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It’s all about LOAD!

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

We appreciate you guys don’t want to get bogged down with the science, research or evidence behind the ways we help you – you just want us to help you recover from your injury, quickly!

But to us, the science and latest evidence is important, it helps us get the best results for you in the best way. So we always get a little bit excited when we see or read what the latest evidence is saying (especially when it’s presented in a fab infographic!).

This infographic, that was shared by Trust me, I’m a Physiotherapist, really highlights the power of loading.

Load & Strength Chandlers Ford

LOADING is currently a bit of a ‘buzz’ word in the physio & rehab circles. And with good reason. In recovery terms, rest isn’t often the best way forwards but progressive loading is! As the infographic above summarises, many of the body’s tissues will get stronger if they are subject to loading.

So, what exactly is loading?

The definition of load is………..

A weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something.

In exercise or rehab terms, loading means working with some weight or resistance to place greater demands on your body. So, that can be using just your body weight, some light resistance, like bands or machines, or using weights. So, running is loading – you’re loading all the structures in your legs (bones, muscles, joints, tendons & ligaments) through the repeated pressure between your foot striking the surface with every step. A press up loads the structures around your shoulder and arms, just as a squat loads your hips and knees. Now, if you add holding a weight whilst you squat, you are increasing the load.

What is important is that loading is gradually progressed. You don’t want to demand too much of your body too quickly (or too often), especially if you’re recovering from an injury, as this will be counterproductive. It’s a careful balance.

The ultimate result of all this loading is that you will have a stronger and more resilient body. It will cope better with the demands placed upon it, making you less prone to picking up injuries, helping you enjoy an active lifestyle and potentially preventing longterm conditions such as osteoporosis.

Put simply, your tissues will adapt to the demands you place upon them.

If you think you would benefit from some guidance on realising the benefits of loading, then do get in touch. Our fully equipped Strong Room and experienced team offer that unique combination of being able to guide you on progressive loading within your own limits. We consider your ‘whole picture’ – where you are now, any injuries or conditions that affect you, what you love (or would love) to do and most importantly where you want to be. We then use our knowledge, experience and skills to tailor a programme just for you and support you as much or as little as you need.

Give us a call or drop us an email to find out more.


Strength & Conditioning For Runners

Posted on 18th December 2018 by

Alongside running (obviously) it’s great for runners to have a good mix of activities as part of their training.

Why? Well, not only does it help prevent injury by mixing up the demands placed upon your body from repetitive activity, it also gives the opportunity to build strength, flexibility and other aspects of fitness that will actually help your running. Exercises like Pilates can be great for helping optimise your movement control but equally important is brining in some specific strength and conditioning work. 

Here we’d like to share with you Sports & Rehab Therapist Francesca’s top picks for S&C exercises that are great for runners. All of these can be done with or without weight and progressed as and when appropriate. Strength training should be completed at least once a week along side your running.

Dumb bell romain deadlift S&C runners
Dumb Bell Romanian Deadlift
  1. Start upright feet hip-width apart holding a pair of dumbbells.
  2. Push your hips back to incline your torso while flexing slightly your knees.
  3. Stop when you feel enough tension in your hamstrings and go back to the starting
    position.
  4. Keep your back flat and chest out. The dumbbells should remain close to your legs. Elbows are straight at all times. 
S&C Runners Deadlift
Deadlift
  1. STARTING POSITION: Place your shins approximately 1 inch (3 cm) behind the bar and your feet hip toshoulder-width apart with your toes pointed slightly outward.
  2. Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, grabbing the bar with anoverhand or mixed grip. Keep your back flat with your chest up and out. Keep yourhead in line with your spine,your heels down, and shoulders over the bar.
  3. MOVEMENT:Extend your hips and knees to lift the bar off the floor.
  4. Keep your torso-to-floor angle constant (until the bar meets your knees) andshoulders over bar.
  5. Do not let your hips rise before your shoulders.
  6. As the bar rises just above your knees, push your hips forward to move your kneesunder the bar.
  7. Continue to extend your hips and knees until your body reaches a fully erect torso position.
Single leg sit backs S&C runners exercise
Single Leg Sit Back
  1. Begin by standing upright on one leg in front of a chair or stool.
  2. Push your hips backward like you’re going to sit down and bend your knee into asingle leg squat position to lightly touch the chair with your bottom.
  3. Slowly return to the starting position.Keep your knee aligned with your second toe.
  4. If you find this hard then please do as we did in the room start sitting, stand upusing one leg, place second foot to stand and then sit down with both feet on the ground. 
Single leg sit backs S&C runners exercise
Single Leg Glute Bridge 
  1. Start in crook lying, with legs bent, feet flat on the floor. 
  2. Lift one leg off the floor and go up into a shoulder bridge, peeling one vertebrae at a time.
  3. Keeping the leg out straight and the thigh in line with the other thigh, lower yourself onto the ground and lift yourself back up, peeling one vertebrae at a time.
  4. Repeat this with both legs. 

If you’d like to add some S&C training to your running routine and aren’t sure where to start, get in touch. We’d be happy to put together a specific programme for you. You can then do this independently or for more support, join one of our small group rehab programmes. 


Train for the slopes

Posted on 1st November 2018 by

Ski holiday goPhysio

Skiing and snowboarding are a fantastic form of exercise, challenging both our muscles and our cardio vascular system in an extremely enjoyable way. Both require a significant amount of strength and endurance to stay on the slopes for the duration of holiday.  Unfortunately, most of us have not prepared enough in advance to meet the demands of what is required.

Most of the injuries we see in the clinic throughout the year are not as a result of a sudden traumatic injury, like a big fall leading to a broken bone. Instead, the most common injuries are a result of an imbalance between the loads/stresses we put through our body versus their ability to tolerate that load.  The level of tolerance we have is variable and is constantly changing in adaption to our current activity levels.  For example, a marathon runner training to do a marathon can gradually adapt to slowly building their weekly mileage over the training program so that they can tolerate the full 26.2 miles.  If they then don’t run for a few months they wouldn’t be able to run another marathon again without have to train again as their level of tolerance would slowly ebb away leaving them prone to an injury.

Exactly the same applies to skiing and boarding injuries. 

Now unfortunately, the UK doesn’t have many mountains to get some regular practice on!  This means that skiing/snowboarding tends to be something we don’t do all year then suddenly we go away and are on the mountain for 5 hours or so for 6 days a week straight.  That is a dramatic and sudden change in the load and demands we put through our body.  This increase in demand can cause the tissues to become sensitive and painful.  This then causes them to lose tolerance (their ability to cope)  and can mean that everyday activities can start to aggravate them further (more commonly known as an overuse injury). Such injuries then tend to become a vicious cycle of pain, rest, recover, start exercising again, pain, rest………a cycle that needs to be broken to avoid you having to limit what you do and have a life impacted by recurrent pain.

The good news is, you can do a lot to prevent getting such an injury on the slopes. 

Whilst it is difficult to practice skiing/snowboarding in advance of going (there are indoor slopes and dry skiing slopes around, which we encourage you to visit in advance to get used to the demands) you can still take measures to reduce the risks of such overuse injuries. By training your body in another way, we can help give it the ability to deal with the demands that we are likely to put through it over the course of the holiday. 

Over the course of a week, just imagine what physical demands are placed on your body during such a physical task such as skiing or snowboarding?!

To prepare for this, you can increase your body’s ability to cope with those increased demands by strengthening and conditioning your body, which will increase it’s tolerance levels. The best way of doing this is through doing specific strengthening exercises.  Whilst bodyweight exercises are a good start, the ideal method would be through resistance training using weights or resistance machines.

However, the weights area of a gym can be a daunting place if you’ve never used weights before, and even if you have, what are the best exercises to do? What muscles or areas should you target for skiing or boarding? How many repetitions? How many sets? It can all be very confusing!

Let us help you!

Here at goPhysio we’ve set up a specialist exercise programme aimed at getting you prepared for skiing/snowboarding and giving you an introduction into strength training in a friendly, supportive and knowledgeable environment. 

If you’re interested in getting the most out of your holiday, now’s the time to start! (You’d be shocked to hear how many people come in 5 days before their holiday with a knee injury they’ve had for 6 months, wanting us to wave a magic wand!!)

  1. Your first session will be a 1-2-1 Snow Start Up Session. In this practical 1 hour session, Physio Chris will find out more about you and your skiing or boarding level, any injuries or concerns, your fitness and holiday plans. From this he will create a bespoke, guided exercise programme for you to do at goPhysio over the following weeks. This session will be led by Physio Chris, who has previously worked with British ParaSnowSport, bringing his experience into selecting the most suitable exercises to getting you ready for the slopes.
  2. 5 x 1 hour Practical Sessions During each of your 5 following 1 hour practical sessions, you will work on your program alongside 2 other attendees, in our fully equipped Strong Room. This will be under the guidance and supervision of one of our Sports & Rehabilitation Therapists, who will be on hand to adjust your exercises, add new challenges and monitor your progress. You can do 1 session a week or 2 sessions a week – we can be flexible to accommodate your timings!
  3. Review Once you’ve come to the end of your 5 sessions, Physio Chris will carry out a review of your progress, and support you with your goals from there!

This package costs £210 (payable in advance) and you can book your Snow Start Up by calling 023 8025 3317.

Want to read more about skiing or snowboarding injuries? Take a look at these other articles:

The benefit of Pilates for winter sports

5 Tips to Survive the Slopes this Winter

More about Physio Chris and his Snowsport experience


 

 


Get Ready For The Slopes

Posted on 13th October 2017 by

Ski fit The end of 2018 is fast approaching, and we’re already seeing people full of excitement about their upcoming snow holidays for the end of the year and into 2019.

Each and every year we get panicked phone calls from people with injuries that have niggled on for months, who are off on their snow holidays in the next few days. We do our best to help however we can, but the human body needs time and investment to perform at it’s best, so we can’t work miracles overnight!

Skiing and snow boarding are very physically demanding. These holidays involve an intense period of activity. They are also precious time away with friends and family and don’t come cheap! So, you need to make sure your body can cope with the demands so you can really make the most of your holiday!

Our top tips

  1. Get any ongoing or niggling injuries sorted now. Don’t wait until the week before you go away. There can be very simple and effective ways of resolving injuries once you know what’s going on and have a personalised recovery plan. The ‘wait and see’ approach can sometimes pay off, but if you have a physical challenge coming up, ask yourself is it worth risking it?
  2. Think about starting Pilates. Taking part in a few months of Pilates can have a massive impact on your strength, stability and movement control. Read more about the benefit of Pilates for winter sports here. 
  3. Do some specific strength and conditioning work to make sure you’re fit for the slopes. If you want a customised, specific programme, think about our small group rehab sessions with our Sports Therapy team. We have specific skiing and snowboarding sessions, led by Snowsport Physio Chris.

Read More

5 Tips to survive the slopes this winter

The benefits of Pilates for winter sports