

Here at goPhysio, in addition to 1-2-1 Physiotherapy or Sports Therapy, we have created a dedicated rehabilitation space, known as The Strong Room, from where we can gently guide and support you in regaining strength and rebuilding exercise habits. Our 1-2-1 exercise rehabilitation service is totally tailored to you, your aims and goals. We also offer both mat and Reformer Pilates, either 1-2-1 or small classes.

Telehealth

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a huge shift in how physiotherapists worked. Lockdown meant we were unable to see people in person (face to face), but pain and injuries didn’t stop and people still needed our help. So, we were able to embrace technology and offer support through online channels (aka Telehealth, Virtual, online, eHealth……..)

What is telehealth?

Telehealth or eHealth is the use of electronic communications to share medical information to improve a person’s health.

We are still offering the option of online physiotherapy and also Pilates at goPhysio, however, most people that we are booking in or need our help, are desperate to have the personal contact and benefits of face to face or in person appointments. Whilst Telehealth has experienced a huge surge and is undoubtedly here to stay, it has it’s limitations. Read more about our thoughts on this on a recent blog here.

Did you know?

Post Viral fatigue syndrome Up to 10% of people recovering from COVID-19 may develop post viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS). If you feel you are not improving, or if activity is making you feel much worse, speak to your physiotherapist or healthcare practitioner and ask them to assess you for PVFS. The rehabilitation of people with PVFS requires different management strategies.

Some resources and further information

An exercise plan to help your COVID-19 recovery

Your recovery after severe illness with COVID-19

Accessing rehabilitation with telehealth

#worldptday



Post COVID Recovery

Posted on 3rd July 2020 by

We’re staring to see (albeit online only if appropriate), a number of people who have had and are recovering from Coronavirus.

It certainly seems to have a really significant impact on people longer term, even those who may have had milder symptoms. We’ve put together some useful tips and advice, to help you be realistic about and optimise your recovery.

Why is rehabilitation important?

While you are recovering, focusing on taking some time for your recovery and rehabilitation is really important. Rehabilitation will improve your exercise tolerance, muscle strength and help manage any breathlessness and fatigue.

You should focus on breathing, functional and physical exercises. Here at goPhysio, we can help guide you on the best types of exercises either through our online service or face to face, if it’s appropriate. We will help to put together a rehabilitation programme that is tailored exactly to you and where you are and where you want to be.

Making sure you’re suitably hydrated and nourished play a really important role in your body’s response to and recovery from the COVID-19 virus. Eating well (together with the exercises) will help to rebuild your muscle strength and function.

REHABILITATION: The action of restoring someone to health or normal life through training and therapy.

What can I do to help myself?

Making sure you resume some ‘normality’ and routine is a great way to boost your recovery. Here’s a few tips:

  • Get up at a normal hour
  • Try and restart a regular morning routine e.g. wash, brush teeth, get dressed
  • Sit in a chair for meals
  • Follow advice on eating and drinking well
  • Think about keeping an exercise and activity diary

Why do I feel breathless?

Breathlessness is a very common symptom in some people with COVID-19. The lungs can become inflamed and the effort of breathing can increase. You may be breathing quicker and shallower, however it is important to try and stay calm. Anxiety can increase your heart rate and make your breathing rate increase further. This should improve over time. You can try some breathing control exercises to help.

Breathing control – something to help you relax

  1. Get in a comfortable position
  2. Close your eyes and bring your attention to your breathing
  3. Breathe in and out through your nose (or mouth if you are unable to do this)
  4. Try to breathe in for the count of one, and out for count of two, working towards a longer breath out than in, to slow your breathing rate down
  5. Notice areas of tension in the body and try to release this with each breath out
  6. Gradually try to make your breaths slower and deeper

You can try various positions if you[re feeling breathless, that you may find help ease the breathlessness. Try:

  1. Lying on your side, propped up with pillows with your knees bent a little
  2. Sit upright and lean forwards over a table onto some pillow and relax
  3. Stand and lean onto a windowsill or forwards onto a wall

Mobility & Exercise

Moving little and often will help with your breathing and get your muscles working again, easing stiffness, achey joints and improve your strength and flexibility. All of this will help you get back to doing the things you’ve missed. There are different levels of mobility you should slowly work towards.

  1. Sitting on the edge of your bed
  2. Standing up from sitting
  3. Getting out of your bed and sitting in a chair
  4. Walk within a small space
  5. Walk around your home
  6. Walk around your garden
  7. Climb stairs or steps
  8. Getting outside

Exercises

It is really important to do some regular exercises that will help with:

  • Building up your muscle strength
  • Improving your muscle flexibility
  • Working on exercise stamina and endurance
  • Regaining balance
  • Improving functional activities

Exercise Diary: you may find using an exercise diary helpful. You can track your exercises and score how hard you are working using the Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale (RPE Chart).

As you progress, you can increase the number of repetitions of exercises you are doing and increase the number of exercise sessions each day. Exercises should feel ‘light’ to between ‘somewhat hard’ and ‘hard’ (RPE 3 – 5), and your breathing should allow you to maintain uninterrupted conversation throughout.

“Little and often” is the best approach.

Managing Fatigue

You may notice that your energy levels are low and and that doing simple daily activities suddenly feel like you’re doing a marathon. Fatigue is a common symptom of COVID-19. Although rest is important in recovery, unlike normal tiredness it does not improve with rest alone.

Feelings of fatigue can be made worse if you’re still experiencing episodes of breathlessness, muscle de-conditioning from having spent long periods inactive and in bed and also from stress that you may be feeling after a period of illness.

What can I do about fatigue? Fatigue can make managing your usual daily tasks more difficult. All daily tasks require the body to use energy through moving and thinking. Fatigue management can help you to understand how to make the most of your body’s available energy. This can help you to find ways to balance your physical, social and emotional needs when your energy levels are reduced.

Rating your fatigue from 1-10 will help you identify patterns of fatigue. You can discuss this with your Occupational Therapist who will support you to identify strategies to manage your fatigue.

Completing a fatigue diary and rating your fatigue before and after an activity (e.g. having a wash and dressing) can help you to understand how different activities can affect your energy levels.

How to use a fatigue diary

  • Start at the beginning of each day
  • Write down each activity including rest period you havetaken in each three hour interval
  • Use a scale of 0 – 10 (0 = no fatigue, 10 = extreme fatigue) to score how you felt at the end of this three hour period
  • Record any other factors you feel are relevant e.g. stressful events, skipping meals, over-exertion
  • Use the diary to track your progress and work out any patterns and record how you’re progressing

If you need any support or help, we are here for you. Our range of skills and services, with both online and face to face options, provides a host of ways to support your recovery.

The best place to start would be on online or face to face assessment with one of our Physio’s so we can establish where you are in your recovery journey, find out what your goals are and put together a realistic and gradual way for you to achieve this.

Our support can include a specific and progressive exercise programme, which we can monitor and develop as you recover, ways to help any areas of pain, discomfort, stiffness or tension, advice on pacing and returning to work, hobbies and sport, whatever it is you’d like to do.

Just call us on 023 8025 3317 to find out more and boost your recovery.


New Exercise Program

Posted on 6th February 2020 by

Exercise is almost always a key part of your recovery if you’ve had an injury. Exercises can be used to help improve your strength, flexibility, movement control, posture, balance and no end of other ways. We make sure that all our patients receive a customised set of exercises, designed to help you the most depending on what stage of receiver you’re at, your lifestyle, normal activity levels and the exact type of injury you have.

We’re always looking for ways to improve what we’re doing here at goPhysio.

We’ve recently updated the software we use to send you your bespoke exercise program.

After your appointment, your Therapist will send you an email with details of your exercise program. The email will include a link directly to your exercises, where it says ‘You can access your online report here.’ The email will also contain the name of your exercise program and a user name and password, so you can log in to access your exercises directly. (You can change these log in details once you’ve logged in the first time to something more memorable).



Once you have your log in details, you can now access your exercise program through our website, by clicking on the ‘Your Exercises’ tab.


goPhysio Exercises

This will take you to your log in page.


Once you have logged in, you will be able to see your recommended exercises, print them and even watch video demonstrations.


goPhysio exercises

There is also an app version for Apple and Android. For user ease, we’d recommend you set your own user name and password through the email link before using the app (as the issued ones are pretty lengthy!) as you need to enter this every time you access the app.

If you forget your user name or password at any point, please just send us an email or access your original email for your exercises.

goPhysio Physiotec

Lower Limb Tendon Pain – What shouldn’t you be doing?

Posted on 28th November 2018 by

We love a good Infographic here at goPhysio, and recently came across this great one from @YLMSportsScience10 Things NOT To Do If You Have Lower Limb Tendon Pain.

Lower Limb Tendon Pain

Tendon pain in the lower limb, aka tendinopathy, tnodionitis, tendonopathies……like achilles tendinopathy or patella tendinopathy, are one of the most common type of injuries we see at our clinic in Chandlers Ford. It’s a side effect of having a pretty active, local population who regularly take part in exercise to help keep them healthy!

Tendon pain can be pretty frustrating to have. Firstly, because it often affects those that are naturally more active or sporty, so has a huge impact on being able to do what you love to do. And secondly, it can be difficult to know what to do for the best. There’s lot’s of conflicting information out there and can be a bit of trial and error to find the right solution and have a successful recovery.

So, this infographic, which illustrates some great, evidence based principles on managing lower limb tendon issues, offers some extremely useful guidance.

  1. Do not rest completely – we prefer the term ‘relative rest’. So advise that you avoid activities that directly aggravate your pain, but keep going with others or find alternatives. It’s important to carry on ‘loading’ (so getting your tendon to work) to help your recovery.
  2. Do not rely on ‘passive’ treatments – there is overwhelming evidence that passive treatments (so something that’s just done to you, whilst you lay there happily!) alone will not help with tendon problems. They can be useful in relieving your pain in the short term, enabling you to do some more specific exercises though.
  3. Do not have injection therapy – this advice refers to having an injection as the first line of treatment. If you’ve tried a consistent, high quality, exercise based treatment plan and it hasn’t worked, then injection therapy may be indicated or Shockwave Therapy is also a good alternative to consider for certain conditions.
  4. Do not ignore your pain – just like #1, use your pain level as a guide for your activity. Pain in your tendon is your body’s way of telling you it can’t really cope and you need to listen to it!
  5. Do not stretch your tendon – when you place your tendon on stretch, the lengthening action also compresses the tendon and this has been shown to affect recovery. There are alternative exercises to stretching that are significantly more beneficial to you.
  6. Do not massage your tendon – if it’s painful, it’s irritated. Massaging directly on the tendon is likely to cause further irritation and make the pain worse.
  7. Do not be worried about images of your tendon – try not to have a picture in your mind of what your painful tendon might look like on an ultrasound or MRI scan. Visions of or words like ‘degeneration’ or ‘tears’ can make you afraid of using your tendon, when actually, gradually building up what you do and with guided, appropriate rehabilitation is the best way of recovering.
  8. Do not be worried about rupture – reassuringly, most people who rupture their tendon have not had any pain. Because you have pain, you are naturally easing off what you do (if you’re listening to your body and respecting your tendon!), so you really don’t need to worry about the risk of rupturing your tendon.
  9. Don’t take short cuts with rehabilitation – it takes time for an injured tendon to build strength and capacity (ability to cope with the demands you place upon it). There are no quick, easy fixes unfortunately! With the right rehab, outcomes are excellent. That’s exactly why we now have supervised, exercise based rehabilitation at the clinic. So you can work on a customised, specific, evidence based rehabilitation programme that will give you the best outcomes.
  10. Do not have a lack of understanding of what loads are right for your tendon – this is crucial but not an easy concept for non-Therapist to understand fully. Gradually loading your tendon to optimise recovery is fundamental. What you should be doing and when can take careful management. Sometimes the internet or ‘Bob‘ at the Running Club, or @RunningLover on Twitter aren’t fully qualified or experienced enough to help you with this. You need to call in the experts, and that’ where we come in!

What is load?

If you read anything ‘rehab’ based about tendons, you will often hear the term LOAD and may be thinking what exactly does that mean?

Load can be simplified as the demands that you place upon your body. So, if you take your achilles tendon, when you walk you are loading it, running you are loading it even more, jumping loading it even more! If you go on your tip toes, you’ll be loading it; if you’re holding a weight whilst going up and down on your tip toes, you’ll be loading it even more.

So loading can be varied by weight, duration, number of times or how long you do something for, how high impact you are working at……….there’s lot’s or variations.

What next?

If you are suffering with a tendon problem, don’t waste any more time or prolong your frustration. Seek expert advise from us at goPhysio. We are able to offer you a full package of support, with as little or as much ‘hand holding’ as you need. Give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to book your first appointment.


Stay hydrated and reduce plastic waste with this great initiative!

Posted on 6th August 2018 by

The topic of reducing plastic use has gained huge momentum recently. A million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute and it’s predicted that Refillfigure will rise by another 20% by 2021. However global efforts to collect and recycle the bottles to keep them from polluting the oceans, are just not keeping up.

Here in the UK, the average household uses 480 plastic bottles a year, but only recycles 270 of them – meaning nearly half (44%) are NOT put in the recycling. This means that nationally, of the over 35 million plastic bottles being used every day in the UK, nearly 16 million plastic bottles aren’t being put out for recycling.

If just one in ten Brits refilled once a week, we’d have 340 million less plastic bottles a year in circulation!

Refill

Water consumption and plastic use was something that was highlighted by Southern Water recently at the Eastleigh Business Conference. They introduced a fantastic scheme that has been initiated, called ‘Refiill’. 

Refill is a national, practical water campaign that aims to make refilling your own bottle as easy, convenient and cheap as possible by introducing refill stations on every street!

The concept is easy:

  1. Download the Refil App
  2. Take a reusable drink bottle with you wherever you go 
  3. Drink plenty of water 
  4. When you run out of water and need a refill, visit the app and see where your nearest Refill station is.
  5. Go to your nearest Refill station and fill up! 

We all know that drinking plenty of water is crucial to our health. Not only is good hydration fundamental to general health, but Is a key element to post exercise recovery.

It’s win win, saves you spending money on buying water, makes use of your refillable drinking bottle, saving on plastic! 

It’s a small step, but a great one to take! 

goPhysio in Chandlers Ford are delighted to be part of this scheme. If you’re passing, you can pop in Refill Chandlers Ford Hampshire and fill up your water bottle with freshly filtered, chilled water! 

Download the Refill app here.

Read more about Refill here.

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Easing Post Run Soreness

Posted on 18th March 2018 by

You’ve done it, you’ve got off the couch and finished that run! Whether it’s a gentle recreational run, a 10k or a full marathon, post run soreness can be part of the journey. It’s just your muscles adapting to the additional demands placed upon them, which is good!

You can read more about post exercise pain here.

There are some tried and tested steps you can take, that help to ease post run soreness. Here’s a few from our Sports Therapist, Tom.

  1. Rest

It may seem obvious but resting from physical exertion will allow sore muscles time to rebuild. However, there is a big difference between complete rest and active recovery. Complete rest can result in decreased range of motion and prolonged soreness. Active recovery is defined by a light workout comprising of lower intensity and volume which facilitates the removal of waste products and restores normal resting length of muscles. For example, a runner with sore legs may opt for 30 minutes on a static bike at a steady pace.

  1. Sports Massage

Muscle soreness following a run can be effectively eased with sports massage. The massage techniques used will decrease exercise-induced inflammation, improve blood flow and reduce muscle tightness. Sports massage can also have an effect on the nervous system by down-regulating it to allow the muscles to relax. Manual therapy techniques can stimulate the lymphatic system which helps drain swelling and by-products of exercise out of the damaged muscles. Increased blood flow to these areas will bring new nutrient-rich blood to facilitate the repair phase following intense exercise. You can book your sports massage online here.

  1. Self-Myofascial Release

Performed using tools such as foam rollers, trigger point balls, massage sticks, etc. Similar to massage, this technique allows you to self-treat by targeting the muscles that need it most. You will be able to ease inflammation, improve blood flow and restore the normal resting length of muscles. Read more about foam rolling here. If you want to learn more, why not come along to one of our monthly foam rolling practical workshops.

  1. Food & Hydration

You can utilise a few simple nutrition strategies to restore homeostasis and facilitate muscle repair. Eat high-glycemic fruits and starchy vegetables following exercise to replenish glycogen stores in muscles. Antioxidants present in these foods can also aid tissue repair and recovery. Eating foods high in protein (such as eggs) can enhance energy production and stimulate protein synthesis, which repairs damaged muscles from intense training. Fish oils (omega 3) also contain anti-inflammatory properties which will help ease post-race soreness.

A reduction in hydration of only 2 percent is enough to have detrimental effects on maximal strength and athletic performance due to a drop in blood plasma volume. This limits the amount of nutrients and energy received by the working muscles. Drink frequently throughout the day to keep yourself hydrated and reduce the risk of delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS).

  1. Sleep

Make sure you get between 7-8hours of sleep each night. Sleep is important as it not only restores brain function and alertness, but it also regulates growth hormone release and protein synthesis. Your muscles do all their repair work whilst you sleep, so getting enough shut-eye is crucial when training. During the restorative phase of sleep your blood pressure drops, breathing slows and blood flows to the muscles and soft tissue that need repair.

  1. Compression

Specific garments can be worn during and after intense exercise to reduce the amount of residual inflammation in working tissues. We know that muscles are damaged when we exercise, this damage causes inflammation which can also irritate nerve endings and result in prolonged pain/soreness. The idea behind compression is to limit the space available for soft tissues to swell with inflammation, thus reducing pain levels. Compression with movement will also facilitate the removal of waste products and inflammation out of working/damaged tissues.

  1. Heat

It is well established that heat can be a great pain-reliever. Applying heat to sore muscles can encourage a relaxation effect. The warmth will also vasodilate blood vessels allowing for nutrient-rich blood to be brought to the area that needs repair.

  1. Stretching

You may be surprised to hear that stretching isn’t as effective at easing muscle soreness as you may have thought. Think about it this way; the most traumatic form of muscle contraction is an eccentric one. This occurs when you contract a muscle over a period of time whilst it is lengthening, for example the lowering phase of a bicep curl. This muscle has been damaged (on a microscopic level) by a lengthening-based exercise. You are then attempting to ease that soreness by stretching the muscle, which is only lengthening it further. Also noteworthy is the role of the central nervous system, which uses pain as a protective signalling mechanism to prevent the same movement from occurring again. Stretching a painful area is likely to produce a larger nervous system response resulting in increased pain levels.

A review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in 2011 concludes that stretching does not ease soreness following exercise.

Herbert RD, de Noronha M, Kamper SJ. Stretching to prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD004577. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004577.pub3.

  1. Ice

A golden rule to follow when considering ice vs heat for different situations is this; ice for acute, traumatic injuries to be used predominantly for pain relief and not much else. Heat is to be used for chronic, dull, achy pain such as joint stiffness or muscle tightness.

When applying ice to an injured area it can cause blood vessels to constrict, limiting blood flow to the area. We need a good blood supply for muscles to regenerate and repair. Ice also causes muscles to tighten which seems to be the opposite effect when searching for muscles relaxation and relief of soreness. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 36 articles published in 2015 suggests that ice (cryotherapy) provides little or no significant effect in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle soreness.

Hohenauer E, Taeymans J, Baeyens J-P, Clarys P, Clijsen R (2015) The Effect of Post-Exercise Cryotherapy on Recovery Characteristics: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE 10(9): e0139028. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139028

If your soreness doesn’t ease after a few days or you are in pain as you think you may have picked up an injury, do get it checked out. The sooner you get an expert diagnosis of what’s going on and a specific recovery plan, the less time you’ll have off running!


Sleep: The Magic Elixir for Runners

Posted on 19th January 2018 by

I’ve just recently read a great book, titled Why We Sleep, by the neuroscientist, Matthew Waker. Why we sleep

I wanted to share a summary of the relevant sections, which I thought would be enlightening and useful for you keen, active, health conscious runners. If it sparks your interest, I would thoroughly recommend getting hold of a copy to read it in full. It really is fascinating!

Walker explains that:

“Sleep is one of the most important aspects of life, health and longevity and yet it is increasingly neglected in 21st century society”

For the active runner, adequate sleep is crucial to help in learning new motor skills, improving athletic performance and mitigating injury risk!

In the book, Walker explains that the term ‘muscle memory’ is a misnomer, muscles have no such memory, and that in fact ‘muscle memory’ is really ‘brain memory’. As humans, we learn new motor skills and movement routines through practice. For a runner it could be working on running technique, training or strengthening muscles in the gym, which can help us better execute a skilled memory routine (running). But the routine itself – the memory programme resides firmly and exclusively within the brain.

Research over the past 20 years has unequivocally demonstrated that after practicing any motor skill, your brain will continue to improve skill memories in the absence of further practice after a full night sleep. Walker concludes that in fact

“Practice does not make perfect, it is practice followed by a nights sleep that leads to perfection”

Sleep helps the brain automate the movement routines – helping them become second nature and effortless – precisely the goal of many sports coaches when perfecting the skills of their athletes.

The 100-metre sprinter superstar Usain Bolt has, on many occasions taken naps in the hours before breaking the world record and before Olympic finals in which he won gold. The author’s studies support this wisdom: day time naps that contain sufficient numbers of sleep spindles also offer significant motor skill memory improvement, together with a restoring benefit on perceived energy and reduced muscle fatigue.

“Sleep is one of the most sophisticated, potent and powerful – not to mention legal – performance enhancer’s everyone should be using fully”

The book’s findings are backed up with more than 750 scientific studies that have investigated the relationship between sleep and human performance. Anything less than 8 hours of sleep a night and especially less than 6 hours a night and the following can be experienced:

  • Time to physical exhaustion drops by 10 to 30%
  • Aerobic output is significantly reduced
  • Similar impairments are observed in power output, measured by limb extension force & vertical jump height
  • Decrease in peak and sustained muscle strength.
  • Marked impairments in cardio-vascular, metabolic and respiratory capabilities linked to a decrease in the amount of air the lungs can expire
  • The ability of the body to cool itself during physical exertion through sweating, a critical part of peak performance, is impaired

Injury Risk 

There is also a significant increase in the risk of injury with a lack of sleep.

“There is no better insurance policy to mitigate the risk of injury than sleep!”

Described in a research study of competitive young athlete’s in 2014, Walker explains that a chronic lack of sleep across a season predicted a massively higher risk of injury, as illustrated on the graph below.

Sleep and injury risk
Sleep after sporting performance is just as crucial for recovery. The book states that

“Post performance sleep accelerates physical recovery from common inflammation, stimulates muscle repair, and helps restock cellular energy in the form of glucose and glycogen”

What does all this mean for the local fun runner?

Regardless of running ability, sleep is equally important for anyone who is physically active. Until recently the experts thought that adequate sleep, good nutrition and exercise were the 3 fundamentals on which to live a healthy life.

However, through a large body of research over the last 20 years, Walker has highlighted that adequate sleep is the foundation on which being healthy and exercising effectively is built upon.

In other words….without adequate sleep you will not gain the full potential benefits of a healthy diet and regular exercise. So, you should be aiming for between 7-8 hours of sleep each night, especially in the midst of a running training programme, to allow your body to recover and achieve the full benefits of training.

For further information, please read Why We Sleep, by Mathew Walker


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Why ‘Massage’ should be a regular entry in your diary!

Posted on 20th November 2017 by

The word Massage can conjure up lots of different thoughts – from a soft, gentle, candle lit, relaxing experience to a quick ‘rub down’ at the side of a muddy pitch!

There are certainly lots of different types and styles of massage; deep tissue, aromatherapy, Sweedish, hot stone………..whatever your preference, the overall aim of massage is to spend some time focused on you, away from every day stresses, helping you feel refreshed, physically relaxed and rejuvenated!

Life can be pretty hectic and more often than not, there is another priority that rises above getting a massage. But, before you prioritise everyone and everything else, let’s explore the benefits that massage can bring you!

Massage is a great way to promote your physical and mental well-being.

Here are our Top 5 Benefits of Massage

  1. Massage Helps Relaxation – This is one of the most immediate and noticeable effects of massage. Massage helps with the release of endorphins, the body’s natural chemicals that produce feelings of calm and well-being. It can also help reduce levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, adrenaline and nor-adrenaline. The impact of this on our general health, wellbeing and longevity can be massive.
  2. Massage Reduces Stress – Stress appears in everyone’s life to some extent. It isn’t always a negative thing, it’s a natural response to help us get through life. However, there are times that stress can become too much or overwhelming and it’s good to have strategies to both help us reduce the feeling of stress and also manage stress day to day. Massage is a fantastic way to both ease your feelings of stress and also manage stress long term. It enforces you to take time out, chill for an hour and will physically help you cope by easing any stress induced tension your muscles are holding.
  3. Massage Helps You Sleep Well – The importance of the quality of our sleep and it’s impact on our life is becoming increasingly recognised. Sleep is an ultimate way to recover and having a massage can undoubtedly help improve your quality of sleep.
  4. Massage Helps Recovery – Physically, massage is a key tool you can use to help not only tour mental but also physical recovery. If you’re training for an event, taken part in a race or competition or just exercise regularly, your body needs recovery to help it perform. The physical effects of a massage can help encourage and promote recovery and ward off injuries. Regular massages part of a training programme is a great investment as it can play a key part in helping prevent injuries and optimising your physical performance.
  5. Massage Improves Circulation – The manual techniques that are used by your massage therapist, will physically encourage circulation by moving blood through your tissues which can help flush the lactic acid through your muscles. It will also help with circulation of lymph fluid which carries metabolic waste any from muscles and internal organs. Enhancing your circulation will help promote healing as oxygen rich blood is circulated to damaged, tense muscles.

How often should I get a massage?

There’s no doubt that having a massage is good for our health and well-being. Whether you’re busy Mum, work at a desk most of the day, training for a marathon or spends hours commuting, a massage will help you feel great!

We often get asked how often people should have a massage. The frequency of a massage comes down to many factors. If you’re training intensely for a physical event, a weekly massage is ideal. If you build up tension in your neck and shoulders over time, once a month may be enough. Generally, once a fortnight is great – as it helps keep top of those stresses and strains, without them building up and becoming a problem.

Whatever works for you, if you can set aside time for a regular massage your body and mind will thank you for it!

What type of massage do you do at goPhysio?

At goPhysio, we practice Sports and Remedial Massage. This is a ‘clinically’ based massage, that involves working on deep tissues to promote recovery and ease tension. Your Therapist will always ask you a series of questions before they start, so they can tailor the experience to your exact needs and the areas you want to focus on. Appointments are available 6 days a week, as early as 8am and as late as 8pm. You can book appointments online here or give us a call on 023 8025 3317. We often have same day appointments available!

So, if you’d like to experience the benefits of regular massage, book your appointment today!


The Benefits of Group Physio and Rehab

Posted on 6th July 2017 by

A recent study from Canada has highlighted the benefits of attending group physiotherapy, for patients following a total knee replacement.

The study demonstrated that patients who participated in group-based physiotherapy after joint replacement surgery achieved statistically and clinically important improvements in mobility and function, and with similar satisfaction levels as patients who receive one-on-one therapy.

It’s not only following surgery that people can benefit from physio and rehab in a group setting, anyone recovering from an injury can reap the rewards!

Having our group rehab sessions now in full swing at goPhysio – here’s some thoughts as to why group physio can have such a positive impact!

  • Connection with other people – Often, when you’ve had an injury or a recovering from surgery, it can be a very lonely time. In a group situation, you can gain positive connections with others, working towards a common goal and helping support each other.
  • Amalgamating social and exercise – Sharing an experience with others brings a social context to rehab. This can help increase enjoyment and motivation, key indicators in longer term success and outcomes.
  • Context – Everyone has days they may struggle or relapse slightly, but you’re not alone. Sharing stories or experiences with other people helps give context and perspective to your recovery and helps ‘normailse’ things. You will also get words of encouragement when others notice how well you are doing (when it may feel to you that progress is slow).
  • Commitment and motivation – Exercising as part of a group helps you commit to your goals, you are more likely to help support your peers and be motivated to continue.

And if group rehab isn’t your thing, we also offer a 1-2-1 rehab service so you can be provided with a structured rehab programme to go and do in your own time at home or in the gym.

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Group Rehab Chandlers Ford Rehabilitation Southampton

Group Rehab Chandlers Ford Group Rehab Southampton

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Group Rehabilitation at goPhysio

1-2-1 Rehabilitation at goPhysio

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Post Marathon Recovery Tips

Posted on 23rd April 2017 by

Whatever your running challenge, whether you’ve run a full 26.2 miles at The London Marathon, ABP Southampton Marathon, the 13.1 miles ABP Half or taken part in a 10k or 5k run, these events can take their toll on your body and mind.

What you do post race plays an important part in your recovery, just like your training and race preparation.

Here’s our top tips to maximise your recovery

  1. Keep hydrated, drink plenty of fluids following the race and in the days after.
  2. Take a bath in Epsom salts and alternate this with a contrasting cool bath or shower to really stimulate circulation.
  3. Make sure you keep moving. However tempting it is to just collapse in an exhausted heap and have a few relaxing days, if you can keep your body lightly active it will help your recovery. Doing some gentle alternative exercise such as swimming or yoga can really help in the week or so after an event. It can take about 2 weeks post marathon for your muscles to return to full strength, so ease back into running gradually.
  4. Increase your protein intake following the event to aid the recovery process.
  5. Invest in a post event sports massage. This will help ease any muscle stiffness and soreness, and improve recovery rate. The best timing for a light massage is 1 to 3 days post event, or 3 to 5 days post event for a deeper tissue massage. You can also use a foam roller, massage stick or massage ball to ease up and loosen out tight areas.

Read More: Exercise Pain – What you need to know about DOMS

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