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goPhysio FAQs: What conditions can you help?

Posted on 31st August 2018 by

goPhysio FAQHere at goPhysio we understand that choosing to see a someone if you’re injured or in pain may be a bit daunting? Lots of questions may go through your mind before you decide to make an appointment……….“What will they ask me? Will it hurt? Will I have to get undressed? How do I know it’s going to help?”

We aim to provide a very caring, comfortable and professional environment for you to come and get your problem resolved.

To help answer some of the thoughts you may have if you’re unsure about picking up the phone to make an appointment, we’d like to address some of the questions you may want to ask.


What conditions can you help?

As Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists at goPhysio, our  specialist area of expertise is in assessing, diagnosing and resolving musculoskeletal issues. Musculo = muscles, Skeletal = skeleton (bones, joints, nerves, ligaments, tendons). So, most conditions affecting those areas, we can help.

Here’s a (not exhaustive) list of some of the most common conditions we help resolve here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford.

Back

Neck

Hip Problems

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Hip impingement
  • Gilmore’s groin
  • Groin strain
  • Total hip replacement
  • ITB issues
  • Piriformis syndrome

Knee Problems

  • Anterior knee pain
  • Ligament injuries (Anterior, posterior, medial & lateral cruciate ligaments)
  • Cartilage (meniscus) injuries
  • Hamstring strain
  • Runners knee
  • Muscle strain or tear (quadriceps, hamstrings)
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Osgoods Schlatters 
  • ITB syndrome

Ankle & Foot

Shoulder

Elbow, Wrist & Hand

And not forgetting……..

If you are suffering with an injury and want help to guide you through the frustrating maze, please get in touch. We aim to offer you an appointment within 24 hours, often the same day.

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Reach New Heights This Summer With Young Rehab

Posted on 27th July 2018 by

The extra free time over the summer holidays creates a perfect window of time to get you child Young Rehab Summer goPhysiostarted in our Young Rehabilitation sessions in our Strong Room at goPhysio.

These sessions are a great way to get the kids away from screens and to develop their strength and durability to take them into next their next season of sport.  This can help to reduce the risk of future injuries as well as recovery from existing injuries and niggles.  As well as this, it can generally increase their confidence in movement and teach them another form of exercise that they continue with.

The young rehab classes start with a 45 mins session with one of our Sports and Rehab Therapists where participants are set a bespoke programme tailored to their specific goals and sport.  The remaining 4 sessions are run in groups of up to 3 people under direct supervision.

Sessions are booked as blocks of 5 sessions lasting 45 minutes which includes the initial 1-2-1 session.  Each block costs £150. These could be taken as one per week taking them up to the end of the summer holidays or could also be taken more regularly to gain some momentum and maximise what they get from the sessions.

We understand that you may be going away at some point over Summer and that other plans will come up.  For that reason we are flexible and classes can be booked in at various times each week or moved forward to another week to work around your plans.* Sessions can be booked throughout the week, including Saturday mornings and right up until 8pm during the week.

Who might benefit from Young Rehab?

Kids and teens often go through some big changes between the ages of 10 – 14 as they experience a high rate of growth. Combined with lot’s of sports and physical activities, the growing body can sometimes struggle and pain and injury rears it’s head. This can be highly frustrating, as G.P.s will often advise these youngsters to just rest – but try telling that to a competitive teenager who loves sport! Young Rehab provides a great way to support these kids in staying active and getting back to their sport as quick as possible.

We’ve had many kids experience the benefit of of Young Rehab here at goPhysio.

We’ve seen a large number of young gymnasts and dancers. These athletes often have wonderful flexibility but can lack stability, strength and movement control in key areas. This in turn can lead to some common injuries such as knee pain.

Kids who participate in sports with lots of repeated movements also frequently seek our help. Kicking a football, swimming and tennis are great examples. These youngsters are often training or competing many times a week and sometimes their growing bodies just can’t cope.

It’s not only for the very sporty kids – growing children by the very nature of growing can experience aches and pains that can be effectively managed by learning some key exercises.

If you are interested in booking your child in, or you have any questions then please do not hesitate to contact the clinic on 023 8025 3317.  We can get started immediately!

*A 24 hour cancellation policy applies. All sessions must be used within 3 months of the 1st appointment.

Read More 

Young Rehab – All you need to know

Growing Pains – Knee pain in kids and teens

Sever’s Disease

Why youngsters should play multiple sports

 

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Introducing goPhysio’s Newest Team Member

Posted on 13th July 2018 by

Chris Tiley Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games
Chris at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

goPhysio are delighted to welcome the 12th member of the team, our 5th Physiotherapist, Chris Tiley MCSP.

Chris has joined the Physo and Pilates team on a full time basis, working Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and every other Saturday. Here’s a little introduction to Chris.

“After graduating from Coventry University in 2008, I started practicing physiotherapy in Canada. For 18 months I worked initially in the ski resort of Whistler Blackcomb and then in Vancouver before heading back to the UK.  Since my return I have worked in the Berkshire area within private hospitals and private practices and then more recently in a private practice in Bournemouth.

Throughout my career I have had a keen interest in sport and pursued this within physiotherapy and personally.  I have worked with Reading FC academy for 6 seasons which has given me invaluable experience within a large sporting organisation.  This lead to an amazing experience volunteering at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow where I spent the majority of my time working within Rugby 7’s as well as covering some of the table tennis events.

I then spent 2 seasons as one of the physiotherapists for British Parasnowsport, working and travelling with elite skiers and snowboarders with varying disabilities.  This has involved travelling abroad for the training camps and competitions. One of the highlights was being part of the Winter X-Games in Aspen, Colorado with one of our athletes who competed in the adaptive boarder cross race.

My experiences through my various roles have given me invaluable assessment and treatment skills throughout many areas of physiotherapy including: sports injuries, back/neck pain, chronic pain and post operative physiotherapy to name a few. I have also completed level 1 and 2 APPI Pilates matwork training.

Outside of work I enjoy participating in several sports and activities.  I regularly run and have completed the London Marathon twice and multiple half marathons.  I like to cycle and have taken part in several Sportive’s including the Prudential Ride 100.  I enjoy playing racquet sports, indoor climbing and have recently taken up golf.

For further information about myself or the treatments on offer at the clinic please contact me on: chris@gophysiotherapy.co.uk or call the clinic on 023 8025 3317.”

Chris with the Parasnowsport Snowboard Team
Chris with the Parasnowsport Snowboard Team

 

Chris with the British Parasnowsport Alpine Ski Team at the 2015 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships
Chris with the British Parasnowsport Alpine Ski Team at the 2015 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships

 

Chris at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games with the Papua New Guinea Rugby Sevens Team
Chris at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games with the Papua New Guinea Rugby Sevens Team

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To tape or not to tape?

Posted on 26th February 2018 by

When it comes to tape, taping and strapping, things can get a little confusing due to the shear number of different tapes on the market, application methods, reported effects, when to use them, etc.

This blog aims to shed some light on four of the most common tapes out there by describing what they are, why you’d use each them and at what times to use them.

First up, Leukotape Leukotape at goPhysio Taping

  • Used for stabilising joints following injury or during rehabilitation to prevent reoccurrences.
  • Also used to offload painful structures such as irritate knees or hips.
  • This is a non-stretchy, 100% rigid tape that will cause a decrease in range of motion when applied correctly.
  • It has a high adhesive strength which allows it to stick well to skin, and even better to hyperfix (white underlay).
  • It’s 100% cotton which makes it skin-friendly, handy for hikers or runners looking to avoid blisters.
  • Drawbacks: non-elastic and range limiting.

Zinc Oxide Tape Zinc Oxide Tape goPhysio Taping

  • Similar to Leukotape, this white tape offers a little more comfort but with the same rigid properties.
  • Used to protect and stabilise joints for injury prevention.
  • Lighter and less bulky than a brace, this tape will conform to the shape of a joint to provide support.
  • Very popular in climbers to protect the joints of the hand and fingers.
  • Drawbacks: restrictive, range limiting and ineffective if used on oily or sweaty skin.

Kinesiology Tape (K Tape)

  • A popular cotton-based, water-resistant tape with various effects on the applied tissues.
  • This is the colourful tape you often see on athletes or sports people. K Tape goPhysio Taping
  • Lymphatic effects: creates a vertical lift from underlying tissues which decompresses the space between the skin and the muscles. This facilitates blood flow, fluid drainage (management of bruising) and the removal of pain-provoking chemicals from injured tissues.
  • Mechanical effects: longitudinal stretch of up to 180% provides stability and elastic resistance to muscles, ligaments and tendons.
  • Neurological effects: creates a stimulus on the skin that reduces pain signals received by the brain (pain-relief). The vertical lift will also reduce pressure on free nerve endings to help reduce pain levels.
  • Drawbacks: can cause skin irritation if applied incorrectly. Can occasionally cause allergic skin reactions. Application can be complex. Research on the effectiveness of this tape is inconclusive.

Dynamic Tape 

  • A synthetic material (nylon and lyrca) with 4-way stretch.
  • Strong elastic properties make this the ultimate biomechanical tape, with stretch capabilities of up to 200% of it’s resting length.
  • Great adhesion means it will last longer, even when worn during vigorous exercise or in the shower.Dynamic Tape goPhysio Taping
  • When applied correctly this tape will offload injured tissues and offer elastic resistance when performing exercise.
  • This purely biomechanical, load-absorbing tape reduces the force on injured tissues, assists weak muscles, provides support during eccentric loading and improves movement patterns.
  • This tape can also lift the skin if applied accordingly, to facilitate the removal of bruises or relieve tension on underlying structures.
  • Drawbacks: can cause skin irritation and the stronger dynamic tape (eco tape) can reduce mobility quite considerably.

So, in a nutshell……

  • Opt for Leukotape or Zinc Oxide to immobilise and protect joints, the latter offering slightly more comfort but being less durable.
  • Choose K Tape for its range of potential effects, but remember that it lacks strong elastic properties to facilitate movement with any real support.
  • If you need strong, elastic support choose Dynamic Tape. It can be applied in a number of ways to work just as muscles do, which supports tissues and improves movement patterns.

If you have any doubt on the application or desired effects of taping, make an appointment to see one of our team at our clinic in Chandlers Ford, Hampshire. Just give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

 

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Running injury? When to get help and who to see!

Posted on 18th January 2018 by

Injuries are part and parcel of sport, exercise and running. But when is it OK to manage the injury yourself and when do you need to get help?

Firstly, our bodies are designed to heal naturally from injury over a period of a few weeks, depending on the severity of the injury and nature of the condition.

However, being sensible is the key. If we fall and suddenly we have a swollen, painful, red/bruised limb, then we should seek immediate attention in A&E or a walk in centre. If you’re unsure which to use, calling 111 to get a healthcare professional to help you with all your enquiries.

However, if you’re suffering with a less severe or ongoing overuse injury in your soft tissues (muscle, tendon, ligaments) or joints, which is taking a long time to settle i.e. lower back pain, knee pain, or a sports injury,  then seeing your G.P. or a Physiotherapist, is your best option.

Unfortunately, the reality waiting to see your GP if you’ve got an injury only serves to delay your recovery. Most will advise rest in the first instance and maybe painkillers, and ask you to come back in 6 weeks if it isn’t better (sound familiar?). Have a look at a previous blog post we wrote ‘The magic 6 weeks‘.

Eventually they may refer you to an NHS physio, and there’ll be more waiting for an appointment, which can be up to 18 weeks or more locally! That’s 6 months plus of potential pain, suffering and not doing some of the things you enjoy.

However, most private Physio’s accept direct referrals, minimising any hold ups in your treatment, giving you peace of mind and a positive action plan, without any delays. Clinically, physiotherapy is justified from day 1 of an injury – competitive and elite sports men and women will have immediate physio.

However, for the general population, the ideal time to see a physiotherapist will depend on the severity and nature of your condition and your aims and goals.

If you have a severe painful injury that stops you from running (or exercising) and you’re due to run a marathon event in 4 weeks – immediate Physio is crucial.

If an injury stops you from going to work and you’re self employed – immediate physio is highly cost effective! We see so many people that can’t work because of an injury and if they aren’t getting paid, the cost of private treatment to get them back to work quicker is actually very cost effective.

If you have minor injury that is improving steadily, you can avoid the aggravating factors and don’t mind not being so active for a while, then you could attempt to self treat your injury. However, with this comes the potential risk of re-injury when you return to the causative activities.

If your injury isn’t improving and you want to get back to a high level of activity, i.e. golf x 2 weekly or gardening, then Physio is important to help you return to your activities and prevent re-injury.

There’s an old, well known saying “time is the best healer”, but where injury is concerned, this is a myth!

Essentially, if your injury is not improving within 5-7 days, you need to see an adequately qualified and experienced physiotherapist. The longer you delay seeing someone, taking the ‘wait & see approach’, the longer it will take you to get better and the more it will cost you in pain, effort, time, money and frustration at not doing the things you enjoy.

Who to see?

We understand there’s an overwhelming choice of healthcare providers and it can be a stressful experience choosing which therapy or clinic is best for you. The lines between different therapies are merging, making your choice of therapy and clinic more complex as Chiropractor’s give exercises, Physio’s do manipulations and Personal Trainers do rehabilitation.

From your perspective we’re all the same – you just want to see someone who can get you better! A good clue when deciding which profession to see, is to consider who the professionals use to look after their bodies? In professional sports, from cycling to football, rugby to the Olympics, it’s a Chartered Physiotherapist that is trusted to sort out injuries, they’re the ones you’ll see run out onto the pitch. There’s obviously a good reason for this. Physiotherapy is also the 3rd largest health profession in the UK after Doctors and Nurses.

Physiotherapy is a proven strategy for in the first instance, easing the worries and concerns of people suffering from aches, pain and stiffness. And then helping that person move freely again, bending further, stretching easier, feeling healthier and stronger and living an active, fulfilled lifestyle into their 40’s, 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and beyond.

Here at goPhysio we will offer you an appointment within 24 hours of you getting in touch. It’s YOU that matters and for that reason our care is focused on listening to you, solving your injury problems and achieving your goals.

The sooner you take the time and effort to invest in your health and wellbeing with physiotherapy, you’ll be back doing all the things you enjoy.

If you need a solution to your running injury, don’t delay – you can book your appointment online here now.


 


Andy Murray’s Trigger Point Ball 1 of our favourites too!

Posted on 13th July 2017 by

Andy Murray Trp Ball Tennis star, Andy Murray, was recently pictured with a Trigger Point ball tucked firmly under his arm.

The MB5 Massage Trigger Point ball that Andy is holding is one of our best sellers in the our clinic. A great alternative or adjunct to a foam roller, it can be used to ease off areas of tension, as part of a warm up or cool down and to help get into those painful, tight areas.

goPhysio Trigger Point Massage

Suitable for use on all the major muscle groups, we often recommend a TrP release series as part of a comprehensive warm up. We also sell the smaller MB1 ball (pictured above), which is great for smaller areas such as feet and forearms.

The good thing about these products is that they are made for a number of different layers, with multi-density, making them super long lasting and very durable , so they don’t compress and loose their efficiency over time. They also have a slip resistant surface to help stabilisation. Best of all they’re lightweight and very portable – perfect for events, work, travel and being on the road. (Can you tell we love this ball!).


Here’s a selection of the key releases,  to get to all the major parts of your body.

TrP and Ball Release

If you’d like to get yourself one of these balls, the smaller MB1 or the very popular grid roller, pop into the clinic where we have the full range in stock.

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Sport Focus: Golfing Injuries

Posted on 8th February 2017 by

Golf is a power sport. Its ultimate aim is to ensure the club head reaches peak velocity at the point of impact with the ball, in an angle and direction that optimises accuracy, in a repeatable and consistent way. Golfers agree this is much easier to say than do.

It is in attempting to reach this gold standard, that many golfers make compensations, due to their own innate or acquired physiological weaknesses. Although the body’s ability to adapt and compensate is excellent up to a point, without detecting and correcting these weaknesses, performance will suffer and pain and injury often occur.

Damage can range from simple muscle and tendon overuse, to traumatic twists and sprains. Some of the more common golfing injuries we successfully treat at goPhysio include the following:

  • Golfer’s and Tennis elbow: An overuse tendon injury affecting the forearm musculature, this is usually a direct result of the excessive forces generated in the extensor or flexor tendons, due to club and grip, swing changes or issues, inadequate warm-up, poor practice habits and the repetitive nature of the golf swing
  • Muscle Tears: Commonly occur within the powerful rotational muscles of the trunk and lower limbs. This injury frequently transpires as a player becomes fatigued towards the end of a round
  • Ligament Sprains: Affect mainly the back, hips, knees and ankles due to the twisting and rotational forces generated when swinging
  • Shoulder Injuries: Commonly affect the rotator cuff musculature, as it works hard to control the arm position throughout the golf swing
  • Back and Injuries: Without correct spinal posture at address and throughout the golf swing, powerful, negative rotational forces are generated within the spine, often leading to long term facet joint and disc injuries with myofascial trigger points and protective muscle spasm

Our approach ensures that we will treat your injury successfully. As well as “hands-on” treatments, we will detect and correct any physiological weaknesses and compensations which may be affecting your golf swing and performance.

We give you the treatment, exercise, education and advice to improve your swing mechanics, accuracy and performance, achieve long-term physical durability and prevent injury relapse.

If you’re suffering with a golf related injury and want to get back to enjoying your golf without pain, give us a call on 023 8025 3317. You can also book an appointment online to see one of our team at our clinic in Chandlers Ford.

 


Common Triathlon Injuries

Posted on 31st January 2017 by

Triathlon is a highly demanding discipline, consisting of swimming, cycling and running. It’s an endurance sport which requires suppleness, agility, flexibility and strength throughout the whole kinetic chain, all of which take their toll on the athlete.

Triathletes commonly train between 10-15 hours per week, so injury is normally due to overuse of the body. Additionally, due to the time expended training and competing, participants tend to get less time to recover or sleep as they fit in intensive training regimes around work and/or home commitments. It is particularly important, therefore, to be in the best of health. Eating a high protein diet, facilitating better recovery and building muscle mass, is a smart way to stay ahead.

Common triathlete injuries

Knee Injuries are very common in triathletes, they can be caused by:

  • The excessive forces generated from poor knee over pedal spindle position when cycling, leading to patello-femoral mal-tracking & patellar tendonopathies.
  • The excessive rotational forces through the knee caused by a poor technique in swimming, causing ligament sprains, cartlidge or meniscal problems.
  • Overuse soft tissue injuries caused by excessive heel strike or flattened foot arches, when running i.e. Achilles tendonopathies, shin pain, ilio-tibial band friction syndrome.

Tendonopathies Achilles tendonopathies are one of the most common tri-athlete injury. The achilles tendon tends to shorten on the bike and when transitioning into running, is over-stretched and over time, it becomes overloaded and injured.

Ligament Sprains Affect mainly knees and ankles, sustained through trauma when falling, twisting or landing awkwardly.

Muscle Tears These commonly occur within the explosive accelerating muscles of the lower limb. They frequently occur at the start of a speed or hill session (with inadequate warm-up) or as a runner becomes fatigued towards the end of a session.

Shoulder Injuries 60% of swimming injuries are related to the shoulder, due to repetitive excessive over-rotation and constant overloading of the joint and muscles. This causes impingement (trapping of the soft tissue against the bone), rotator cuff tendonopathies, sub-acromial bursitis, or muscle imbalance, trigger points or an unstable joint.

Neck and Shoulder Injuries With poor alignment on the bike, over-stretching and reaching can cause a build-up of tension within the neck joints and muscles, causing facet joint stiffness, myofascial trigger points, disc injuries and nerve entrapment.

Back Injuries The lumbar spine is often affected, due to the sustained, unnatural flexed position of the cyclist. Long-term overuse lumbar facet joint and disc conditions often occur, as do chronic muscle imbalances, trigger points and painful protective muscle spasm.

Foot and Ankle Injuries Poor running technique (excessive heel strike) or flattened foot arches, can result in shin pain, achilles tendonopathies, ilio-tibial band friction syndrome and back injuries.

Many of the common triathlon injuries can be prevented through education and body conditioning. Making sure you are aware of injury risks and crucially, taking steps to avoid them is the best course of action. This includes:

  • Warming up effectively
  • Being aware of any personal ‘risk’ areas i.e. tightness, weakness, imbalances – and more importantly dressing these
  • Using the right equipment, set up in the best way for you
  • Working on your technique
  • Balancing training with rest and recovery
  • Mixing up your training with other activities, such as Pilates
  • Not ignoring any niggling injuries that may build up

If you suffer with an acute injury or have developed an overuse injury, get in touch with us at goPhysio. Our team of Physio’s are well equipped to help you overcome your injury and build long term, physical durability to help stop you suffering an injury again – getting the best enjoyment from your triathlon!

Read more on cycling injuries, running injuries and runners knee.