Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Working Out at Home, Injury Free

Posted on 29th April 2020 by

“Now more than ever, it’s important we look after ourselves.” This is the message we’re being given and great advice. Alongside following social distancing and isolation guidelines, looking after ourselves is absolutely key.

One of the main ways in which we can do this is by taking part in regular exercise and activity.

But, for many, this is such a big change in routine and habits, we may be finding ourselves doing something totally new. And this can take it’s toll on the human body.

Whether you’re doing Joe Wicks’ daily PE, running lot’s more to make the most of your ‘daily exercise’ or trying a new dance class online, you need to be just as careful!

So, what steps can you take to make sure you stay injury free?

  1. Start anything new gradually. You may be buzzing to do Joe Wicks 9am PE session every day, but if you’re not used to doing a 30 minute exercise session daily, you need to give your body some time to adapt.
  2. Pace yourself. Try and start with a spaced out schedule and build it up gradually. Your body really needs to be able to adapt gradually to the demands placed upon it
  3. Vary your activities. By all means, try a few online video home workouts, but mix it up by going for a walk or cycle (following latest social distancing rules), a bit or gardening, kick around with the kids or some spring cleaning!
  4. Listen to your body! The same principles to preventing injuries still apply! Lot’s of the exercise videos online are very heavy on the knees and hips, with lot’s of body weight exercises such as squats. lunges, high impact activities. These can really cause issues if you aren’t used to doing this type of exercise or do too many or too often.
  5. Don’t binge! Overall, as we’re not out and about so much, we are naturally moving less throughout the day. So, don’t be tempted to sit all day for hours on end and then suddenly jump up and do a 30 minute workout! It’s a good habit to move regularly throughout the day, so you’re keeping lightly active on a regular basis.

If you do find yourself with a new injury, a persistent ache or pain, then we’re still here for you. We can offer online video physio consultations – read more about these here.

If you’ve always thought about trying Pilates but never had the chance or are finding yourself with a bit more time, we also have a new Pilates Online service, with 4 new classes published every week and access to a whole library of Pilates classes. You can sign up here.

#StayHomeWorkOut


goPhysio Online Shop

Posted on 20th April 2020 by

We’ve pulled together a carefully selected list of products that can help you with your rehab, recovery, Pilates and exercises at home. Take a look at the items and click on the links to be taken through to the individual products that your Clinician has recommended.

PAIN RELIEF


COLD TREATMENTS


FOOT SUPPORTS


EXERCISE AND PILATES EQUIPMENT


MASSAGE


POSTURAL PRODUCTS


BRACES AND SUPPORTS


TAPING AND STRAPPING



How to Foam Roll – The Art of Self-Myofascial Release

Posted on 19th April 2020 by

You may be feeling the effects of either doing too much exercise during lockdown, from tackling daily workouts at home without face to face guidance or tackling exercises your body isn’t used to. Or, it may be the opposite, and the lack of activity from not getting out and about so much is taking its toll. Maybe you’re just missing your regular massage!

The good news is, a foam roller could be your new best friend!

Here’s a quick, no nonsense guide to help ease any tight, achey areas and improve your warm-up, performance and prevent injury with some simple foam rolling! It’s all about the fascia!

What is fascia?

Firstly, fascia is a dense connective tissue that surrounds every muscle, joint and organ in the body.

There are 3 types of fascia; superficial, deep and visceral.

  • Superficial fascia lies just beneath the skin.
  • Deep fascia penetrates and surrounds muscle tissue.
  • Visceral fascia helps keep vital organs in place.

Everything in the body is connected through fascia, but some areas are more connected than others, forming thickened sheaths and bands of fascia. These are bundled together, inseparable from the muscle tissue (myo) and it’s accompanying web of connective tissue (fascia), forming a 3D myo-fascial web throughout the body. Think of a 3D spider’s web in the shape of your body & you’re getting close!

When working optimally, this myo-fascial web helps provide support, stability, movement dynamics, force transmission and optimises sporting performance.

Why should I foam roll?

Trigger Point Grid Foam Roller Foam rolling
We like the Grid Rollers from Trigger Point Therapy

  • For warm-up pre running, as it’s far more effective that static stretching (5)
  • To increase nutrient-rich blood flow to muscles that need it.
  • To improve the mobility and flexibility of muscles and joints (4,6,7).
  • To increase athletic performance (8,9).
  • To recover from exercise faster (1,2,3).
  • To reduce inflammation and remove toxins/chemical waste products.
  • Longer term, to break down adhesions in muscle and connective tissue.
  • You can also successfully self-treat minor injuries such as muscle strains and trigger points.

When should I foam roll? 

  •  MB1 MB5 Trigger Point Roller Ball
    A great alternative to a foam roller is the MB1 or MB5 ball

    Before exercise: when paired with a dynamic warm up to increase blood flow to areas that may be lacking it.

  • After exercise: used within a cool-down procedure to flush out blood that has pooled in working muscles and to allow fresh nutrients and oxygen in to kick start the recovery process.

If you’re used to getting ‘hands on’ treatment but the lockdown means this is no longer possible, this can be a great alternative.

Rolling for only a few minutes can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your training session. So, if you’re stuck for time, pre-exercise rolling would provide most benefit.

How to foam roll

Remember this easy guide and apply it to each muscle group that you’re working on.

  • 4 linear rolls (to search the muscle for areas of tightness, we call these ‘hot spots’).
  • 30 second holds on each hot spot.
  • 4 joint movements (to move the muscle underneath the roller).
  1. Underside of the foot (plantar fascia)

TrP Foot roller Foam rolling

  • Place the roller under the sole of the foot.
  • Apply pressure and roll slowly towards the heel and back to the sole of the foot, 4 times.
  • Hold pressure on any hot spots you may find.
  • Once this hot spot starts to reduce, maintain pressure and add in movement of the toes by flexing and extending them all 4 times.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Calves (gastrocnemius and soleus)TrP Calf Roller
  • Zone A = achilles to mid-calf.
  • Zone B = mid-calf to just below the knee.
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by sitting on the floor with the roller on your Achilles tendon.
  • Place your hands behind you and the other leg on top to add pressure.
  • Roll up and down searching for hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Thighs (quadriceps)
  • Zone A = front of the hip to mid-thigh.
  • Zone B = mid-thigh to just above the knee. TrP Quads
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by lying on your front with the roller at the front of your hip just below the bone.
  • Support yourself with your elbows out in front and the other leg bent up to the side.
  • Roll up and down in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Now, once on a hot spot, bend and straighten the knee 4 times.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Buttock (gluteals and piriformis)
  • Begin by sitting on the roller with your hands behind you for support.
  • Shift your weight onto one side as you bring that leg up and cross it over the other.
  • Aim to have the roller ‘in your back pocket’.TrP Glutes Foam Rolling
  • Roll along the length of your glute in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Upper back (paraspinals, rhomboids, trapezius)
  • Lay on your back with the roller just below the shoulder blades.
  • Place your arms behind your head or cross them in front of your chest.TrP Upper Back Foam Rolling
  • Lift your hips off the floor and use your legs to roll up and down the spine.
  • Carefully extend your back over the roller.
  • Add in side bends to target various muscle groups.
  • Again, if any hot spots are identified, hold this pressure for 30 seconds before moving on.
  1. Chest (pectoralis major/minor)
  • Lay on your front and place the roller (or trigger point ball) just inside the shoulder joint, on the pectoralis tendon. Pec TrP
  • With the arm above the head roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in arm movements to manipulate the soft tissue underneath the roller. 4 straight-arm scoops should do it.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.
  1. Latissimus Dorsi
  • Lay on your side with one arm above your head for support.
  • Place the roller at a 45° angle just underneath your armpit.Lat Dorsi TrP
  • Shift your weight to roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in straight arm movements to release the tissues further, 4 movements followed by 4 rolls.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.

Here’s a handy videos you can watch to help demonstrate some foam rolling techniques.

Check out our YouTube Channel for more videos.

We also have a handy little download for you here: goPhysio Foam Rolling Super Six

If you haven’t got a foam roller, we recommend the TrP Rollers and balls. We can deliver same day to anywhere in the SO53 postcode during this lockdown period, so take a look here for more details.


References

  1. Pearcey GP, Bradbury-Squires DJ, Kawamoto J, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG, Button DC. Foam rolling for delayed-onset muscle soreness and recovery of dynamic performance measures. J Athl Train. 2015;50:5–13.
  2. Macdonald et al. (2014) Macdonald GZ, Button DC, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG. Foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense bout of physical activity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2014;46(1):131–142.
  3. Rey E, Padron-Cabo A, Costa PB, Barcala-Furelos R. The effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool in professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;
  4. Bushell JE, Dawson SM, Webster MM. Clinical relevance of foam rolling on hip extension angle in a functional lunge position. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29:2397–403.
  5. Su H, Chang NJ, Wu WL, Guo LY, Chu IH. Acute effects of foam rolling, static stretching, and dynamic stretching during warm-ups on muscular flexibility and strength in young adults. J Sport Rehabil. 2016; 1-24.
  6. Kelly S., Beardsley C. (2016) Specific and cross-over effects of foam rolling on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy 11(4), 544-551.
  7. Macdonald GZ, Penney M, Mullaley ME, Cuconato AL, Drake CD, Behm DG, Button DC. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force. J Strength Cond Res. 2013;27:812–821.
  8. Peacock CA, Krein DD, Silver TA, Sanders GJ, von Carlowitz KPA. An acute bout of self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling improves performance testing. Int J Exerc Sci. 2014;7:202-211
  9. Monteiro et al. Acute effects of different self-massage volumes on the FMS overhead deep squat performance. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017; 12(1): 94-104.
  10. Monteiro ER Correa Neto VG. Effect of different foam rolling volumes on knee extension fatigue. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2016;11(7):1076‐1081.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Staying Active During Isolation

Posted on 17th April 2020 by

As the coronavirus has spread across the World and lockdown continues, many more individuals are being asked to stay at home in order to protect themselves and others. Gyms, parks and other fitness/health facilities are closed for the time being. All of the sudden, everyone’s level of activity has been reduced, which can pose a significant challenge for our mental and physical well-being. 

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), “physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality”. 

Everyone, whether, they were active or not before the quarantine, needs to avoid this sudden sedentarism as much as possible. 

How much activity should I do? 

The recommendations are very simple: 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week, or a combination of both (WHO). Read more here.

That means you only need to do:

  • 3 x 50 min sessions a week or;
  • 5 x 30 min sessions a week or;
  • 7 x 22 min sessions a week 

in order to stay active, healthy and reduce your risk of mortality. 

What activities should I do?

There is plenty of activities you can do at home to keep yourself active:

  • Gardening: The Spring is coming; it is time to show off your gardening skills! Read more about gardening injury free here.
  • Walking: get up every 30 minutes, walk around the house, around the garden or up and down the stairs. Give your sofa a rest! Take inspiration from the legend Captain Tom!
  • Dancing: why not? The clubs are closed but that doesn’t mean you can’t have fun at home. Get the whole family moving in a dance off competition!
  • Cleaning: now it’s your opportunity to finally get your garage or loft cleaned and organised. You’d be amazed at how much exercise a bit of cleaning actually involves.
  • Try an online exercise class or challenge: there is plenty of information online. You can look for videos on YouTube or sign up for online classes. You can also follow us on our Pilates Facebook Group or goPhysio Facebook Community Group, where we have been uploading exercises you can do at home, challenges and tips on how to manage your health during this quarantine. We’ve also just launched an online Pilates video platform, where you can have access to 16 new Pilates classes a month for just £29 with a FREE 7 day trial. Subscribe now here.

Being healthy is not only about physical activity. Mental health is very important and there’s plenty of ways you can exercise your mind:

  • Establish a routine: whether you’re still working from home or not, keep a routine. The disruption of your normal routine can leave you feeling lost, trying to figure out how to fill all the hours in the day. If you’re at home with the kids, try to plan out activities that will keep everyone busy so you can get some work done. Plan your day, make up your own routine to save you from the monotony. 
  • Be physically active: healthy body, healthy mind.
  • Communicate: time to catch up with old friends and family. Reach out to others. We are all going through the same, we all appreciate some talking. If you’re at home with the family, try to have your meals together and talk. No TV or phones allowed.
  • Relax: time to catch up with all the reading you wanted to do on holiday. Give meditation a try. Have you ever tried Yoga or Tai Chi? Now you’ve got the time, use it!
  • Practice mindfulness: use this time of enforced isolation to slow down and be mindful. We normally live such a fast paced life, we don’t have that luxury, so now’s a great time to give it a try! Read more here.
  • Laugh: time to watch you favourite comedy shows or movies, get the whole family together and play some board games, watch some funny videos and “memes” online. As Eric Idle once sang “Always look on the bright side of life”.

We are all in this together and soon we’ll be back to normality. 

Until then enjoy the gift of time. Use it wisely and stay active. 


Staying active whilst in isolation

What level of Pilates should I do?

Posted on 8th April 2020 by

A question we get asked a lot at goPhysio, as people become familiar with Pilates or have been coming for some time, is

What level class should I do?

We offer 3 levels of mat based Pilates classes, Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced. This follows the APPI training concept, which all of our Instructors have completed.

Now there is access to so many online classes, with less in person and face to face support, it is even more important that people are advised what level of classes to take part in.

At goPhysio, if you’ve been attending any of our Pilates classes for a while, we keep an eye on you and will suggest when we think is the right time for you to try and progress up a level. Without that guidance, Physio & Pilates Instructor, Roz, has put in place fantastic guide to help you identify what you.

So, are you ready to progress and challenge yourself with the next level?

Follow the diagram below to see what skill set you require to start each level.

Challenge yourselves during this time of isolation with our online Pilates classes

Then book a 1:1 review when the clinic re-opens and see if you have met that challenge and are ready to progress to the next level.



goPhysio Rehab Shop

Posted on 7th April 2020 by

We’ve made available some of the rehab equipment we have at goPhysio to help you at this time. With so many shops closed and many items like this now unavailable, we thought it may help some.

We are offering all of these items with FREE delivery to anyone in the SO53 postcode only. Order before 12pm and we’ll deliver that day, after 12pm will be next day delivery.

If you’re not based in SO53, but would still like the option to purchase some equipment to help with your rehab, recovery or activity, please click here, which will take you through to our recommended supplier.

Take a look, and if you’d benefit from any of these items, please do get in touch. We offer a safe and secure online payment system for all your orders.

How do I buy?

  1. Look at the available items above and descriptions below.
  2. Email the details of what you would like to purchase to fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk, including:
    1. The item name
    2. How many you’d like to purchase and colour preference (if a colour choice)
    3. Your name and delivery address (SO53 deliveries only please)
  3. You will be emailed an invoice and link to make your secure card payment.
  4. Payment is required prior to delivery.
  5. Any orders placed and paid for by 12pm will be eligible for free same day delivery.
  6. Orders placed after 12pm will be delivered the next day.
  7. All deliveries will be handled with social distancing guidelines. We will knock at the door, leave the item on the doorstep and wait a safe distance away to acknowledge delivery.

Item Descriptions

Pilates Ball – A soft Pilates ball, often used during our classes or with patients with neck pain, to add challenge, support and variety. Comes with straw to inflate. Blue. £9.50

Grid Foam Roller – A 12″ foam roller, with dense ‘grid’ exterior and a rigid, hollow core. Available in black, orange & pink. Comes with our ‘Foam Roller Super 6’ exercises sheet. £39.99.

Grid Mini Roller – A compact version of our full size roller, highly durable, 5″ roller. Available in black or orange. £24.99.

Biofreeze or Ice Storm Pain Relieving Gel – Targeted, effective pain relieving gel to help ease muscular or soft tissue aches and pains. Ice Storm 100ml, Biofreeze 118ml. 1 supplied (please state preference). £9.99

K Tape – Durable, flexible kinesiology tape availability;able in flesh, pink or black. £15.99

Lumbar Roll – Perfect to provide extra support to your lower back when seated. Available in ‘D’ shaped or ‘O’ shaped options. Complete with strap to secure to chair. £22.99

MB1 Trigger Point Ball – A great alternative to a foam roller, to get into the smaller, tight, painful areas and relieve areas of tension and pain. £14.99

MB5 Trigger Point Ball – A larger sized trigger point ball, to ease aches, pains and tension. A great alternative to the foam roller. £27.99

Nano Foot Roller – Designed to increase flexibility and relieve minor muscular aches and pains associated with the foot and forearm. Perfect for plantar fasciitis. Available in two densities, regular (orange) and the extra-firm NANO X for intense relief (black). £22.99

Omni Massage Roller – Ease aches and pains with this targeted massage roller. You can use this yourself or with help of someone else in harder to reach areas, Perfect for shoulder, neck and leg pains. Available in blue, black. green or red. £17.99

Orthopaedic Pillow – Suffering with neck pain or headaches? A supportive, orthopaedic pillow could be your answer. Offering excellent support whilst you sleep. £59.99

Pilates Socks – Are you spending your time practising Pilates at home? These socks offer excellent grip and support whilst you exercise. Available in black or turquoise. £9.99

Spikey Balls – A great way to ease areas of tension or pain, in your foot, arm, back or leg muscles. Small (orange or green) £7, Medium (yellow) £9, Large (blue or red) £11.

Resistance Exercise Band – Useful for practicing your resisted strengthening and stability exercises. Varying resistance from yellow (easiest), red, green, blue, through to black (hardest). 1m length £5.

Therapearl Wraps – Reusable hot and cold packs for pain relief. Gel pearls, that remain flexible to accommodate the area and hold the temperature. Comes with a handy strap to keep in place. 3 options available:

  1. Back wrap – for lower back area £24.99
  2. Neck wraps – for neck and shoulder are £24.99
  3. Sports wrap – a smaller pack for legs, ankle, elbow, wrist etc. £17.99

Neck Heat Pack – A non-lavender filled heat pack for the neck and shoulder area. Gently eases aches and pains, softly moulds to the area and holds warmth in a comforting way. £17.99

Vulkan Support Straps – Trying to keep active but pain stopping you? Worried about an old or ongoing injury but can’t get help? A support can be really helpful to give you more confidence. We have the following supports available:

  1. Vulkan ankle wrap £17.99
  2. Vulkan knee wrap £17.99
  3. Vulkan patella strap £19.99

We can also offer online video consultations, if you need help or guidance using any of the equipment or with your injury. Take a look here for more information.



Avoid Gardening Pains

Posted on 2nd April 2020 by

Spring is upon us and it’s that time of year to get out in that garden, tackle those weeds and start to prepare for the nicer weather – whether it’s out of choice or because someone has nagged you to do it!

Here are our top tips to avoid injury, whether you’re gardening, painting the shed or washing the patio!

Warm up before starting

You wouldn’t go for a run or start a gym workout without warming up your body – so make sure you do the same before you start work. Go for a brisk walk around the garden, get the blood circulating round your body & do a few gentle stretches to loosen your muscles before you start that weeding!

Cool down when you finish

Same as tip number one – make sure you wind down to a stop and do some more gentle stretches when you finish to stop your muscles stiffening up after your activity. Don’t just sit down and admire your hard work (as tempting as it might be!).

Pace yourself!

With the longer days, bank holiday weekends and nicer weather, it’s tempting to do all the work in one day to keep the rest of your time free or keep going for long periods – but this could lead to overworked and over strained muscles and joints. Spread your jobs out evenly over the days, evenings and weekend and build up to the harder jobs.

Variety is key

Try to avoid spending time in prolonged positions – by varying your tasks, you will limit the strain you put on each body part. For example, do 30 minutes of weeding, 30 minutes of digging and then 30 minutes of mowing the lawn. Put some mini breaks in between each job to have a rest, stretch and drink.

Avoid twisting

Keep your feet facing the same way as your hips and shoulders – this stops any rotational strain through your body. Stand straight as you mow the lawn or push a wheelbarrow and keep everything you need close by to avoid twisting to reach it.

Keep everything at the correct height

If you are working at a bench, make sure you don’t have to crouch or stretch to reach it – this could put extra strain on your back. If you’re working at a height, use a ladder or step to stop straining your neck by looking up for long periods.

Lift with your knees, not your back

When lifting heavy objects, make sure to bend your hips and knees to help support your back. Holding the object closer to your body will also help reduce any extra strain – so make sure to wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty!

If you do injure yourself – don’t panic! Have a look back at our previous blogs on using heat vs ice and the ‘POLICE’ method of self treatment. If in doubt, give our friendly Patient Care Team a call and book an appointment with one of Physiotherapists at goPhysio. We’ll be able to assess, diagnose and treat any injury and give you the best advice on how to treat and prevent another episode!

You can also book an appointment online 24/7 here