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New Exercise Program

Posted on 6th February 2020 by

Exercise is almost always a key part of your recovery if you’ve had an injury. Exercises can be used to help improve your strength, flexibility, movement control, posture, balance and no end of other ways. We make sure that all our patients receive a customised set of exercises, designed to help you the most depending on what stage of receiver you’re at, your lifestyle, normal activity levels and the exact type of injury you have.

We’re always looking for ways to improve what we’re doing here at goPhysio.

We’ve recently updated the software we use to send you your bespoke exercise program.

After your appointment, your Therapist will send you an email with details of your exercise program. The email will include a link directly to your exercises, where it says ‘You can access your online report here.’ The email will also contain the name of your exercise program and a user name and password, so you can log in to access your exercises directly. (You can change these log in details once you’ve logged in the first time to something more memorable).



Once you have your log in details, you can now access your exercise program through our website, by clicking on the ‘Your Exercises’ tab.


goPhysio Exercises

This will take you to your log in page.


Once you have logged in, you will be able to see your recommended exercises, print them and even watch video demonstrations.


goPhysio exercises

There is also an app version for Apple and Android. For user ease, we’d recommend you set your own user name and password through the email link before using the app (as the issued ones are pretty lengthy!) as you need to enter this every time you access the app.

If you forget your user name or password at any point, please just send us an email or access your original email for your exercises.

goPhysio Physiotec

Love Your Bones – World Osteoporosis Day

Posted on 20th October 2019 by

Today is World Osteoporosis Day.World Osteoporosis day

Osteoporosis is a condition that weakens the bones, causing them to become less dense and therefore more fragile and easily broken.

We will naturally lose some bone density as we age but in some people this occurs more rapidly and is then known as osteoporosis or osteopenia (a milder form). This affects more than 3 million people in the UK and its thought 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis.

COULD YOU BE AT RISK OF OSTEOPOROSIS & FRACTURES?

Find out whether any of these common risk factors apply to you here.

You may be at higher risk of osteoporosis if:

  • You have low body weight or history of anorexia
  • You had an early menopause or hysterectomy
  • You don’t get enough vitamin D and calcium in your diet
  • You smoke or drink over the recommended limit of alcohol a week
  • You’ve had long course of steroid based medication or cancer treatment

Most people don’t know they have osteoporosis until they break a bone but it can be diagnosed by a DEXA scan which looks at your bone density.

If you have osteoporosis your GP may prescribe medications such as alendronic acid which helps slow the breakdown of bone, or calcium and vitamin D supplements which help build new bone. Eating a healthy well-balanced diet and avoid smoking and alcohol are also likely to be beneficial.

Regular weight-bearing and resistance exercises have been shown to help stimulate our bones to grow stronger. The most suitable type of exercise will depend on how much bone density you have already lost, for example younger people with reasonable bone density but several risk factors would benefit from higher impact training such as running, circuit training, tennis and football.

However, if you already have been diagnosed with osteoporosis start with lower impact exercises such as walking, Pilates, tai chi, gentle dance classes and lifting light weights to build your bones up more gradually.

Our Positive Steps classes are a perfect place to start, aimed at the over 60’s we combine seated and standing resistance exercises with balance and flexibility work. We run 2 classes a week, and each class is small and friendly where in a fun and relaxed atmosphere you’ll be feeling the benefits straight away. Try a class for free, just call us on 023 8025 3317 to book a free place!

If you are unsure what’s the best type of exercise for you consult your GP or come along and see one of our Physiotherapists.

World Osteoporosis Day

Osteoporosis Fracture Risk

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More Pilates Exercises In Standing

Posted on 1st October 2019 by

Mat based Pilates exercise are carried out in a variety of positions, including lying on your back, front or side, sitting and kneeling on hands and knees. In addition to these positions, there are many popular Pilates exercises you can do in standing.

Here’s a few of our Pilate’s teams favourites!

#1 Mermaid Standing

  1. Stand with your feet slightly wider than hip distance apart. Imagine your head is a helium balloon to lengthen your spine. Imagine your pelvis as a bowl resting upright to align your pelvis in the neutral position. Gently set your centre. Glide your shoulder blades downwards towards your waist. Place your hands on the brim of your pelvic bowl.
  2. INHALE and lift the left arm to the side and overhead.
  3. EXHALE and lengthen the curve of the spine to the right while maintaining the neutral position.
  4. INHALE and return back to upright starting position.

#2 Corckscrew Warm Up Move

  1. Standing upright, back of the neck long, shoulder blades set, neutral spinal position, knees soft, weight placed evenly through the feet. Arms resting long beside the body. Centre set.
  2. Inhale, circle the arms outwards and upwards overhead. Keep the arms within your peripheral vision and the shoulder blades set, so pulled back and down.
  3. Exhale, fold the arms and place the hands at the base of the head. Keep the back of the neck long.
  4. Inhale, glide the shoulder blades upwards. Keep the collarbones wide.
  5. Exhale, glide the shoulder blades downwards. Keep the collarbones wide.
  6. Inhale, reach the arms overhead. Keep the arms within the peripheral vision and the scapulae set.
  7. Exhale, circle the arms outwards and downwards to return to the starting position.

#3 One Leg Circle

  1. Start in a natural standing posture. Hands on your waist.
  2. Put your feet and heels together. Keeping your heels together, turn your feet outwards slightly.
  3. Inhale, slide your right leg forwards keeping the toes on the mat.
  4. Exhale, circle your right leg outwards, placing your foot directly behind your right hip. Keep the toes in contact with the mat.
  5. Inhale, slide your right leg forwards, placing your floor directly in front of your right hip. Keep the toes in contact with the mat.
  6. Repeat up to ten times in this direction and then reverse the direction of your leg circles on both sides.

#4 Clam Level 3

  1. Start in a natural standing position.
  2. Bend your right hip 45 and the knee to 90 degrees, keeping your legs a hip distance apart.
  3. Put your hands on your waist. Inhale to prepare.
  4. Exhale, rotate your right hip outwards, keeping your pelvis stable.
  5. Inhale, rotate your right hip back to the middle, keeping the pelvis stable.
  6. Repeat up to ten times on the right leg and then repeat on the opposite side.

#5 Roll Down

  1. Stand in a natural standing position. Engage your core.
  2. Inhale to prepare.
  3. Exhale, lengthen the back of the neck and curl the head and neck forwards. Continue to curl the body forwards, one bone at a time. Wheel the pelvis forwards and continue to roll the body downwards as far as comfortable. Allow the head and arms to relax forwards with gravity and keep the knees soft.
  4. Inhale and hold the roll down position.
  5. Exhale, draw the tailbone downwards and wheel the pelvis upwards. Continue to roll the spine upwards one bone at a time. Lengthen the upper body upwards and widen the collarbones to return to the starting position.
  6. Repeat 3 5 times.

Read More 

We have lot’s of informative and educational Pilates articles over on our blog, which you can find here

If you’re interested in finding out more about joining our specialist Clinical Pilates classes at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, take a look at the details of what we offer, our timetable of over 20 classes a week and more information about getting started with mat Pilates.

Read More

Top 3 Pilates exercises in standing


Back To School Pilates Offer

Posted on 20th August 2019 by

It’s coming to the end of the school holidays, time to start thinking about YOU again!

September can be a great time to start something new, it’s a time of natural change and fresh starts, new timetables and schedules. Maybe you have more free time for yourself with a little one starting school or gaining more independence going to senior school or college, or even university!

Have you thought about starting or re-starting Pilates? Perhaps you used to do Pilates and would love to get back to it? Pilates is a fantastic form of exercise. It’s a whole body workout, helping you get stronger, leaner, more flexible and helping you invest in your health. Even better, it’s sociable and fun!

We’ve got a very special offer for you and a friend!

What’s the offer?

For the total price of £300, you and your friend will both recieve:

  1. A 30 minute 1-2-1 Pilates session to get you started
  2. 3 consecutive months of Pilates classes, with a dedicated space every week in your chosen class from our timetable
  3. A pair of Pilates socks
  4. Access to our special Pilates membership (5% discount off all services, special offer of the month, monthly Pilates newsletter with exercises for home practice)
  5. The option to continue Pilates at a special reduced monthly rate of £55/month (normally £60/month).

That’s £300 between you – so only £150 each! A saving of over £150 off our normal price. If you haven’t got a friend to join you, you can pay £150 for an individual package.

We only have 10 of these special offers available, so be quick, once they’re gone they’re gone.

Read more about our range of specialist Pilates classes here. You can also take a look at our timetable.

Our Pilates classes offer:

  • 20 classes a week for all abilities
  • A dedicated place in your chosen class every week
  • A ‘make up’ class system, so you don’t loose any missed classes
  • Small classes, so you get individual attention and guidance
  • Clinically trained Instructors, specialists in helping and preventing injuries (with on hand advice every week!)
  • A spacious, fully equipped, air conditioned studio

To take advantage of this offer, please call us on 023 8025 3317 to have a chat, book your 1-2-1’s and find out what classes we have spaces in.

T&Cs

  • Offer only open to new members, existing members do not qualify for this offer
  • Payment of £300 for 2 people (or £150 for 1 person) is to be taken upfront. This is non refundable
  • Offer expires 30th November 2019
  • 3 month’s of classes include September, October and November 2019
  • Any unattended classes can not be carried over, however, you can ‘make up’ unattended classes as long as 24 hours notice is given
  • Classes are non-transferable


Osteoarthritis & How Pilates Can Help You

Posted on 1st August 2019 by

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects over 10 million people in the UK alone. OA can cause joint pain and discomfort where the smooth surface of the joints wears away over time, often referred to as “wear and tear”. Knees and hips are 2 of the most commonly affected joints.

Pilates for arthritis

If you have pain caused by OA, you can enter a bit of a negative cycle, where your pain stops you being so active or makes you fearful of activity, you move and exercise less and your muscles become weaker and your joints stiffer. This in turn can cause your more symptoms.

However, research has shown that exercise is the most effective non-drug treatment for reducing pain and increasing movement in patients with OA.

What this means is that it is perfectly safe and in fact, highly recommend to continue exercising and being active, even when you have pain or stiffness with your OA. If you’ve never exercised, starting activities that will strengthen your muscles will be extremely helpful.

Pilates is an excellent choice of exercise for people who have OA, as it is a gentle, low impact-based exercise, that combines weight-bearing with range of movement and strengthening exercises. Pilates can also be adapted to suit each person, tailoring the exercises to each person’s abilities within the limits of their movement and pain.

By having stronger muscles supporting the joints, you will be able to move and function more efficiently, which longer term will reduce the level of pain and discomfort you may experience. Over time, you may find that this has an impact on other activities, such as walking further or being able to climb the stairs more comfortably.

Physio and Pilates Instructor Kim, has put together some beginner level Pilates exercises you could try if you have OA in your knees or hips.

#1 Clam Level 1

  1. Lie on your side with your shoulders and hips stacked, with your underneath arm outstretched in alignment with your trunk. Ensure your back is in neutral and your centre is engaged. Bend your hips to approx.45 degrees and bend your knees to 90 degrees.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, lift the top knee upwards keeping the feet together.
  4. INHALE, lower the top knee onto the bottom leg.
  5. Repeat on the other side.

#2 Hip Twist Level 2

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre engaged.
  2. Place your arms out to the sides just below shoulder height, palms facing upwards. Connect your legs together and hold a small block or light book between your knees.
  3. INHALE to prepare.
  4. EXHALE, roll both knees to the right, continue to roll your pelvis, waist and then lower back towards the right. Finally, roll your head and neck towards your opposite shoulder, keeping your neck long.
  5. INHALE and hold.
  6. EXHALE, roll your head and neck back to the midline. Finally, roll your lower back, waist, pelvis and then legs back towards the midline.
  7. Repeat alternating sides.

#3 One Leg Stretch Level 1

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre Engaged.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, slide your left heel forwards along the floor.
  4. INHALE, slide your left heel back along the floor.
  5. Repeat alternating legs.

#4 Scissors Level 1

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre Engaged.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, slide your right foot inwards towards your sitting bone and float this leg into tabletop.
  4. INHALE and hold the tabletop position.
  5. EXHALE, lower your right leg to the mat.
  6. Repeat alternating legs.

If you have OA and would like some guidance and support on exercising, getting more active and what it’s recommended you do to help you be active with OA, please give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to have a chat.


Science & Exercise – getting you the best results!

Posted on 28th March 2018 by

When we are putting together an exercise based rehab programme for you as part of your recovery, there’s a lot that goes on behind it. To get you the best possible results and outcome, we want you to be working on the right things in the right way, not only helping you recover from your injury but helloing you building term, physical durability.

At goPhysio your bespoke programme will be constructed and tailored specifically to you using evidence-based research.

Here you can see an example of the top five exercises proven to target the glutes and hamstrings most effectively.

Hamstring Muscle activation

Gluteus Medius muscle activation

Gluteus maximus muscle activation

So, if you want an effective recovery plan from your injury, read more about our bespoke small group rehabilitation here.


National Bed Month

Posted on 1st March 2018 by

This month reminds us of how important a good nights’ sleep really is and how it benefits our health, as it’s National Bed Month! 

So what’s so important about sleep?!

 Sleep and the Brain

  • Sleep enhances your learning and problem-solving skills and helps you pay attention, make decisions and be creative.
  • Sleep deficiency can make it difficult to control your emotions and behaviour or cope with change. It has also been linked to depression and risk-taking behaviour.
  • Sleep is involved in the healing and repair of your heart and blood vessels. Without it, there is an increased risk of heart/kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and stroke.
  • Deep sleep triggers the release of hormones that promote healthy growth and development. This hormone also boosts muscle mass and helps repair cells.

Sleep and Athletic Performance

  • Sleep deprivation negatively effects athletic performance, especially in submaximal, prolonged exercise.
  • Compromised sleep can influence learning, memory, cognition, pain perception, immunity and inflammation.
  • Changes in glucose metabolism and neuroendocrine function as a result of chronic, partial sleep deprivation can result in alterations in carbohydrate metabolism, appetite, food intake and protein synthesis.

Sleep and Weight Loss

  • Sleep is crucial in retaining energy and stamina throughout the day.
  • There are two key hormones released when you sleep; ghrelin and leptin.
  • Ghrelin enhances your appetite and leptin suppresses it. A lack of sleep disturbs this natural hormonal balance and can lead to weight gain (or a lack of weight loss).
  • Growth hormone, released in abundance when we sleep, is responsible for facilitating muscle growth and increasing your metabolism which means energy is burned more efficiently and can lead to weight loss.
  • Adequate sleep lowers the level of cortisol (the stress hormone) in your body. Higher cortisol = lower metabolism. More sleep = less cortisol, better weight loss.

Morning Mobility Routine

Laying horizontally for an extended period of time can cause your joints and muscles to feel achy or stiff in the morning. Getting into a morning routine will increase your range of motion, decrease stiffness associated pain and boost the longevity of your global joint health.

  1. After a warm shower, take each major joint through its full, pain-free range of motion.
  2. Gently stretch those achy muscles.
  3. Use a foam roller or tiggerpoint ball to target the areas that need some extra attention.
  4. Perform daily to assist in retaining your range of motion.

6 Tips for a Better Kip

  1. Bedroom – clean, peaceful & welcoming. Achieve complete darkness with blackout blinds. Ideal temperature 16-18° Avoid televisions, computers and any distractions if you can’t nod off. Limit the bedroom for sleep only, it shouldn’t be used for work, watching TV, eating, even talking on the phone.
  2. Bed – comfortable! If you regularly wake up with aches and pains, it may be time to change your mattress. You should consider changing your bed after 7 years.
  3. Lifestyle – today’s typically fast-paced and chaotic lifestyle provides non-stop stimulation from the moment we wake up. Reduce the intensity of artificial light, maintain a regular bed time routine, avoid alcohol/caffeine before bed, switch off your tech, and empty your bladder before sleeping.
  4. Stress & worry – scientific evidence has shown a direct link between anxiety and rhythm of sleep. An alert mind produces beta waves, preventing sleep. To relax, breathe in deeply for 4 seconds and then breathe out slowly. Repeat until you feel your heart rate slowing.
  5. Diet – you are what you eat! Food and drink can have a drastic effect on your sleep. Choose milk, cherries, chicken and rice. Avoid fatty meat, curry and alcohol after 6pm.
  6. Exercise – promote sleep by working out effectively. Don’t work out too aggressively, this will be counterproductive by increasing your alertness. Yoga is renowned for its relaxation and sleep benefits.

Read more about the 4 pillars of a healthy life and ‘being well’ on a previous blog.

Why sleeps the magic elixir for runners.

 


Treatment of Calf Pain in Runners

Posted on 11th August 2017 by

Calf pain for runners is common complaint. Your calf muscles are used extensively and repeatedly during running, so it’s no surprise that sometimes they can become overloaded and develop pain. Here’s a great infographic from Tom Goom from the PhysioEdge series of podcasts, that highlights the recommendations for the treatment of calf pain.

So, what does it mean for you if you’re a runner with calf pain?

  1. Exercise Therapy is a crucial part of the treatment of calf pain. Exercises should be specifically targeted to increase your calf’s capacity for the demands of running. There are some great examples below. Your Physio would be able to identify exactly where any weakness may lie and subsequently advise on the most effective exercises for you. It may not only be your calf muscles that are weak, muscles around your hip and knee support the work of the calves during running, so strengthening these muscles is crucial too. Pilates is great for this! And don’t forget your feet. Working on the static strength of the muscles in your feet that bend your toes can help your running technique.
  2. Neural Mobility is how well your nerves ‘slide’ or move in your body. We all know that our joints and muscles move and stretch but our nerves also have to be able to move freely. When they don’t, this itself can cause pain and restricted flexibility. Reduced neural mobility may not be local to your calf, it could be originating from a more central source (your back/spine). Your Physio would be able to identify whether you have reduced neural mobility and advise on the best exercises to improve neural mobility. It may be that some manual therapy would help too.
  3. Training Loads, so distance, time, speed, terrain, will all have an impact on calf pain. Our aim is to always try and keep you running wherever we can (always keeps runners happy!). So, we offer customised advice in modifying your load to keep you running whilst your calf pain is addressed. This is not always possible though and there are cases where resting from running and doing some specific rehabilitation is essential to your recovery.
  4. Gait Retraining can have a massive impact on recovery and prevention of calf pain. Your running technique and style can improve your efficiency of your running and reduce demands on the structures involved in running. Here at goPhysio we offer a specialist Running Rehab service, where a biomechanical and video running analysis is carried out to guide any beneficial changes to your running technique. Small adjustments to technique can often have a massive impact on your running.

Treatment of calf pain in runners

The trap many runners fall into when they get calf pain is to stop running, rest completely until their pain is gone and then go straight back to their normal running routine. Then they’re frustrated when the pain comes back again and they repeat the cycle. When you pick up an injury, particularly an overuse injury like calf pain, it is crucial to identify and address the cause to prevent the potential long term cycle of injury.

Read More

What’s physiotherapy got do with a dripping tap? Overuse injuries explained.

Top 6 Pilates Exercises for Runners

Top Tips for Injured Runners

Running Rehab Service


New exercise class for back pain sufferers in Chandlers Ford

Posted on 17th May 2017 by

Back pain affects nearly everyone at some point in their life. After stress, back pain is the second most common reason for taking time off of work, with some 4 million working days lost through back pain every year. Unfortunately for some people, back pain can become a recurrent & persistent part of their life.

There isn’t always an obvious cause of back pain, and many factors such as poor posture, working conditions, driving and lifting can all contribute.

Research has shown though that staying physically active is the key to helping back pain. Recent guidelines from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommend that regular physical activity & exercise in combination with education can help people manage their low back pain.

It is based on these guidelines that here at goPhysio, we have developed a new educational & exercise course called Active Backs.

Paul Baker, goPhysio’s Clinical Director, says

“So many people we see are afraid to move when they have back pain. They are scared they are going to cause more damage. As long as anything serious has been ruled out, movement is the key to helping improve your back pain in the long term.”

“All the research agrees that by being educated how to manage your back pain and learning how to exercise correctly, you will be able to gain confidence in using your back correctly. This will help you not only reduce your pain but also prevent it coming back again.”

The programme is thought to be the first one of it’s kind in the area. Classes are run every Tuesday from 11.15am – 12.15pm.

Active Backs will include both an educational element, covering weekly topics such as posture, coping strategies and relaxation. It will also include a weekly exercise circuit to help strengthen and stretch your muscles and improve your fitness. Through coming to Active Backs we aim to help you achieve your goals.

The course will be run by one of our dedicated Clinicians and numbers are limited to six, to ensure that everyone receive the individual attention they require. It is going to be held in our new ‘Strong Room’. fully equipped with resistance training, weights, balls and mats, and equipment designed to help you get the most from exercising for your spine.

For details on how to book, please take a look here. All bookings are easily managed online and you can have maximum flexibility with bookings and even combine with some yoga classes.

Read More 

Latest NICE guideline for back pain & sciatica

10 things you need to know about your back

Help I’ve got back pain, what should I do?


 


5 Tips To Survive On The Slopes This Winter

Posted on 28th December 2016 by

Many of us will be packing our bags and heading for the slopes in the new year, but how do we make sure we come back injury free?

#1: Preparation

A week on the slopes can be exciting, exhilarating, and for most of us – completely exhausting! 6-8 hours a day of aerobic exercise requiring good balance, strength and flexibility – it’s often a lot more than our office jobs demand of us! So to get the most out of your holiday start your preparation early – ideally this should begin 6-12 weeks before your fit the slopes depending on your base level of fitness. If you have any niggling injuries try to get them seen to by a physio ASAP before you go to give yourself maximum chance of recovery rather than leaving it until the week before!

Key areas to tackle in your ski-fit workout include:

Aerobic fitness – cycling, running, cross trainers or step machines are great to build up your aerobic capacity and get those legs working at the same time, if your gym has a ‘ski trainer’ machine even better!

Strength training – focus on the quads and gluts with the following easy exercises you can do at home:

Skiing Exercises

Step downs: standing with one foot on a step facing forwards, slowing lower yourself down to tap the heel of the other foot to the floor, then bring it back on the step. Try to keep your pelvis level and your standing knee in line with your 2nd toe as you do this!

 


skiing exercises

Lateral step downs: with one foot on a step facing sideways, slowly bend your knee to tap te heel of the other foot to the ground. Try to keep your pelvis level and your standing knee in line with your 2nd toe as you do this!


ski injury prevention exercises

Backward lunges: From a standing position step back into a lunge, dropping the back knee towards the floor. Try to keep your pelvis level and your standing knee in line with your 2nd toe as you do this!


 

Bridge exerciseBridge: Laying on your back, squeeze your buttocks and lift your hips off
the ground, hold for 5 seconds then slowly lower.


Clam exercise

Clam: Lay on one side with your knees bent and feet together, make sure your hips are stacked one on top of the other then slowly lift your top knee and lower.

 


 

Flexibility – ankle and hip flexibility is essential for efficient skiing, try these stretches:

Soleus stretch: Stand with one foot in front of the other, bend both knees until you feel a stretch in the lower part of the calf on the back leg. Hold 30secs.

Soleus stretch


Glut stretch: Lay on your back, cross one foot over the other thigh to feel the stretch in your buttock, to increase this stretch pull that other thigh in towards your chest. Hold 30secs.

glute-stretch


Adductor stretch: Stand with your legs wide apart, lunge to one side taking the weight over the knee, keep both feet facing forwards. Hold 30 secs.

Adductor stretch


If you want to have some expert guidance in a more supportive setting, we run specialist exercise based group rehab, where we can put together a bespoke exercise plan for you to work on under our supervision in our Strong Room. You can read more about this specialist service here.

#2: Warm up

Preparation done, don’t ruin your hard work by forgetting to warm up before you leave the chalet. Get all your joints (ankles, knees, hips, thoracic spine and shoulders) warmed up by taking them through their full range of motion several times. Squats, lunges, heel raises and upper body twists are all great to start firing those key muscle groups. It’s worth spending a good 5-10minutes on this before you head out, then repeat a couple when you get to the top of that chair lift if it’s been a long ride!

#3: Protection

If you’re carrying an injury be sure to strap yourself up; theres a huge range of knee braces, wrist guards and back protectors on the market so ask your physio if you’re not sure. And don’t forget that helmet!

#4: On the slopes

Remember you are most likely to injure yourself when your muscles are fatigued so regular breaks, good hydration (of the non-alcoholic variety!) and knowing when to call it a day are all essentials to not ruin your holiday on day 1! Well-fitting boots are also key to prevent blisters and sores that will hamper your ski style!

#5: Apres-ski

Stretching for a few minutes before you head to the bar is going to make your next day’s skiing a lot more comfortable, (see stretches above) and remember that alcohol is likely to affect you more at altitude, particularly after a full days exercise, so take it easy!

People who’ve read this article have also found the following useful:

Train for the slopes

The benefit of Pilates for Winter Sports

More about Physio Chris and his Snowsport experience