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Why ‘Lean Muscle Mass’ Is So Important

Posted on 1st October 2020 by

As it’s International Day For Older People, it’s a good chance to focus on what helps people stay fit, healthy and active into the later years. We all know that it’s important to eat well, stay active, avoid too much alcohol, not smoke and to try and maintain a good body weight.

However, although there’s a big focus on body weight, what doesn’t get much attention is how much lean muscle mass you have or should have.

What is lean muscle mass?

Lean Muscle Mass Lean muscle mass is the amount of muscle that makes up your body composition. So you could have 2 people who look fairly similar from the outside or weigh the same, however, if you analysed the muscle mass of both people, one could have a much larger muscle mass and one a lower muscle mass underneath the skin.

Take a look at the images on the left. In the middle picture is the cross section of the leg of a sedentary 74 year old. You will see their thigh bone in the centre, surrounded by their quadriceps muscles (thigh muscles) and then the outer layer is fatty tissue. In the bottom picture, you can see that a 70 year old triathlete has in contrast a huge proportion of muscle mass (almost similar to that of the 40 year old in the top picture) and minimal fatty tissue.

Why does it matter? 

The amount of lean muscle mass that you have contributes to your overall lean body mass. Lean body mass is very important. It’s not just about looking great or being stronger, sufficient amounts of lean body mass are actually critical for building a healthy life over the long-term.

  • Lean body mass is associated with your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR), the amount of calories you burn at rest. The greater amount of Lean Body Mass you have, the greater your BMR will be. This means that people with greater amounts of Lean Body Mass will have a greater energy expenditure while doing nothing, helping to avoid calorie imbalances, and ultimately, obesity.
  • If you become ill or are stressed, your body’s nutritional demands increase as your immune system gets to work. An essential part of your immune system working well is protein. All this protein can’t come from food alone, so your immune system also relies on your protein reserves or your lean body mass. So, in short if you have a better lean body mass your body will find it easier to fight illness, infection or stress.
  • Having a good lean body or muscle mass more specifically, helps protect against bones becoming weaker or thinner. Osteoporosis and frailty in later life put older people at great risk as they lead to falls and fractures. What is beneficial about optimising muscle mass is that you can increase bone strength and density.

In the medical field, loss of muscle mass is known as Sarcopenia. This is defined as the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and is a well-established factor associated with decreases in muscle strength and impaired mobility. The potential consequences of sarcopenia are frailty, physical disability, loss of independence and the depression that can accompany this; and the reduced ability to cope with major illnesses.

Subsequently, preventing the loss of or building lean muscle mass is a really crucial part of looking after your body.

What can I do to improve lean body mass?

The earlier you can start developing or optimising your lean muscle mass the better, because as you age, it gets harder to improve muscle mass. However, the good news is, it’s never too late to start!

Diet

Diet plays a huge part. It’s outside the scope of this blog to explore the dietary factors, but if you want to look into this further, this website is a great resource and also has a database of professionals.

Movement & exercise!

There’s no easy way to improve lean body or muscle mass, it needs investment. Although cardio exercise like running, walking or swimming are great for improving and maintaining the health of your heart, lungs and circulation, to improve lean muscle mass you have to include specific types of exercise or activity to your routine. The best thing to do is some form of resistance training, so using light weights to exercise your muscle and build up strength and lean muscle mass. You can also do things like cycling, Pilates or yoga. Everyday activities like gardening, housework, shopping and childcare can also be pretty strenuous and will help too.

If you’re a little older and are worried about hitting the gym or starting exercises on your own, maybe think about seeing one of our Rehab Therapists for some individual guidance and support to help you get stronger and feel confident with exercising. 

You can read more about Rehabilitation here



Warning over danger of ‘online advice’

Posted on 4th June 2020 by

Physiotherapists are calling on people to visit trusted sources online after a study highlighted alarming levels of misinformation in the most-watched back pain videos on YouTube.

With the lockdown limiting access to face to face help from suitably qualified professionals, turning to online advice has surged.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy enlisted a team of specialist musculoskeletal physiotherapists to study the 100 most highly viewed videos on YouTube when searching for ‘advice and treatment for back pain’.

 Some of the videos had millions of views but the physiotherapists found:

  • Almost half contained a myth (43%)
  • Six in 10 contained false or misleading information (60%)
  • Nearly a third had an unrealistic video demo (32%)
  • Four in 10 contained unhelpful language that was fear evoking or contradictory (42%)
  • Almost half did not state their qualifications for providing advice (45%)

Among the most egregious examples were videos that recommended applying garlic oil to the back, taking devil’s claw and avoiding ‘abnormal eating’.

Some claimed to have a ‘miracle cure’ for back pain – such as drinking lemon and salt – while others promised a ‘quick fix’.

Many pushed advice that would lead the viewer to believe their back was weak or easily damaged and movements such as bending or twisting should be avoided, myths that physio’s are trying to battle against.

The study certainly reflects what we see here at gophysio with unregulated health advice online. Even before lockdown, so many patients would come in after trying some very questionable methods of self treatment that they’d been recommend or seen online.

A snap poll of 100 physiotherapists found that nearly a third (32%) of their patients cited false or misleading information they got from the internet on a daily basis. 

Two thirds (66%) of physiotherapists said they had to treat patients whose condition had worsened because of this. 

Both during lockdown with our online virtual consultations and now we have re-opened for face to face appointments, here at goPhysio we have been seeing an increasing number of ‘isolation injuries‘. People have been doing unfamiliar exercise programmes, taking up new activities and doing lot’s of gardening, DIY and odd jobs around the house, which their body’s aren’t used to.

“So many people we see at goPhysio are really afraid after seeing some online advice and recommendations, with unhelpful beliefs and expectations of treatments that may help. They’re often really confused, having heard and read so much conflicting advice.”

Clinical Director of goPhysio, Paul

During this extremely difficult period, people are very wary of putting extra pressure on the healthcare system and are relying more on online advice. This is coupled with an increase in the familiarity of using digital channels and resources. But there is a mind-field of online advice out there and the public need to be aware that this information isn’t regulated.

With a click of your mouse you risk receiving biased, unhelpful and incomplete advice.

It’s not only articles or videos, some of the advice and comments on online forums, chat groups and social media that we see can be equally damaging and confusing. So many ‘unqualified’ people profess to having the answer

Just because someone’s had similar symptoms or has a familiar injury, doesn’t mean the advice and treatment that they had is correct for you! So many factors play a part in an injury and that’s why it’s so important to have a thorough assessment, accurate diagnosis and follow a treatment plan that’s devised for you, your injury and your lifestyle.


Take Time to Focus on your Breathing

Posted on 31st March 2020 by

Now, more than any other time, we should regularly spend a few moments each day and think about our breathing.

The current change in our life styles will have a significant impact on our breathing, whether that is due to lower levels of activity from the imposed restrictions, or an increase in stress and anxiety due to the unprecedented circumstances we find ourselves in.

Both of these scenarios will lead us to spending most of our time doing what we call Apical Breathing.  This is when the breathing is mainly confined to the upper chest. As a result of apical breathing, the accessory muscles in your shoulders are doing all the work without the pay-off of a deep breath. Since the inhalation is shallow, the body has to compensate by breathing more frequently. This creates a poorer exchange of oxygen and increase tension in our neck and shoulders. 

Image courtesy of Temple Health

Ideally we should spend regular periods of time doing what is known as Diaphragmatic Breathing.  This is when we use the diaphragm to lift and spread the ribs on inhalation and ease them back down on exhalation.  This allows the lungs to work more efficiently, utilising a larger proportion of the lungs resulting in more oxygen being transferred into the bloodstream and around the body.  It also reduces the work load of the muscles around our neck and shoulders.

Try these two approaches to improving your breathing technique, feel the benefits of increasing oxygen supply and reducing the tension in the muscles around your neck and shoulders.

Technique 1 ‘At Rest’

Lie on your back with your hips and knees bent up, feet flat on the floor. Place a folded towel or small pillow under your head. Place your hands across the lower half of your ribcage with the tips of your fingers slightly interlaced.  Breathe in and allow your lower ribs to expand widthways. Let your fingertips draw apart from one another slightly. Breathe out and allow your ribcage to sink inwards and downwards. Your fingertips may interlace slightly as you empty your lungs. Watch that you do not lift your breastbone as you breathe in. Instead imagine the back of your ribcage spreading wide into the floor underneath you.  Keep your neck and shoulders relaxed.

Once you have learned to do this exercise lying down you can then use this skill to improve your breathing when sat at your desk or when standing up.

Technique 2 ‘Being Active’

When we increase our activity levels we require more oxygen and therefore generally we employ more of our lung capacity to do this.

Current Government guidelines (as of 23rd March 2020) allow each individual to leave the house for exercise once a day. So a run, walk or cycle (within social distancing limits) are excellent ways of improving your breathing. If you are unable to do this then the following exercises can be done in your own home:

  • Star jumps
  • Step ups on the bottom step of the stairs
  • Repeated sit to stand from a chair
  • Skipping
  • Squat thrusts/burpees

The list is endless so see what you can come up with!


Strong, Steady & Straight – Benefit of Pilates for Osteoporosis

Posted on 1st October 2019 by

Osteoporosis, although a well known condition, comes with much worry and fear surrounding it about physical activity and exercise. A diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia (reduced bone density on a less severe scale than osteoporosis), can often conjure up thoughts of being fragile and fearful of doing too much or exercises that might be harmful.

So, it’s great to see some updated guidance around exercise and physical activity for osteoporosis. The guidance is structured around 3 important themes:

  1. STRONG – the types and amount of exercise and physical activity needed to promote bone strength.
  2. STEADY – the importance of including exercise and physical activity to reduce falls and resulting fractures.
  3. STRAIGHT – a focus on ‘spine care’, keeping the back straight. A positive approach to bending, moving and lifting safely to reduce the risk of vertebral fracture, improve posture and relieve pain after vertebral fracture.

The key principles of the guidance include some important messages:

  • Physical activity and exercise has an important role in the management of osteoporosis – promoting bone strength, reducing falls risk and managing symptoms.
  • People with osteoporosis should be encouraged to do more rather than less. This should be supported with a positive and encouraging approach – ‘how to’ rather than ‘don’t do’.
  • Physical activity and exercise is not associated with significant harm – though some caution is advised, the benefits of physical activity and exercise outweigh the risks. Seek specialist support and advice to help you exercise in the most beneficial way.
Physical activity and exercise for osteoporosis

This makes Pilates a fantastic option as the main aims of Pilates are: 

  • Strengthen your muscles
  • Improve your balance
  • Improve you posture.  

Notice any similarities?!

Not only that, Pilates doesn’t involve any sudden impact so further reduces the risks of fractures associated to osteoporosis.

The added benefit of Pilates at goPhysio is that our classes are taken by a rehab professional with experience of treating patients with osteoporosis amongst other common conditions.

You can find out more about our Pilates classes here.

Read More

Love Your Bones – World Osteoporosis Day

More about Osteoporosis



World Physiotherapy Day 2019

Posted on 8th September 2019 by

Every year, on the 8th September, World Physiotherapy Day takes place – a day to recognise the work that physiotherapists do and the difference that our profession can make to peoples lives.

goPhysio Chronic pain

The campaign for World Physiotherapy Day 2019 is focussed around the theme of chronic pain and the role that physiotherapy and physical activity can have in helping people manage chronic pain.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages about the benefits of using exercise to manage chronic pain to:

  • maintain flexibility and movement
  • improve cardiovascular health
  • build and keep muscle tone
  • improve mood and general wellbeing
  • help control pain
  • increase confidence to take part in activities
  • take back control of your life and reduce your fear.

These messages are important not just to encourage health and activity in populations. They can help demonstrate how Physio’s keep people moving through interventions which maximise strength and mobility. Through advice and exercise programmes, physio’s support people of all ages to achieve activity goals.

What is chronic pain?

Chronic or persistent pain is pain that carries on for longer than 12 weeks despite medication or treatment. Most people get back to normal after pain following an injury or operation. But sometimes the pain carries on for longer or comes on without any history of an injury or operation. It can be an extremely frustrating, confusing and challenging time.

Here’s a fantastic video that explains it further.

As Physio’s, we can help people with such pain to get moving without fear, where the brain isn’t protecting by pain. There really is so much power in having the confidence and support to get moving.

Chronic pain how physio can help
goPhysio Chronic pain
goPhysio Chronic pain

If you have pain and want help and support, please give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to see how we can help you.


Best Care for Musculoskeletal Pain

Posted on 28th August 2019 by

What does best practice care for musculoskeletal pain look like? A recent review was published by The British Medical Journal, that came up with 11 consistent recommendations to help form ‘best practice’ in the care of musculoskeletal pain.

In today’s blog, we explore these recommendations, how we implement them at goPhysio and what it means to you guys, the people with the pain or injury.

11 Best Practice Recommendations for care in musculoskeletal care.

#1 Care should be patient centred This goes without saying, but you’re the one and only person that matters to us. We take time to get to know you, learn how your injury is impacting you, and work with you to understand your lifestyle, so we know what we are aiming for. Everyone and everyone’s circumstances are SO different and individual, so it’s crucial our approach to each and every person we see is individualised too.

#2 Screen for serious conditions We take this incredibly seriously and although it may go un-noticed by you, we make sure that there is nothing serious going on. If we are in any way concerned, we’ll make sure we point you in the right direction and will provide any letters, phone calls or support that you need.

#3 Assess psychological factors The body and the mind are inextricably linked. The power of the mind is incredible. You need to feel reassured, informed and have an appropriate understanding of your injury. Any doubts, fears, worries or misconceptions will really impact on your recovery. We make sure we consider any psychological factors that may be impacting you and address them appropriately.

#4 Only refer for imaging if specifically indicated It’s a commonly held myth, that a scan or an X-Ray is needed in order to diagnose an injury. In fact, referrals for imaging (X-Rays or scans) are only needed in very specific cases. Why? Because all too often, symptoms do not relate to imaging results. So, an image may not show any damage or injury, but you may be getting symptoms. Equally, you may have damage on imaging, but be symptom free and seeing the damage on imagery can cause issues in itself! If we think that there is indication for a scan or X-Ray we will make sure we assist you with this. We can even refer directly to low cost, quick, private scanning – so you don’t have to get referred by a Dr, saving you even more time.

#5 Physical examination This is our bread and butter. Using all our senses – looking, feeling, testing, questioning and putting it all together with our evaluation skills in order to explain to you exactly what’s going on.

#6 Evaluate progress Together, we will set your goals, what you want to achieve through coming to see us. That’s the most important bit. However, we will also take measurements and document certain testing, so that we can measure your progress and ensure we’re on the right track.

#7 Education We want to make sure that you fully understand what’s going on in as much detail as you need. Some people only want the basics, some want an in depth explanation. But if you can understand what’s going on and what you can do to help yourself with your recovery, you’re much more likely to succeed in achieving your goal. This may include modifying your activity or lifestyle slightly, changing a routine, adapting a training programme or work activity.

#8 Address physical activity / exercise As a team go health professionals, it’s important that we support everyone in living a healthy and active life. As part of this, we can provide the necessary support and advice you may need to start or increase your physical activity. Some people find having an injury a bit of a wake up call to make some changes and often, getting more active is one.

#9 Apply ‘manual therapy’ as an adjunct We use a huge range of treatments to help you with your recovery. Using our hands (manual therapy) is just one tool, and can be very beneficial in many ways for lot’s of different injuries and to help ease pain. It is very important though that it is used as an adjunct to more active approaches, such as exercise and education/advice. Manual therapy alone is unlikely to be a solution to your recovery, as it’s effects are often short lived – it’s the strengthening, stretching, confidence and education that makes the most impact on recovery.

#10 Discuss non-surgical approaches (unless surgery indicated) Unfortunately, people still remain entrenched in the ‘medical model’ of belief, thinking that medicine and/or surgery are the only answer. They often want quick fixes and magic cures! Much of the evidence is now very clear on when surgery is indicated and it’s not as often as you may think! Physiotherapy and physical treatments are often much more effective than surgery when given the chance in many conditions. Obviously, there are cases when surgery is absolutely the right decision. In these cases, our Clinicians will help with referrals and work very closely with many local Consultants to ensure you receive the most appropriate care. We can also closely liaise with your GP to facilitate this.

#11 Facilitate continuation or return to work Staying at work or returning to work ASAP when you’ve had an injury is crucially important for your recovery. We can help advise on modifying your activities so this is possible. It may seem a bit daunting, especially if you’ve had to take time off work because of your injury. But remaining in work helps in so many ways.

If you’ve got an injury and want the best possible care, then do give us a call on 023 8025 3317 and see if we can help you.

Helping local people live a healthy, active, positive life, pain and injury free.

goPhysio


Physiotherapy For Cycling Injuries

Posted on 1st June 2019 by

Bike week 2019
The 8th – 16th June 2019 sees in Bike Week, which aims to inspire more people to take to 2 wheels.

Cycling is a wonderful way to exercise, whatever your level or age. It’s great for cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, flexibility and has a host of health benefits.

It’s a safe form of exercise and is often a great way to start fit if you need to maintain your fitness with a lower impact activity. It’s also a fab way to incorporate exercise into a mode of travel!

However, like many forms of exercise, cycling can become a source of injuries. Cycling injuries tend to fall into 2 camps, either a traumatic injury or an overuse injury.

Traumatic Injuries

These are caused by some sort of trauma. This is normally a fall or collision and can be very minor to severe. Traumatic injuries are often accidents that can’t be avoided, but you can take precautions. These include:

  • Wearing appropriate protective clothing such as a helmet
  • Being up to date with bike maintenance to make sure you bike is in top working order
  • Knowing and reading the weather conditions and environment to make sure they fit with your plans
  • Understanding your personal limitations and being realistic with your ability. Many accidents occur when people are pushing themselves unrealistically.

Common traumatic cycling injuries include:

  • Fractures – often the clavicle (collar bone) or scaphoid (wrist) as you put your arm out to protect you as you fall.
  • Bruising – to the muscle and/or bone. This is as a result of falling directly onto the area, often a prominent bony area such as the outside of the hip.

Overuse Injuries

As the name implies, are caused when a part of the body is being ‘overused’ and can’t cope with the physical demands being placed upon it. Cycling is a very repetitive activity, an average cyclist might perform well over 5,000 revolutions an hour. The human body has a threshold of what it will tolerate and sometimes it just can’t cope with prolonged repetitive demands being placed on it. This is when an overuse injury rears it’s head.

The problem with overuse injuries is that they often start gradually as a tiny niggle that you ignore. Before you know it that niggle is a regular occurrence but you think it will just go away just as it appeared. Then it eventually becomes really annoying and can actually becomes so severe it stops you doing the things you love and that may have caused it in the first place, which is even more of a pain!

You can take steps to avoid or minimise the impact of cycling overuse injuries. These include:

  • Make sure your bike is set up correctly. This is crucial given the repetitive nature of cycling. Very small adjustments such as saddle and handlebar height can make a huge difference.
  • Increase your cycling gradually. Whether its speed, distance or hills – don’t do too much all at once. You need to give your body time to adapt and adjust to the demands being placed upon it.
  • Listen to your body. If you feel a little niggle, hold back a bit until it eases off to give your body chance to recover.
  • Seek advice at the right time. If a niggle is becoming more than that, it’s better to come and see us sooner rather than later. Overuse injuries that are ignored can often become long term problems and then they’re much harder to resolve and take longer to recover.

Common cycling overuse injuries include:

  • Back pain – which is often related to your posture on the bike and easily resolved by changing your bike set up.
  • Neck pain – again, this is often posture related and being more aware of your posture and position on the bike can be really helpful.
  • Knee pain – including tendonopathies, patellofemoral pain (front of knee) or ITB problems (side of knee).
  • Foot or ankle problems – such as achilles tendonopathy or forefoot pain from the pressure of peddling.

As Physio’s we’re highly skilled at identifying and resolving all the injury issues that may arise from cycling. Many of our team are keen cyclists themselves, so can truly identify with what you’re experiencing. If you are suffering with an injury as a result of cycling, give us a call to see how we can help you and get you back on your bike! #BikeWeekUK


Read more about Physiotherapy for Cycling Injuries on the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists website.


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The Elephant In The Room – MSK Conditions

Posted on 17th October 2018 by

Musculoskeletal conditions: the elephant in the room?MSK Conditions

Conditions of the bones, joints and muscles are a big problem in the UK; with over 17 million people living with a musculoskeletal condition, more people suffer with disability from musculoskeletal conditions than anything else.

Good health of bones, joints and muscles underpins living life well. Musculoskeletal conditions affect nearly everyone at some point in their life. They can cause pain, fatigue, restricted mobility and activities of daily living. They impact people’s lives, their work and even people’s other health conditions. Conditions of the bones, joints and muscles represent a significant cost to the individual, the economy and health and social care.

Acknowledging the problem

Everyone knows conditions like arthritis and back pain are common. But they are often misunderstood and ignored, like the figurative elephant in the room. The solution begins in acknowledging the problem. That’s why we need to shift our mindset and start planning and acting nationally, locally and individually for healthy bones, joints and muscles throughout life.

Large rewards

If we’re brave enough to tackle this big and growing problem, to champion lifelong good musculoskeletal health, there are large rewards! We see it day in day out here at goPhysio – poor MSK health has a huge impact on quality of life. If you invest in your MSK health, like in other areas of your health and wellbeing, you can get more out of life!

Why are MSK conditions the elephant in the room?

From our years of experience, there are many factors!

  • Firstly, MSK conditions often occur gradually or creep up on you. It starts as a niggle or minor ache or pain, that you accept as part of life. You manage it yourself or make small adjustments in your life to compensate. Over time, your pain, stiffness and limited mobility gets worse, but the impact on your life has been so gradual, you don’t really notice until the effects are huge. Suddenly you’re not walking so far, aren’t exercising, avoiding certain activities and you take a look and are shocked what affect it’s had on you.
  • MSK conditions aren’t immediately life threatening. Let’s face it, no matter how painful the condition is, there is nothing immediately at stake aside from quality of life. Subsequently, they aren’t always a high priority. However, this view is very short sighted – because over time, the impact of long standing MSK conditions can have a huge impact. Being less active and living with a painful MSK condition can cause many other issues as there will be knock on effects with mental health, cardiovascular health, maintaining a healthy weight and all the complexities that come with health.
  • Culturally, we’ve been lead to believe the ‘wait and see’ approach is OK! How many times have you heard ‘rest’, ‘take painkillers’ ‘it’ll get better in time’? Funding cuts in the NHS has bread this culture! The truth is, if people had the support, education and correct personalised, professional advice from the early onset of an MSK condition, the issues could be reduced massively.
  • Preventing MSK conditions and the solutions aren’t easy! Everyone now wants the easy option, the quick fix! But preventing and addressing MSK conditions need investment in time and effort. If you could take a magic pill that would solve it – great. But tackling these conditions takes time, there often isn’t a miracle miracle cure. e.g. If you have back pain, there is overwhelming evidence that exercise is the best management. But what do most G.P.s do if you go and see them with back pain? They’ll often advise painkillers and rest as the first step. Take osteoarthritis of the knee. Again, exercise is a highly effective treatment for this condition. But shockingly, many people would rather have a risky operation with no guarantee of a positive outcome than commit time and effort to doing regular, prescribed, specific exercises that would help them.

This week is officially Bone and Joint Week. Hopefully, getting the message out there will help filter out awareness of these conditions, the impact they have on so many people.

World Spine Day

Physio for MSK Conditions

physio for MSK conditions hampshire

#BoneJointWeek


World Physical Therapy Day 2018

Posted on 8th September 2018 by

World Physical Therapy Day takes place every year on 8th September. The day is an opportunity for Physiotherapists (physical therapists) from all over the world to raise awareness about the crucial contribution the profession makes to keeping people well, mobile and independent.

Get Active. Stay Active. Talk to one of our Physiotherapists today.

The campaign message of World Physical Therapy Day 2018 is “Physical therapy and mental health”, demonstrating the role that physical therapy and physical activity has in mental health.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages:

  • Exercise as an evidence-based treatment for depression.
  • The role of physical therapists working with patients who may have mental health issues.
  • The benefits of physical activity in protecting against the emergence of depression.
  • How better outcomes are experienced when exercise is delivered by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist.
  • How people with mental health issues are more at risk of having poor physical health.

Here are some great infographics that summarise how mental health can be improved with exercise and the crucial role physiotherapists can have in supporting this.

World Physio Day 2018

World Physio Day mental health

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Hospital Open Day: Inspire Young Minds

Posted on 4th September 2018 by

SUHT Open Day 2018

I absolutely love taking my children to the Southampton General Hospital Open Day. I still remember being taken there by my Mum when I was very young and it was my experiences at the open days that sowed the seed of curiosity about working in a health care profession. My dreams were realised as I became a physiotherapist and even though my role now at goPhysio isn’t directly clinically based, my times spent working in many hospitals and different healthcare settings have left a significant imprint in my memory.

I am still moved by the differences we make to people’s every day lives through physiotherapy and am proud to be part of the profession.

The hands on activities and behind the scenes glimpses at the open day can really inspire young minds. The human body is truly fascinating and the people who do so much when it isn’t working right, for whatever reason, are amazing. Whether or not you have children to entertain, I’d thoroughly recommend adding this event to your diary.

The 2018 Hospital Open Day will be taking place on Saturday, 8 September 2018 from 10.30am to 3.30pm at Southampton General Hospital with hundreds of activities and stalls on offer throughout the day.

The Open Day is a fantastic day for all the family to find out more about the hospital and UHS, the services they provide, the amazing opportunities available and ground-breaking work taking place.

The theme this year will be Health Hero Academy through the years and give visitors the chance to not only pick up new skills and have fun, but find out more about the history of University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, as well as their plans for the future.

Post by Fiona, goPhysio’s Non-Clinical Director

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