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How to Foam Roll – The Art of Self-Myofascial Release

Posted on 19th April 2020 by

You may be feeling the effects of either doing too much exercise during lockdown, from tackling daily workouts at home without face to face guidance or tackling exercises your body isn’t used to. Or, it may be the opposite, and the lack of activity from not getting out and about so much is taking its toll. Maybe you’re just missing your regular massage!

The good news is, a foam roller could be your new best friend!

Here’s a quick, no nonsense guide to help ease any tight, achey areas and improve your warm-up, performance and prevent injury with some simple foam rolling! It’s all about the fascia!

What is fascia?

Firstly, fascia is a dense connective tissue that surrounds every muscle, joint and organ in the body.

There are 3 types of fascia; superficial, deep and visceral.

  • Superficial fascia lies just beneath the skin.
  • Deep fascia penetrates and surrounds muscle tissue.
  • Visceral fascia helps keep vital organs in place.

Everything in the body is connected through fascia, but some areas are more connected than others, forming thickened sheaths and bands of fascia. These are bundled together, inseparable from the muscle tissue (myo) and it’s accompanying web of connective tissue (fascia), forming a 3D myo-fascial web throughout the body. Think of a 3D spider’s web in the shape of your body & you’re getting close!

When working optimally, this myo-fascial web helps provide support, stability, movement dynamics, force transmission and optimises sporting performance.

Why should I foam roll?

Trigger Point Grid Foam Roller Foam rolling
We like the Grid Rollers from Trigger Point Therapy
  • For warm-up pre running, as it’s far more effective that static stretching (5)
  • To increase nutrient-rich blood flow to muscles that need it.
  • To improve the mobility and flexibility of muscles and joints (4,6,7).
  • To increase athletic performance (8,9).
  • To recover from exercise faster (1,2,3).
  • To reduce inflammation and remove toxins/chemical waste products.
  • Longer term, to break down adhesions in muscle and connective tissue.
  • You can also successfully self-treat minor injuries such as muscle strains and trigger points.

When should I foam roll? 

  •  MB1 MB5 Trigger Point Roller Ball
    A great alternative to a foam roller is the MB1 or MB5 ball

    Before exercise: when paired with a dynamic warm up to increase blood flow to areas that may be lacking it.

  • After exercise: used within a cool-down procedure to flush out blood that has pooled in working muscles and to allow fresh nutrients and oxygen in to kick start the recovery process.

If you’re used to getting ‘hands on’ treatment but the lockdown means this is no longer possible, this can be a great alternative.

Rolling for only a few minutes can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your training session. So, if you’re stuck for time, pre-exercise rolling would provide most benefit.

How to foam roll

Remember this easy guide and apply it to each muscle group that you’re working on.

  • 4 linear rolls (to search the muscle for areas of tightness, we call these ‘hot spots’).
  • 30 second holds on each hot spot.
  • 4 joint movements (to move the muscle underneath the roller).
  1. Underside of the foot (plantar fascia)

TrP Foot roller Foam rolling

  • Place the roller under the sole of the foot.
  • Apply pressure and roll slowly towards the heel and back to the sole of the foot, 4 times.
  • Hold pressure on any hot spots you may find.
  • Once this hot spot starts to reduce, maintain pressure and add in movement of the toes by flexing and extending them all 4 times.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Calves (gastrocnemius and soleus)TrP Calf Roller
  • Zone A = achilles to mid-calf.
  • Zone B = mid-calf to just below the knee.
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by sitting on the floor with the roller on your Achilles tendon.
  • Place your hands behind you and the other leg on top to add pressure.
  • Roll up and down searching for hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Thighs (quadriceps)
  • Zone A = front of the hip to mid-thigh.
  • Zone B = mid-thigh to just above the knee. TrP Quads
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by lying on your front with the roller at the front of your hip just below the bone.
  • Support yourself with your elbows out in front and the other leg bent up to the side.
  • Roll up and down in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Now, once on a hot spot, bend and straighten the knee 4 times.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Buttock (gluteals and piriformis)
  • Begin by sitting on the roller with your hands behind you for support.
  • Shift your weight onto one side as you bring that leg up and cross it over the other.
  • Aim to have the roller ‘in your back pocket’.TrP Glutes Foam Rolling
  • Roll along the length of your glute in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Upper back (paraspinals, rhomboids, trapezius)
  • Lay on your back with the roller just below the shoulder blades.
  • Place your arms behind your head or cross them in front of your chest.TrP Upper Back Foam Rolling
  • Lift your hips off the floor and use your legs to roll up and down the spine.
  • Carefully extend your back over the roller.
  • Add in side bends to target various muscle groups.
  • Again, if any hot spots are identified, hold this pressure for 30 seconds before moving on.
  1. Chest (pectoralis major/minor)
  • Lay on your front and place the roller (or trigger point ball) just inside the shoulder joint, on the pectoralis tendon. Pec TrP
  • With the arm above the head roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in arm movements to manipulate the soft tissue underneath the roller. 4 straight-arm scoops should do it.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.
  1. Latissimus Dorsi
  • Lay on your side with one arm above your head for support.
  • Place the roller at a 45° angle just underneath your armpit.Lat Dorsi TrP
  • Shift your weight to roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in straight arm movements to release the tissues further, 4 movements followed by 4 rolls.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.

Here’s a handy videos you can watch to help demonstrate some foam rolling techniques.

Check out our YouTube Channel for more videos.

We also have a handy little download for you here: goPhysio Foam Rolling Super Six

If you haven’t got a foam roller, we recommend the TrP Rollers and balls. We can deliver same day to anywhere in the SO53 postcode during this lockdown period, so take a look here for more details.


References

  1. Pearcey GP, Bradbury-Squires DJ, Kawamoto J, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG, Button DC. Foam rolling for delayed-onset muscle soreness and recovery of dynamic performance measures. J Athl Train. 2015;50:5–13.
  2. Macdonald et al. (2014) Macdonald GZ, Button DC, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG. Foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense bout of physical activity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2014;46(1):131–142.
  3. Rey E, Padron-Cabo A, Costa PB, Barcala-Furelos R. The effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool in professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;
  4. Bushell JE, Dawson SM, Webster MM. Clinical relevance of foam rolling on hip extension angle in a functional lunge position. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29:2397–403.
  5. Su H, Chang NJ, Wu WL, Guo LY, Chu IH. Acute effects of foam rolling, static stretching, and dynamic stretching during warm-ups on muscular flexibility and strength in young adults. J Sport Rehabil. 2016; 1-24.
  6. Kelly S., Beardsley C. (2016) Specific and cross-over effects of foam rolling on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy 11(4), 544-551.
  7. Macdonald GZ, Penney M, Mullaley ME, Cuconato AL, Drake CD, Behm DG, Button DC. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force. J Strength Cond Res. 2013;27:812–821.
  8. Peacock CA, Krein DD, Silver TA, Sanders GJ, von Carlowitz KPA. An acute bout of self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling improves performance testing. Int J Exerc Sci. 2014;7:202-211
  9. Monteiro et al. Acute effects of different self-massage volumes on the FMS overhead deep squat performance. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017; 12(1): 94-104.
  10. Monteiro ER Correa Neto VG. Effect of different foam rolling volumes on knee extension fatigue. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2016;11(7):1076‐1081.

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Eastleigh 10K Race Pack Offers!

Posted on 6th March 2020 by

For the well deserved participants in the Eastleigh 10K, you should have received our exclusive offers in your race pack.

Until 30th April, you can take advantage of any of these offers:

  • Free 1-2-1 Pilates worth £45. Pilates is a fantastic addition to your running training. It helps develop strength, balance and movement control so that you can run more efficiently, preventing injuries. We run a timetable of over 20 specialist Pilates classes a week, including evenings and weekends. We have a range of different payment options, including a guaranteed weekly class membership or fully flexible PAYG option. Why not come along for a free 1-2-1 with one of our Clinical Instructors to find out if Pilates could help you.
  • 20% Off Strength Training Program. Have you got a longstanding, stubborn injury that just isn’t improving? An injury that’s stopping you from running or keeps coming back? Many common running injuries like achilles, knee and hip pain are caused by a lack of strength, stability and control. So come in and banish those along term niggling issues with our specific 6 week strength training for runners program in our Strong Room with one of our Sports and Rehabilitation Therapists.
  • Free computerised foot analysis. Recurrent injuries or daily aches and pains can often be caused by your foot position. Come along and find out if your feet are causing any issues for you. Read more.
  • 15% Off Sports Massage. Helping ease post run soreness, and daily stresses, aches and pains, a sports massage is a great way to invest in your wellbeing. You can claim 15% off as many times as you like before 30th April! Read more.

To book any of these special race pack offers, just give our team a call on 023 8025 3317 and quote EASTLEIGH10K.

T&C’s

  • All offers expire 30th April 2020
  • Not to be used in conjunction with any other offers
  • Offer code must be quoted at time of booking


Why it’s great to run!

Posted on 5th December 2019 by

We are delighted to be partnering up with the Hendy Eastleigh 10k again for 2020, as we become theEastleigh 10k goPhysio official Health Partner of the race for the third year.

One of the largest 10k road races in the country, the Hendy Eastleigh 10k is a fantastic event.

With just over 3 months to go until the Hendy Eastleigh 10k it is never to late to get your running shoes on and get going!

Still need convincing? Here’s a few reasons from our team why running is such a great form of exercise.

Why it’s great to run!

Running is one of the best forms of aerobic exercise for physical conditioning of the heart and lungs. Studies have shown that running has huge health benefits and it can help you experience more energy, patience, humour and creativity. It can even make you happier! So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running.

Running improves your health Running is a fantastic way to increase your overall health. Research shows that running can raise your levels of good cholesterol, increase lung function, boost your immune system & lower your risk of cardiovascular diseases. running can even fortify your immune system by accelerating the circulation of protective cells.

Running is great for your heart It’s the king of cardio. Running, even 30 minutes or so a few days a week, can help prevent or reduce high blood pressure. According to a landmark study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, running is associated with a drastically reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Running makes you happier The rush of chemicals (endorphins) your body experiences after a run can give you a ‘runners high’. Running can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. A recent study even found that just 30 minutes of running a week, for three weeks, can boost sleep quality, mood and concentration during the day.

It’s easy and convenient Whatever your schedule, you can always squeeze in a run. Just put on your trainer’s and off you go! You can even run whilst your kids cycle or with a baby in a pushchair, take your dog or run your commute!

It’s a cheap way to exercise No gym membership, joining fees or sneaky add-ons. Just the occasional pair of trainers every 500 miles or so, means running is a cost effective way to exercise regularly.

Running seriously torches calories Running is a great calorie burn. It’s one of the best forms of exercise for losing or maintaining consistent weight. The bonus is that the calorie burn continues after you stop running and regular running boosts this “after-burn”, amplifying the effects even more.

It’s a killer leg workout Your body’s biggest muscles are all in your legs and running benefits them all, it’s a great workout to strengthen these important muscles.

You can do it right now Running is such a natural motion, you don’t need to invest in special In the early stage, depending on your targets, you don’t need lessons like many other sports, as running is such a natural motion, just pop on your trainer’s and away you go.

Running strengthens your joints and bones It’s long been known that running helps increases bone mass, and even helps stem age-related bone loss or osteoporosis. It’s also great news for your knees, as a recent study found runners were half as likely to suffer with knee arthritis compared with walkers.

Running can add years to your life It’s recommended that we do at least 30 minutes of exercise, 5 times a week. Making sure you meet these recommendations will help you live a long and healthy life!

Running works your core A surprise to some, but running actually works your core too. The rotation in your spine as you run, challenges your core muscles, helping strengthen your spine. Running on uneven surfaces provides an extra challenge.

Running helps mental health We all live in a busy, stressful time. Running provides the opportunity to take some time purely for yourself, away from your phone, emails, colleagues and kids. You can get primitive with running, giving your brain space to recharge. It can help you to unwind and relax. It’s difficult to come back after a run stressed!

Running improves your sleep Feeling tired from exercise improves your ability to fall and stay asleep. Improving the quality of your sleep is now thought to be a fundamental part of your health and wellbeing. It is even thought that running can help cure insomnia!

Running boosts your confidence Running can boost your confidence and self-esteem. By setting and achieving goals, you can help give yourself a greater sense of empowerment that can leave you much happier and improve your overall feeling of wellbeing and mental health.

It’s a world of discovery Explore new parks, hidden tracks, forests, beaches, river paths, the list goes on. You can run anywhere, any time and enjoy the change of seasons and all the elements as you do.

Running boosts your memory Running can stimulate brain growth as it helps stimulate an increase in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which encourages neural growth.

Running is a great way to socialise Runners, love nothing more than talking to runners about running. There are so many social aspects to running, whether it’s joining a running club, taking part in a Parkrun or training for an event, there’s a lot of support and camaraderie found amongst runners.

There you have it! Many ways in which running can help you become healthier and happier. Every time you run, you’ll improve your resting heart rate, your body will release endorphins, your legs will get stronger and you’ll burn a whole lot of calories. In the end you’ll be happier, fitter and stronger! Remember the key to better health is right under your toes……

So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running. You’ll thank yourself for it!

Enter the Hendy Eastleigh 10k here.


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Eastleigh 10k 2019

Posted on 26th March 2019 by

What a glorious day we had for the Eastleigh 10k this year (a stark contrast to the snow of 2018!).

The event always has such a positive, friendly buzz around it. It’s so great chatting to runners before and after the event, hearing stories of P.B.s, overcoming injuries or personal challenges, having the comrardery of running with groups and clubs and friendships formed through running!

We massaged 172 well deserved runners and are grateful to not only our brilliant team who joined us early on a Sunday morning but also our fantastic volunteers from The Universities of Southampton, Solent and Bournemouth and Peter Symonds College to lend us a hand.

We hope you’re recovering well. Don’t forget, if you took part in the run you can take advantage of a host of race pack offers at goPhysio until 30th April. All the details of your discounted offers can be found here.

#Eastleigh10k


Eastleigh 10k Selfie Competition

Posted on 13th March 2019 by

Share a ‘Selfie’ of yourself at the Hendy Eastleigh 10k on Sunday 24th March 2019 alongside the goPhysio logo with the #GOPHYSIO and you could be in with a chance to win a fab prize, that includes a 1 hour sports massage, a place on one of our foam roller workshops and a place in our Strength & Conditioning for Runners Workshops!

Eastleigh 10k Selfie Competition Image

All you need to do is:

  1. Take a ‘Selfie’ alongside the goPhysio logo anywhere at the event – this could include whilst you’re having a massage, talking to one of our team or alongside our logo anywhere you might find it!
  2. Post your selfie on either Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and make sure you use the hashtag #GOPHYSIO by the end of race day (midnight 24.03.19)
  3. 2 winners from across all 3 social media channels will be picked at random to win this fab prize package, which includes a 1 hour sports massage, a place on one of our foam roller workshops and a place in one of our strength & conditioning for runners workshops.
  4. Winners will be notified via social media on Monday 25th March 2019.

T&Cs

  • All selfies much be posted on social media by midnight on 24.03.19
  • All selfies must include the hashtag #GOPHYSIO within the accompanying text
  • All selfies must clearly show the goPhysio logo
  • All prizes are subject to availability
  • The 3 social media channels that are included in this competition are Twitter, Facebook and Instagram
  • Prizes can not be exchanged for cash
  • We reserve the right to exclude any person from participating in the competition on reasonable grounds
  • We reserve the right to end the competition or to amend these terms and conditions at any time without prior notice

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Runners – How To Avoid Injuries

Posted on 9th February 2019 by

Running injury meme

No one wants an injury, particularly runners. Not being able to run because of an injury is highly frustrating.

The good news is, so many running injuries can be avoided very easily with the right understanding, knowledge, preparation and planning. 

Here, we’d like to share with you some top ways of helping to prevent an injury if you’re a runner.

Warm Up Effectively

A solid warm up should consist of foam rolling (which can improve performance), mobility work to maximise joint health and longevity, dynamic stretching and muscle activation to fire up the key players in running (calves, quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes). Running backwards is a great way of activating your glutes which play a huge role in stabilising the hips and promoting good form when running forwards. Read more about warming up here.

Route Knowledge

Know your run. If you’re heading out on a new route, make sure you know the terrain, any obstacles, gradients or side-planes and are equipped for the specific weather and conditions that you’re running in.

Train Smart

Increase mileage safely and run with proper form. There are so many resources now online to help guide and direct your training in a ‘smart’ way. This is crucial to preventing injuries if you’re serious about progressing your running. Joining a running club or group is a great way to get guidance and support too.

Increasing Mileage

Beginners should avoid increasing their mileage every week. Instead try every 3-4 weeks. Add an extra day into your running week to increase your weekly mileage. Advanced runners should increase their mileage by 5-10% of their current mileage and remain there until they’re comfortable. This may take several weeks. Injury can occur easily if you ramp up your speed or mileage too quickly. Remember, slow and steady wins the race!

Form

If you’ve been injury free for a long time and you aren’t looking to shave seconds off of your PB, we wouldn’t advise you to alter your running form. Contrary to popular belief, there isn’t a ‘perfect’ running technique. Technique only really needs addressing if it’s causing you problems, if not, then don’t try and change it! 

However, if you have an injury and a gait analysis suggests you would benefit from altering your form, it would make sense to address this issue. You might try to reduce your stride length so that you plant the foot with a vertical shin, this will reduce the forces transmitted through your legs and limit any deceleration from planting your foot too far forward. Also, try to maintain space between the knees. Allowing the thigh to internally rotate or drop in when you run can lead to overuse injuries occurring at the hip, knee and foot.

If you need expert advice and guidance on this, consider something like our running rehab service.

Footwear Advice

Ensure that you wear a comfortable shoe that fits well. Rubbing and blisters can put an end to anybody’s run. Don’t be tempted to buy the shoes that look the nicest, fashion won’t help keep you injury free. If you have low arches, find a shoe that supports you in the areas that you need it. Seek professional advice from a reputable running shop where you can try the shoes and they have video gait analysis. Read more about the importance of getting your footwear right here.

Strength Work Between Runs

A stronger kinetic chain will decrease ground reaction forces (GRF), making running more comfortable and more efficient. Working on your core stability will promote the transfer of forces from your upper and lower limbs, meaning less work for your legs. Strong glutes will stabilise your hips and prevent poor biomechanical loading from occurring. Pilates is a great way to help this or specific strength and conditioning exercises.

Balance & Proprioception

Proprioception is your body’s awareness of where it is in space – so your joints and brain and muscles all talking to each other! Along with balance, it’s a crucial component to keeping you injury free. It enables your body to cope and respond to uneven terrain, pot holes and curbs and varied weather conditions. Both are very trainable with the right exercises.

If you’ve ever sprained an ankle and haven’t undergone a rehabilitation programme, the chances of you re-spraining that same ankle are very high. After an injury your ankle suffers from a loss of proprioceptive ability and strength, which needs to be rebuilt with balance, proprioception and strength work. If you’re lucky enough to have never sprained an ankle but enjoy running both on and off road, lower limb stability with balance and proprioception work should be a part of your regular gym routine.

Catching Minor Injuries In The Early Stages (Recognition & Treatment)

Being able to recognise the early stages of injury will allow you to nip them in the bud before they become an issue. Examples include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, shin splints, runners knee or patella tendinopathy, ITB syndrome and muscle strains. As soon as any signs or symptoms are noticed, your best option is to consult an injury specialist. We all know what muscle soreness (DOMS) feels like. If it’s a different pain, don’t run through it or just think you can rest, it will disappear and then you can get straight back to your 10 miles! 

We provide you with easy access to help and support if you’ve developed a running injury. The majority of running injuries are what we term ‘overuse injuries‘ and need a highly trained and experienced professional to really help you get to the root cause and address it effectively. 

Cool Down Correctly

Exercise causes our muscles to break down on a microscopic level, which can lead to muscle shortening if left untreated. Stretching after running will help maintain the resting length of your muscles and prevent any imbalances from occurring. Sports massage is a great way of helping recover too. A sports massage will help flush out any lactic acid and waste products left sitting in your muscles following exercise, as well as promote the flow of nutrient-rich blood to those areas to facilitate healing and decrease recovery times.

Sleep

Sleep is very important when talking about injury prevention in runners. When you sleep, hormones are released that promote recovery. When you don’t get enough sleep, stress hormones and inflammatory markers remain elevated which adversely affects your ability to recover. These hormones can also alter appetite regulation, potentially leading to weight gain. To remain injury-free, you need to sleep and recover to the best of your ability. Establish good habits by going to and getting out of bed at the same time each day, and try to get at least 6-7 hours of sleep each night as a minimum, 8 hours is great. Read how we think sleep is the magic elixir for runners on a previous blog here

Do these eBibs from ilovetorun resonate with anyone? Certainly ‘run true’ for a lot of injured runners we see at the clinic!


Strength & Conditioning For Runners

Posted on 18th December 2018 by

Alongside running (obviously) it’s great for runners to have a good mix of activities as part of their training.

Why? Well, not only does it help prevent injury by mixing up the demands placed upon your body from repetitive activity, it also gives the opportunity to build strength, flexibility and other aspects of fitness that will actually help your running. Exercises like Pilates can be great for helping optimise your movement control but equally important is brining in some specific strength and conditioning work. 

Here we’d like to share with you Sports & Rehab Therapist Francesca’s top picks for S&C exercises that are great for runners. All of these can be done with or without weight and progressed as and when appropriate. Strength training should be completed at least once a week along side your running.

Dumb bell romain deadlift S&C runners
Dumb Bell Romanian Deadlift
  1. Start upright feet hip-width apart holding a pair of dumbbells.
  2. Push your hips back to incline your torso while flexing slightly your knees.
  3. Stop when you feel enough tension in your hamstrings and go back to the starting
    position.
  4. Keep your back flat and chest out. The dumbbells should remain close to your legs. Elbows are straight at all times. 
S&C Runners Deadlift
Deadlift
  1. STARTING POSITION: Place your shins approximately 1 inch (3 cm) behind the bar and your feet hip toshoulder-width apart with your toes pointed slightly outward.
  2. Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, grabbing the bar with anoverhand or mixed grip. Keep your back flat with your chest up and out. Keep yourhead in line with your spine,your heels down, and shoulders over the bar.
  3. MOVEMENT:Extend your hips and knees to lift the bar off the floor.
  4. Keep your torso-to-floor angle constant (until the bar meets your knees) andshoulders over bar.
  5. Do not let your hips rise before your shoulders.
  6. As the bar rises just above your knees, push your hips forward to move your kneesunder the bar.
  7. Continue to extend your hips and knees until your body reaches a fully erect torso position.
Single leg sit backs S&C runners exercise
Single Leg Sit Back
  1. Begin by standing upright on one leg in front of a chair or stool.
  2. Push your hips backward like you’re going to sit down and bend your knee into asingle leg squat position to lightly touch the chair with your bottom.
  3. Slowly return to the starting position.Keep your knee aligned with your second toe.
  4. If you find this hard then please do as we did in the room start sitting, stand upusing one leg, place second foot to stand and then sit down with both feet on the ground. 
Single leg sit backs S&C runners exercise
Single Leg Glute Bridge 
  1. Start in crook lying, with legs bent, feet flat on the floor. 
  2. Lift one leg off the floor and go up into a shoulder bridge, peeling one vertebrae at a time.
  3. Keeping the leg out straight and the thigh in line with the other thigh, lower yourself onto the ground and lift yourself back up, peeling one vertebrae at a time.
  4. Repeat this with both legs. 

If you’d like to add some S&C training to your running routine and aren’t sure where to start, get in touch. We’d be happy to put together a specific programme for you. You can then do this independently or for more support, join one of our small group rehab programmes. 


Why Pilates is great for runners

Posted on 1st December 2018 by

Pilates is an effective, mainly mat based, body-conditioning routine designed to increase physical endurance, flexibility, posture, co-ordination, and core strength. It involves focused, controlled movements that can be modified to create different levels of difficulty.

Pilates was developed by a German, Joseph Pilates, in the early 1900’s as a form of exercise for soldiers recovering from injuries in WW1. He then adapted it for use by gymnasts and dancers. This form of Pilates is known as ‘traditional’. There are a host of other types of Pilates too, including Reformer Pilates, which utilises equipment and resistance techniques.

At goPhysio, we teach the APPI method, which is a form of clinical Pilates. The APPI Method is a research based, clinical application of improving the way a person moves and functions in their everyday life. The traditional Pilates exercises have been broken down into clearly defined levels to ensure a standard, gradual progression towards normal, functional movement. This also helps to build a strong foundation to build and progress your core strength on. The core cylinder, the focus of all Pilates movements, consists of the four abdominal groups (external oblique, internal oblique, rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis), the three lower back groups (psoas major, quadratus lumborum, spinalis) as well as the muscles of the buttocks, hips and pelvis.

The core

The ‘core’ plays a key part for any sport – in running, the main purpose is to stabilise and support the spine and trunk, providing a strong centre for the transfer of forces. It helps to make the dynamic leg movements as efficient as possible. Strong core muscles also help to maintain good posture to maximise performance and minimise injury. Reduced core stability can cause excess movement in the trunk, through over rotation. This can lead to a poor running form, which in turn leads to increased fatigue and reduced performance potential. This is due to energy being wasted in the form of excess movement and poor control.

Pilates also has many other benefits for runners

  • Helps to identify any weaknesses that inhibit your running technique. It will provide you with muscular cues to help you fire and strengthen muscles that help you maintain a better running posture, which in turn will reduce the risk of injury and overuse.
  • A strong, balanced body helps you maintain proper form as you fatigue. Pilates helps you loosen your hips, legs and back, all helping you keep a fluid, long stride.
  • Pilates can decrease your recovery time after injury or a strenuous workout by increasing joint mobility, improving flexibility and body awareness.
  • Pilates breathing encourages you to use the diaphragm and control your inhalation/exhalations to assist with movement – this translates into better control during running.
  • Pilates helps to improve hip, pelvic and lumbar spine mobility & flexibility, through the movements and stretches.

We run over 20 classes a week at the clinic and even though they are aren’t targeted specifically at runners, it would be a great addition to your training regime to help with core strength, balance and improved mobility & flexibility.

To find out more about the classes or get started with Pilates, please call us on 023 8025 3317.

Pilates Exercises for runners

Read More 

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6 Great Rehab Exercises For Runners

Posted on 14th November 2018 by

How much movement control do you have when you’re running? And why does it matter? 

There’s a really quick little test you can do to quickly screen stability and control in your leg – just take a look at the video below.

If it looks familiar to you, give the 6 great exercises demonstrated by Sports & Rehabilitation Therapist, Tom, a go.

Why is it important to have good movement control if you’re a runner? 

Many runners lack some crucial areas of control in the key leg muscle groups. Given the repetitive nature of running, often over great distances and with demands of endurance, lack of muscle control can put you at risk of picking up many common overuse injuries.

You can easily do all these exercises at home with a few simple pieces of equipment such as resistive band and a small step.

If you’d like more help or support, we offer a specialised Running Rehab service.

The aim of Running Rehabilitation is to help you:

  • Identify any potential issues with your running style, technique or training schedule.
  • Reduce risk of running related injuries.
  • Improve your running enjoyment and performance.

It’s a completely customised service, focused on you and your running to help you get the most benefit and enjoyment and a long term love for running!

Being pro-active about preventing injuries for runners is well worth the investment! When you’ve seen hundreds of frustrated runners who can’t run because of an injury, the disappointment is awful. So, investing some time doing a few simple exercises like those above is well worth it.

Other related pages that may be of interest to you

Running Injuries – The Basics

Achilles tendon injuries

Runners Knee – Patellofemoral Pain

Common Triathlon Injuries

Plantar Fasciitis

Running Rehab at goPhysio


Celebrating the Eastleigh 10k

Posted on 18th June 2018 by

The Brain Tumour Charity
If you’d like to donate to our chosen charity for your race day massage, please click here. Thank you.

Sunday 17th June finally arrived for the postponed Hendy Eastleigh 10k event. And what a fantastic event it was!

Hat’s off to Steve and his team for pulling together such a well organised event. The friendly, supportive & positive atmosphere was palpable. Seeing all of the local running clubs in their club shirts getting together for pre-race photos and supporting each other was really amazing.

goPhysio felt honoured to have been invited to be part of the event. We were on hand from 7.15am providing pre and post race massages. Our dedicated team of Physio’s, Sports Therapists and Massage Practitioners worked tirelessly and massaged over 150 runners during the morning, as well as providing lot’s of advice and injury help to those with questions or concerns.

We met so many fantastic runners and their supporters throughout the morning. Many had never had sports massage before and commented how much better they felt after it! Some came for a massage both before and after the race.

It sounded like a great run for many, in wonderful conditions, so many people came in celebrating new PB’s. For some it was their first ever 10k, such a great sense of achievement!

 Eastleigh 10k goPhysio massage  goPhysio Team shot at Eastleigh 10k 2018  

Busy goPhysio at Eastleigh 10k  Eastleigh 10k runners massage

We were delighted to be raising money at the event for our chosen charity this year, The Brain Tumour Charity. Thank you so much to all of those who kindly donated on the day. If you came along for a massage and would like to donate, you can do so here online.

Special Offers!

Just a reminder that all race pack special offers from goPhysio have been extended to 31st July. If you quote EASTLEIGH10K you can take advantage of the following:

  • 20% off Sports Therapy Assessments and Treatments (45 minute assessment normally £68 offer price £54.40 / 30 minute treatment normally £48 offer price £38.40)
  • 20% off Sports Massage (60 minutes normally £55 offer price £44 / 30 minutes normally £40 offer price £32)
  • Free Pilates 1-2-1 worth £40

You can use these offers as many times as you like, so if you’ve picked up an injury or want a niggle looked at, take advantage of seeing one of our Sports Therapists. If you’ve had taster of the benefits of sports massage, why not set some time aside for a full appointment. If you’ve heard what wonders Pilates can do for your running – now’s your chance to give it a try! You can book an appointment by calling us on 023 8025 3317 or booking directly online 24/7 here.

Eastleigh 10k Winner
A well deserved massage for the winner of the Eastleigh 10k 2018

 

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