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Post COVID Recovery

Posted on 3rd July 2020 by

We’re staring to see (albeit online only if appropriate), a number of people who have had and are recovering from Coronavirus.

It certainly seems to have a really significant impact on people longer term, even those who may have had milder symptoms. We’ve put together some useful tips and advice, to help you be realistic about and optimise your recovery.

Why is rehabilitation important?

While you are recovering, focusing on taking some time for your recovery and rehabilitation is really important. Rehabilitation will improve your exercise tolerance, muscle strength and help manage any breathlessness and fatigue.

You should focus on breathing, functional and physical exercises. Here at goPhysio, we can help guide you on the best types of exercises either through our online service or face to face, if it’s appropriate. We will help to put together a rehabilitation programme that is tailored exactly to you and where you are and where you want to be.

Making sure you’re suitably hydrated and nourished play a really important role in your body’s response to and recovery from the COVID-19 virus. Eating well (together with the exercises) will help to rebuild your muscle strength and function.

REHABILITATION: The action of restoring someone to health or normal life through training and therapy.

What can I do to help myself?

Making sure you resume some ‘normality’ and routine is a great way to boost your recovery. Here’s a few tips:

  • Get up at a normal hour
  • Try and restart a regular morning routine e.g. wash, brush teeth, get dressed
  • Sit in a chair for meals
  • Follow advice on eating and drinking well
  • Think about keeping an exercise and activity diary

Why do I feel breathless?

Breathlessness is a very common symptom in some people with COVID-19. The lungs can become inflamed and the effort of breathing can increase. You may be breathing quicker and shallower, however it is important to try and stay calm. Anxiety can increase your heart rate and make your breathing rate increase further. This should improve over time. You can try some breathing control exercises to help.

Breathing control – something to help you relax

  1. Get in a comfortable position
  2. Close your eyes and bring your attention to your breathing
  3. Breathe in and out through your nose (or mouth if you are unable to do this)
  4. Try to breathe in for the count of one, and out for count of two, working towards a longer breath out than in, to slow your breathing rate down
  5. Notice areas of tension in the body and try to release this with each breath out
  6. Gradually try to make your breaths slower and deeper

You can try various positions if you[re feeling breathless, that you may find help ease the breathlessness. Try:

  1. Lying on your side, propped up with pillows with your knees bent a little
  2. Sit upright and lean forwards over a table onto some pillow and relax
  3. Stand and lean onto a windowsill or forwards onto a wall

Mobility & Exercise

Moving little and often will help with your breathing and get your muscles working again, easing stiffness, achey joints and improve your strength and flexibility. All of this will help you get back to doing the things you’ve missed. There are different levels of mobility you should slowly work towards.

  1. Sitting on the edge of your bed
  2. Standing up from sitting
  3. Getting out of your bed and sitting in a chair
  4. Walk within a small space
  5. Walk around your home
  6. Walk around your garden
  7. Climb stairs or steps
  8. Getting outside

Exercises

It is really important to do some regular exercises that will help with:

  • Building up your muscle strength
  • Improving your muscle flexibility
  • Working on exercise stamina and endurance
  • Regaining balance
  • Improving functional activities

Exercise Diary: you may find using an exercise diary helpful. You can track your exercises and score how hard you are working using the Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale (RPE Chart).

As you progress, you can increase the number of repetitions of exercises you are doing and increase the number of exercise sessions each day. Exercises should feel ‘light’ to between ‘somewhat hard’ and ‘hard’ (RPE 3 – 5), and your breathing should allow you to maintain uninterrupted conversation throughout.

“Little and often” is the best approach.

Managing Fatigue

You may notice that your energy levels are low and and that doing simple daily activities suddenly feel like you’re doing a marathon. Fatigue is a common symptom of COVID-19. Although rest is important in recovery, unlike normal tiredness it does not improve with rest alone.

Feelings of fatigue can be made worse if you’re still experiencing episodes of breathlessness, muscle de-conditioning from having spent long periods inactive and in bed and also from stress that you may be feeling after a period of illness.

What can I do about fatigue? Fatigue can make managing your usual daily tasks more difficult. All daily tasks require the body to use energy through moving and thinking. Fatigue management can help you to understand how to make the most of your body’s available energy. This can help you to find ways to balance your physical, social and emotional needs when your energy levels are reduced.

Rating your fatigue from 1-10 will help you identify patterns of fatigue. You can discuss this with your Occupational Therapist who will support you to identify strategies to manage your fatigue.

Completing a fatigue diary and rating your fatigue before and after an activity (e.g. having a wash and dressing) can help you to understand how different activities can affect your energy levels.

How to use a fatigue diary

  • Start at the beginning of each day
  • Write down each activity including rest period you havetaken in each three hour interval
  • Use a scale of 0 – 10 (0 = no fatigue, 10 = extreme fatigue) to score how you felt at the end of this three hour period
  • Record any other factors you feel are relevant e.g. stressful events, skipping meals, over-exertion
  • Use the diary to track your progress and work out any patterns and record how you’re progressing

If you need any support or help, we are here for you. Our range of skills and services, with both online and face to face options, provides a host of ways to support your recovery.

The best place to start would be on online or face to face assessment with one of our Physio’s so we can establish where you are in your recovery journey, find out what your goals are and put together a realistic and gradual way for you to achieve this.

Our support can include a specific and progressive exercise programme, which we can monitor and develop as you recover, ways to help any areas of pain, discomfort, stiffness or tension, advice on pacing and returning to work, hobbies and sport, whatever it is you’d like to do.

Just call us on 023 8025 3317 to find out more and boost your recovery.


Mental & Physical Health

Posted on 3rd July 2020 by

Never has it been so important to look after ourselves both physically and mentally.

Here is a fab infographic we came across, highlighting some great ways to boost your mental health.

  1. Mental and physical health ate both so important. The 2 can not be separated, they are so closely linked and although we may be more aware of our physical health, it is just as important to look after our mental and emotional health too.
  2. MOVE! Movement in itself is medicine, for both the body and mind. If it came in a magical pill format, it really wold be a wonder drug! Don’t worry if you’re not doing a daily online exercise video; a walk, a cycle, a play in the garden, a stretching session, gardening, DIY or just not sitting all day is good!
  3. Mindfulness doesn’t mean you have to sit and mediate. Just being aware of your surroundings, how you’re feeling and what you’re doing and making that connection to be aware is all that’s needed.
  4. Lot’s of people have used this opportunity to take up a new skill. Whether it’s sewing, volunteering, piano, gardening or home schooling! Mastering something new, however small, can really give you a boost! Anything you’d like to try but never had the chance?
  5. Give your life some meaning. Review your goals, where you want to be, what you want to be doing. What’s really important to you? Take some time to reflect and find ways, no matter how small, to bring some meaning into your life.

If you need some help supporting the physical side of your health, we’re here to help with a range of services. The emotional and mental benefits from the support we provide go hand in hand with the physical care.


Returning to Running After a Baby

Posted on 5th June 2020 by

One question we get asked a lot, is when it is safe to return to exercise, particularly running, after you’ve had a baby.

So, it was great to see a wonderful new infographic from 3 top specialist Physio’s in this area, which has been aligned with the Chief Medical Officers Physical Activity Guidelines.

It’s often really hard for new mum’s to judge and decide what exercise to do when they’ve just had a baby, so it’s great to have this guidance, in any easy to understand and clear format. Many turn to professionals like us for advice, which is great, but others can be confused and get conflicting advice.

Obviously, the guidance needs to be interpreted and followed based on individual circumstances, comfort and recovery.

But it certainly helps manage expectations. And, certainly for those that are super keen to get back to higher impact exercise, following the guide will help you plan a gradual build up.


Being Active at Home – A Guide for Older Adults

Posted on 31st May 2020 by

A new booklet, co-funded and developed by Sport England and Public Health England (PHE), has just been launched! It aims to help older adults keep up their activity levels while isolating due to coronavirus (Covid-19).

This is part of the Sport England Join the Movement campaign designed to provide inspiration and trusted information to the public about how to get active in and around the home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Being active is good for our physical and mental wellbeing. This is why we should all try to move regularly, including exercises to help stay strong and steady. This particularly applies to those of us who have health conditions or are older. Due to coronavirus we are all spending more time within our home, so it is important that we find ways to build activity into our day, every day.

Over the next few weeks, you may have health and social care appointments cancelled or delayed. If you are waiting for treatment, being active is one of the best things you can do to look after your health, as part of a healthy lifestyle. Being active at a level that feels comfortable is unlikely to make your health worse; in fact it can help to manage many health conditions.

Most of us are spending much more time within our home. This can be frustrating and upsetting, and it can be harder to be active when you can’t do your normal daily activities. This guide will help you to find ways to build activity into your day. If the exercise suggested doesn’t work for you, feel free to adapt them based on what you can do.

There’s some fantastic, simple strengthening and balance exercises.

As well as lot’s of general health and wellbeing advice.

If you’re struggling with your activities, we can help with providing an online video appointment or telephone support. So, do get in touch. You can call us on 023 8025 3317.


Working Out at Home, Injury Free

Posted on 29th April 2020 by

“Now more than ever, it’s important we look after ourselves.” This is the message we’re being given and great advice. Alongside following social distancing and isolation guidelines, looking after ourselves is absolutely key.

One of the main ways in which we can do this is by taking part in regular exercise and activity.

But, for many, this is such a big change in routine and habits, we may be finding ourselves doing something totally new. And this can take it’s toll on the human body.

Whether you’re doing Joe Wicks’ daily PE, running lot’s more to make the most of your ‘daily exercise’ or trying a new dance class online, you need to be just as careful!

So, what steps can you take to make sure you stay injury free?

  1. Start anything new gradually. You may be buzzing to do Joe Wicks 9am PE session every day, but if you’re not used to doing a 30 minute exercise session daily, you need to give your body some time to adapt.
  2. Pace yourself. Try and start with a spaced out schedule and build it up gradually. Your body really needs to be able to adapt gradually to the demands placed upon it
  3. Vary your activities. By all means, try a few online video home workouts, but mix it up by going for a walk or cycle (following latest social distancing rules), a bit or gardening, kick around with the kids or some spring cleaning!
  4. Listen to your body! The same principles to preventing injuries still apply! Lot’s of the exercise videos online are very heavy on the knees and hips, with lot’s of body weight exercises such as squats. lunges, high impact activities. These can really cause issues if you aren’t used to doing this type of exercise or do too many or too often.
  5. Don’t binge! Overall, as we’re not out and about so much, we are naturally moving less throughout the day. So, don’t be tempted to sit all day for hours on end and then suddenly jump up and do a 30 minute workout! It’s a good habit to move regularly throughout the day, so you’re keeping lightly active on a regular basis.

If you do find yourself with a new injury, a persistent ache or pain, then we’re still here for you. We can offer online video physio consultations – read more about these here.

If you’ve always thought about trying Pilates but never had the chance or are finding yourself with a bit more time, we also have a new Pilates Online service, with 4 new classes published every week and access to a whole library of Pilates classes. You can sign up here.

#StayHomeWorkOut


Staying Active During Isolation

Posted on 17th April 2020 by

As the coronavirus has spread across the World and lockdown continues, many more individuals are being asked to stay at home in order to protect themselves and others. Gyms, parks and other fitness/health facilities are closed for the time being. All of the sudden, everyone’s level of activity has been reduced, which can pose a significant challenge for our mental and physical well-being. 

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), “physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality”. 

Everyone, whether, they were active or not before the quarantine, needs to avoid this sudden sedentarism as much as possible. 

How much activity should I do? 

The recommendations are very simple: 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week, or a combination of both (WHO). Read more here.

That means you only need to do:

  • 3 x 50 min sessions a week or;
  • 5 x 30 min sessions a week or;
  • 7 x 22 min sessions a week 

in order to stay active, healthy and reduce your risk of mortality. 

What activities should I do?

There is plenty of activities you can do at home to keep yourself active:

  • Gardening: The Spring is coming; it is time to show off your gardening skills! Read more about gardening injury free here.
  • Walking: get up every 30 minutes, walk around the house, around the garden or up and down the stairs. Give your sofa a rest! Take inspiration from the legend Captain Tom!
  • Dancing: why not? The clubs are closed but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun at home. Get the whole family moving in a dance off competition!
  • Cleaning: now it’s your opportunity to finally get your garage or loft cleaned and organised. You’d be amazed at how much exercise a bit of cleaning actually involves.
  • Try an online exercise class or challenge: there is plenty of information online. You can look for videos on YouTube or sign up for online classes. You can also follow us on our Pilates Facebook Group or goPhysio Facebook Community Group, where we have been uploading exercises you can do at home, challenges and tips on how to manage your health during this quarantine. We’ve also just launched an online Pilates video platform, where you can have access to 16 new Pilates classes a month for just £29 with a FREE 7 day trial. Subscribe now here.

Being healthy is not only about physical activity. Mental health is very important and there’s plenty of ways you can exercise your mind:

  • Establish a routine: whether you’re still working from home or not, keep a routine. The disruption of your normal routine can leave you feeling lost, trying to figure out how to fill all the hours in the day. If you’re at home with the kids, try to plan out activities that will keep everyone busy so you can get some work done. Plan your day, make up your own routine to save you from the monotony. 
  • Be physically active: healthy body, healthy mind.
  • Communicate: time to catch up with old friends and family. Reach out to others. We are all going through the same, we all appreciate some talking. If you’re at home with the family, try to have your meals together and talk. No TV or phones allowed.
  • Relax: time to catch up with all the reading you wanted to do on holiday. Give meditation a try. Have you ever tried Yoga or Tai Chi? Now you’ve got the time, use it!
  • Practice mindfulness: use this time of enforced isolation to slow down and be mindful. We normally live such a fast paced life, we don’t have that luxury, so now’s a great time to give it a try! Read more here.
  • Laugh: time to watch you favourite comedy shows or movies, get the whole family together and play some board games, watch some funny videos and “memes” online. As Eric Idle once sang “Always look on the bright side of life”.

We are all in this together and soon we’ll be back to normality. 

Until then enjoy the gift of time. Use it wisely and stay active. 


Staying active whilst in isolation

Lessons from Life Lessons Festival

Posted on 17th February 2020 by

This weekend, I was lucky enough to be able to spend 2 days at the inaugural thought-led wellbeing event, Life Lessons, in London.

A jam packed weekend, there was a line up of world class speakers planned, grappling with topics such as philosophy, society, the mind, self-care, sustainability, psychology, nutrition and more.

goPhysio’s services centre around physical health, however, what’s becoming more and more evident and thankfully, more and more recognised, is that crucial connection between the mind and the body that can not be overlooked.

So, I thought I’d share some of the key messages from the weekend.

Saturday kicked off with Alain De Botton, from The School of Life, exploring emotional health. In fact, this happened to be my favourite lecture of the weekend, so a good one to start with. The School of Life is a global organisation helping people live more fulfilled lives. The key messages from Alan were:

  • We have become intolerant of anything other than perfection. The world has become radically unbalanced towards perfectionism. It’s what we expect, when actually we can be good enough, we don’t have to be perfect. An understanding and acceptance of this for both ourselves and others, would really be transformational.
  • We are all ‘weird’! There is no ‘normal’, we’re just different types of weird!!
  • There is no longer any time for deep thinking. We used to sit on the bus or in the car, daydream in the shower or during a walk. These times of deep thinking allowed our brains to process things and thoughts. But now we are in an era of information overload. We are constantly consuming, be it podcasts, TV, audiobooks, social media, 24 hour news, radio, the internet or books. Our minds don’t have any time to process anything!
  • This information overload stops us from ‘thinking’ in the day. A potential result of this is that at night, when our mind finally gets a break from information, the minds starts to go into thinking overdrive and can really disrupt our sleep (sound familiar?!).
  • We would all benefit from connecting with nature more. This connection, experiencing and acknowledging how ‘small’ humans are relative to the world, can really help to centre us.

Next up, was ‘Everything is figureoutable’ by Marie Forleo. She shared her 3 rules:

  1. All your problems and dreams are figureoutable
  2. If they aren’t figureoutable, it’s not a problem or a dream, it’s a fact of life, or
  3. You may just not care enough to figure it out. If so, find something else.

Her message was all about having self-belief, in that you have to believe you have what it takes to make things happen.

According to Maria, you are 42% more likely to achieve a goal if you write it down. So, if there’s something you are really serious about acheiving something, why not give it a go.


I am already a fan of Dr Rangan Chatterjee, so was delighted to hear him speak to Helen Russell and Mungi Ngomane. They discussed some fascinating ways in which different cultures and parts of the world achieve happiness!

These included Ubuntu, the art of human connection. The philosophy of “I am only because you are” and acknowledging that everyone impacts on your life seems extremely powerful. We seem to have all become too individualised. They also discussed the Japanese terms; Wabisabi, a view centred on the acceptance of transience and imperfection and Ikigi, a reason for being, encompassing joy, a sense of purpose and meaning and a feeling of well-being.

The key takeaway message was that we need to live well to be well. It’s almost come full circle, in that we are starting to get back to basics again and realising that these are the important things for wellbeing – eating well, sleeping well, exercising, connecting, talking, relaxing, reducing time on technology and getting into nature.


To finish off day 1, the very hilarious Romesh Ranganathan, was joined by a panel of very honest and open men, to discuss mental health. In light of the day’s news, of another unnecessary and early tragic loss of life of someone in the media, the discussion was very apt. Their messages all followed the same themes:

  1. Talk & listen more – we have to be having conversations and connecting with people
  2. Ask people of they’re OK and watch out for others
  3. You never know what people are going through or how they are really feeling, so have this in your mind

Day 2 started with an honest and frank discussion entitled “Wonderwomen at Work”. As the title suggested, this was all about the role, challenges and culture surrounding women at work. My favourite message in this talk was not to worry whether people actually like you. Just like you don’t necessarily like everyone, everyone won’t like you. But be nice, kind and likeable, and that’s all you can do!


The Brain Power talk was a much more scientifically focused session, which covered the impact of alcohol and smart drugs on brain power and steps we can take to boost brain power and future proof our brain function as we age.

So, what can we do to future-proof our brain?

  • Exercise
  • Eat a well balanced diet
  • Sleep well
  • Practice positive affirmations (a few talks mentioned this)
  • Meditate, learn a new skill or do something regularly that requires concentration

Not rocket science is it?! The things we should be doing to love well and improve our chances of living a long and happy life, are all pretty much the same! Chartered Psychologist Kimberley Wilson has a new book out soon (see the cover below for the details) and it sounds fascinating.


Anyone who has kids must have heard of Philipa Perry and her book that’s packed full of wisdom. She certainly lived up to expectations in person. She just talks sense! Her key messages when you’re dealing with your children (although I’m sure they could equally apply to communicating and interacting with anyone):

  1. Connection NOT Correction – find the mood of the person you’re interacting with, don’t deal with the facts. Try and connect with them.
  2. Provide boundaries & love. Teach emotional intelligence by demonstrating it and sharing your feelings.

Her book is an absolute must read!


The weekend was also peppered with yoga & barre classes, guided meditation and drop in sessions and discussions covering a huge range of topics, from overcoming anxiety to connecting your mind and body through exercise.

It really was a fascinating and inspiring weekend, with many takeaways that will undoubtedly be woven into not only my personal life but also what we provide here at goPhysio – so watch this space!

I’ll certainly be looking out for this event again.



#Lifelessonsfestival


Health matters: physical activity – prevention and management of long-term conditions, new guidance published

Posted on 29th January 2020 by

Public Health England has just launched a new publication Health matters: physical activity – prevention and management of long-term conditions

There are undeniably SO many benefits of being more active. These include:

  1. Reducing the risk of many long-term conditions
  2. Helping manage existing conditions
  3. Ensuring good musculoskeletal health
  4. Developing and maintaining physical and mental function and independence
  5. Supporting social inclusion
  6. Helping maintain a healthy weight

One in 3 adults in England live with a long-term health condition, such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer or a neurological disorder. These people are twice as likely to be amongst the least physically active. However, evidence shows that regular physical activity can help prevent or manage many common conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It can also help with many of the symptoms of these long-term conditions and prevent further complications or problems developing.

What we love about the new publications, is the focus is becoming more about PHYSICAL ACTIVITY and not just exercise. Exercise is only one way of being physically active, so it’s great to see more attention being paid to this.

So, what constitutes PHYSICAL ACTIVITY?

  • Active living – so going about your daily life more actively! Getting out for a walk, sitting less, gardening or household chores, even going shopping can be fairly active (particularly when you compare it to internet shopping!!).
  • Active travelling – getting on your bike, walking, getting off the bus a stop earlier and thinking twice before hopping in the car – great for the planet too!
  • Active recreation – getting out to walk the dog, a social walk or cycle with friends, trying a new activity like climbing, bouldering or dry slop skiing!
  • Active Sport – Either informal, a game of rounders at the park, a kick around in the garden or a go on your kid’s trampoline. Or organised sport such as playing as part of a team, going to an exercise class or taking part in an event.

So, what should we be doing?

The guidelines state that for good physical and mental health, adults should aim to be physically active every day. Any activity is better than none, and more is better still.

There are 3 elements of the physical activity guidelines:

  1. Strengthening activity – Muscle strength, bone health and the ability to balance are crucial to physical function. It is important that strengthening activities are important throughout your life for different reasons.
  2. Cardiovascular activity – A combination of moderate, vigorous and very vigorous intensity activity is recommended.
  3. Sedentary time – Adults should aim to minimise the amount of time spent being sedentary, and should break up long periods of inactivity with at least light physical activity.

With a bit of creativity, lateral thinking, small changes to your daily routines and habits, it is easy to increase the levels of physical activity in your life.

You simply can not argue with the potential benefits to your health and wellness. If activity were a ‘medicine’ it would be a miracle! So, how can you not find the time or a way?!

How can we help?

Increasing physical activity is woven into everything we do at goPhysio.

  1. If you’re in pain or injured, one of the consequences is that you are unable to be as physically active as you’d like to be or should be. By helping reduce your pain and helping you recover from your injury fast, we’ll get you back to being active again! Our Physio or Sports Therapy team are on hand to quickly and accurately assess and diagnose your injury. We’ll put in place a realistic recovery plan. No GP referral is needed and we aim to offer appointments within 24 hours, so you don’t need to face any delays. Book your appointment online here.
  2. If you’re approaching your latter years, we offer a specialised exercise class for those 60+, designed exactly to target the recommended guidelines above. Positive Steps runs on a Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday from 11am – 12pm. Your first class is free, so just give us a call to book in a taster class.
  3. We run a comprehensive exercise based rehab service. This is a great way to build and develop strength, recover from a new or recurrent injury and help prevent injuries by getting your body stronger. Read more about rehab here.
  4. Pilates is a wonderful gentle way to exercise, that can be adapted for all ages and abilities. It works on strength, flexibility and balance and also gives some mental space and focus, with time to invest and focus on yourself. We run 20 classes a week in Chandlers Ford and offer flexible options for bookings. You can read all about our Pilates classes here.

Whatever you love to do, we’re here to help and support you in staying active and getting more active, so you can live an active, healthy, positive life, pain & injury free.

#LoveActivity



Why it’s great to run!

Posted on 5th December 2019 by

We are delighted to be partnering up with the Hendy Eastleigh 10k again for 2020, as we become theEastleigh 10k goPhysio official Health Partner of the race for the third year.

One of the largest 10k road races in the country, the Hendy Eastleigh 10k is a fantastic event.

With just over 3 months to go until the Hendy Eastleigh 10k it is never to late to get your running shoes on and get going!

Still need convincing? Here’s a few reasons from our team why running is such a great form of exercise.

Why it’s great to run!

Running is one of the best forms of aerobic exercise for physical conditioning of the heart and lungs. Studies have shown that running has huge health benefits and it can help you experience more energy, patience, humour and creativity. It can even make you happier! So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running.

Running improves your health Running is a fantastic way to increase your overall health. Research shows that running can raise your levels of good cholesterol, increase lung function, boost your immune system & lower your risk of cardiovascular diseases. running can even fortify your immune system by accelerating the circulation of protective cells.

Running is great for your heart It’s the king of cardio. Running, even 30 minutes or so a few days a week, can help prevent or reduce high blood pressure. According to a landmark study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, running is associated with a drastically reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Running makes you happier The rush of chemicals (endorphins) your body experiences after a run can give you a ‘runners high’. Running can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. A recent study even found that just 30 minutes of running a week, for three weeks, can boost sleep quality, mood and concentration during the day.

It’s easy and convenient Whatever your schedule, you can always squeeze in a run. Just put on your trainer’s and off you go! You can even run whilst your kids cycle or with a baby in a pushchair, take your dog or run your commute!

It’s a cheap way to exercise No gym membership, joining fees or sneaky add-ons. Just the occasional pair of trainers every 500 miles or so, means running is a cost effective way to exercise regularly.

Running seriously torches calories Running is a great calorie burn. It’s one of the best forms of exercise for losing or maintaining consistent weight. The bonus is that the calorie burn continues after you stop running and regular running boosts this “after-burn”, amplifying the effects even more.

It’s a killer leg workout Your body’s biggest muscles are all in your legs and running benefits them all, it’s a great workout to strengthen these important muscles.

You can do it right now Running is such a natural motion, you don’t need to invest in special In the early stage, depending on your targets, you don’t need lessons like many other sports, as running is such a natural motion, just pop on your trainer’s and away you go.

Running strengthens your joints and bones It’s long been known that running helps increases bone mass, and even helps stem age-related bone loss or osteoporosis. It’s also great news for your knees, as a recent study found runners were half as likely to suffer with knee arthritis compared with walkers.

Running can add years to your life It’s recommended that we do at least 30 minutes of exercise, 5 times a week. Making sure you meet these recommendations will help you live a long and healthy life!

Running works your core A surprise to some, but running actually works your core too. The rotation in your spine as you run, challenges your core muscles, helping strengthen your spine. Running on uneven surfaces provides an extra challenge.

Running helps mental health We all live in a busy, stressful time. Running provides the opportunity to take some time purely for yourself, away from your phone, emails, colleagues and kids. You can get primitive with running, giving your brain space to recharge. It can help you to unwind and relax. It’s difficult to come back after a run stressed!

Running improves your sleep Feeling tired from exercise improves your ability to fall and stay asleep. Improving the quality of your sleep is now thought to be a fundamental part of your health and wellbeing. It is even thought that running can help cure insomnia!

Running boosts your confidence Running can boost your confidence and self-esteem. By setting and achieving goals, you can help give yourself a greater sense of empowerment that can leave you much happier and improve your overall feeling of wellbeing and mental health.

It’s a world of discovery Explore new parks, hidden tracks, forests, beaches, river paths, the list goes on. You can run anywhere, any time and enjoy the change of seasons and all the elements as you do.

Running boosts your memory Running can stimulate brain growth as it helps stimulate an increase in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which encourages neural growth.

Running is a great way to socialise Runners, love nothing more than talking to runners about running. There are so many social aspects to running, whether it’s joining a running club, taking part in a Parkrun or training for an event, there’s a lot of support and camaraderie found amongst runners.

There you have it! Many ways in which running can help you become healthier and happier. Every time you run, you’ll improve your resting heart rate, your body will release endorphins, your legs will get stronger and you’ll burn a whole lot of calories. In the end you’ll be happier, fitter and stronger! Remember the key to better health is right under your toes……

So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running. You’ll thank yourself for it!

Enter the Hendy Eastleigh 10k here.


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Strong, Steady & Straight – Benefit of Pilates for Osteoporosis

Posted on 1st October 2019 by

Osteoporosis, although a well known condition, comes with much worry and fear surrounding it about physical activity and exercise. A diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia (reduced bone density on a less severe scale than osteoporosis), can often conjure up thoughts of being fragile and fearful of doing too much or exercises that might be harmful.

So, it’s great to see some updated guidance around exercise and physical activity for osteoporosis. The guidance is structured around 3 important themes:

  1. STRONG – the types and amount of exercise and physical activity needed to promote bone strength.
  2. STEADY – the importance of including exercise and physical activity to reduce falls and resulting fractures.
  3. STRAIGHT – a focus on ‘spine care’, keeping the back straight. A positive approach to bending, moving and lifting safely to reduce the risk of vertebral fracture, improve posture and relieve pain after vertebral fracture.

The key principles of the guidance include some important messages:

  • Physical activity and exercise has an important role in the management of osteoporosis – promoting bone strength, reducing falls risk and managing symptoms.
  • People with osteoporosis should be encouraged to do more rather than less. This should be supported with a positive and encouraging approach – ‘how to’ rather than ‘don’t do’.
  • Physical activity and exercise is not associated with significant harm – though some caution is advised, the benefits of physical activity and exercise outweigh the risks. Seek specialist support and advice to help you exercise in the most beneficial way.
Physical activity and exercise for osteoporosis

This makes Pilates a fantastic option as the main aims of Pilates are: 

  • Strengthen your muscles
  • Improve your balance
  • Improve you posture.  

Notice any similarities?!

Not only that, Pilates doesn’t involve any sudden impact so further reduces the risks of fractures associated to osteoporosis.

The added benefit of Pilates at goPhysio is that our classes are taken by a rehab professional with experience of treating patients with osteoporosis amongst other common conditions.

You can find out more about our Pilates classes here.

Read More

Love Your Bones – World Osteoporosis Day

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