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Runners! When injury strikes, what do you do? We’d like to find out more!

Posted on 27th April 2018 by

Running project goPhysio

TAKE THE SURVEY HERE!

We work with hundreds of runners, from couch to 5k enthusiasts just starting out their running journey to ultra marathon runners. We more often than not see them to help, when pain or injury has impacted on what they love to do – run! However, we know that so many runners who are injured seek other sources of help to get them back running after an injury.

Are you a runner who’s been injured in the last year or so? If so, goPhysio are interested to hear more about your experiences and what matters most to you. Many runners ask a fellow runner for injury advice, take a ‘wait and see approach’ or do their own research online with mixed results. goPhysio are interested in finding out more about your frustrations and successes when an injury gets in the way of your love of running.

So, if you have 5 minutes to spare, please click on this link to tell us more about your experiences.

Many thanks.

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goRUN10 – New Running Training Programme to get you to 10k

Posted on 26th March 2018 by

goRun10 10 Running ProgrammeNew Training Programme to get you to 10k!

We are delighted to be teaming up with Mike Chambers, from Next Step Running, to offer you a fully supported run coaching programme, to get you beyond 5k!

With a new Eastleigh 10k date, this is the perfect chance to refocus and get the expert support and guidance to run 10k!

Achieve your goals! Learn lifelong running skills!

Book your place online here! 


What does the programme include?

This unique programme is the perfect combination of a practical running programme with an experienced, qualified coach alongside an informative schedule of educational and practical sessions, structured to support your long term running journey.

The programme will run on a Wednesday evening from 6.30 – 8pm.

Week 1, 11the April –  Introduction to the running programme & getting to know you. This will include what to expect from the programme, outline of the training plan and a gauge of where you all are, so that the programme can be tailored accordingly. We will cover some key important issues in running, so that you can get the most from the programme and maintain lifelong love of running!

Weeks 2 – 9, 25th April – 13th June – These weekly sessions will include a 1 hour supervised run, including not only running but drills, technique, strength and conditioning work and more. There will also be a 30minute practical or educational workshop, covering a different topic each week. These sessions will include the following:

  • Warm up and cool down – dynamic stretching vs static stretching – why & how.
  • 10k Training – key components – interval training, threshold & tempo runs, hills, the long run and running easy.
  • Tapering and last week preparation.
  • Strength training for runners.
  • Foam rolling for runners.
  • Race day – hydration & fuelling, pacing for 10k, post race recovery
  • Pilates for runners.
  • Managing load & capacity, making sure you avoid injury.

By adding this unique, educational element, to your running programme, you will benefit from being able to ‘run better’ – avoiding injuries, achieving your goals and loving your running!

Why would I benefit from a supported running coach programme?

With access to so many online training plans, running apps, free running groups and with running training programmes in every magazine, Running Coaching can be seen as a luxury only needed for elite level athletes. Surely everyone can run anyway? It’s just a matter of how fast and how far! You just need a pair of trainers!

But think again! Recreational runners arguably benefit more from a structured running programme with a qualified, experienced Running Coach than those club level racing snakes!

Too many runners do the same run several times a week, run too hard too often, plateau and / or pick up an injury. These issues can really hamper enjoyment of running and progress and often cause people to give up on running. With the right education, guidance and support, we can help you avoid this.

Having a structured programme with a Coach will motivate you, challenge you when they think you can give more, but more often than not recognise when you need to back off and take it easy!  A Coach will structure your week so you include all the key components to make you a fitter, stronger and faster runner.

How much is the programme?

The 9 week programme costs £79. This will include:

  • Week 1 introductory session
  • Bespoke 8 week training programme based on 3 sessions per week
    • 8 x 1.5 hour weekly sessions with the Running Coach & goPhysio
    • 2 x homework sessions to do with the rest of your group or on your own in between
  • Support on creating more variety in your running, including hill sessions,interval training and strength & conditioning work, with lots of support and tips to help you build strength and speed throughout the sessions
  • Email support throughout the programme
  • 10% off at goPhysio for Physiotherapy, Sports Therapy or Sports Massage, should you need it

Who is this for?

This programme is suitable for those who are able to run at least 5k. Maybe you’re a Parkrun regular but aren’t sure how to get to the next level. You may have signed up to the Eastleigh 10k but heaved a sigh of relief when it got postponed as you weren’t ready. Maybe you’ve run comfortably on your own but now want some extra support in a group environment. Or it might be you’ve recently returned to running from an injury and want to make sure you are armed with the right skills and knowledge so you don’t get injured again?

Places are limited, please book your place here or to find out more or if you have any questions, email fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk

 

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Top 10K Recovery Tips from goPhysio

Posted on 16th March 2018 by

Well done! You’ve completed your 10k race! If you’re a 10k regular, you may have learnt the bast way to tackle post race recovery. But for some, it may be your first 10k event. What you do after an event can really help or hinder your recovery and set you on the right path for continuing your running journey!

Not sure what is best to do to help your recovery. Well don’t worry, here are goPhysio’s top tips for your recovery:

  1. Cool Down – you cross the finish line and the last thing you want to do is keep moving, but a gentle jog or walk will help to steadily slow down your heart rate and allow the build up of waste products in the muscles to be flushed out.
  2. Hydration – Keeping hydrated is essential to allow the muscle to stay elastic and malleable; after all your muscle are made up of up to 70% water.
  3. Refuel – within 30 mins of your race it is important to refuel with a small meal high in carbohydrates and protein. This will help to prevent the onset of muscle soreness as this is the optimal time that the body will use the carbohydrates to rebuild glycogen stores.
  4. Rest– after you have celebrated running your 1st,5th,15th 10km race, get an early night. Sleep is when our body heals, so it is important to give your body the best chance of healing those sore muscles and giving you the best recovery.
  5. Active Recovery – The day after your 10k race try to get your body moving, go for a walk, swim, cycle or even a light jog. This will get you heart pumping increasing circulation around the body continuing to flush out any waste products (lactic acid).
  6. Massage – Book yourself a sports massage. You have trained hard and reached your goal of running the 10km so why not treat yourself to a recovery massage the day after the race. This will help relax those tight muscles, increase the blood flow to the muscle and help prevent DOMS. Don’t forget to take advantage of our race day offers, you can get 20% off your sports massage until 30th April.
  7. Listen to your body – if your feeling sore a day or two after your run then try to listen to your body and what it needs. Take your time to get back into your running routine.
  8. Celebrate – you’ve done it, what a great achievement! Be proud of yourself and celebrate what you’ve achieved. Whether it’s your first 10k or one of many, well done from us all at goPhysio!

How might orthotics help me?

Posted on 10th March 2018 by

Orthotics are prescribed and worn for a variety of reasons. They are also known as insoles, shoe inserts or orthoses.

The most common reasons orthotics are recommended are:

  • Arch and heel pain (Plantar Fasciitis)
  • Lower leg tendonitis (Achilles tendonitis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction)
  • Shin splints
  • Knee pain, such as chondromalacia patellae, iliotibial band syndrome (Runners knee)
  • Leg length discrepancy
  • Low back pain

Orthotics work by improving foot efficiency, lower limb alignment, therefore reducing stress on the problem area resulting in pain relief.

Although some people adapt to orthotics very quickly, you should gradually adjust to them by wearing them for a few hours more each day. You should avoid using them for extended activity, including sports, until you feel fully comfortable.

They should be comfortable and used whenever you are doing the activity that would normally aggravate your condition. If you need orthotics, they can improve your overall comfort in your lower limbs and feet.

We are able tosses whether you’d benefit from orthotics by combining our knowledge & expertise of injury and how the foot and ankle works with a dynamic computerised foot scan. Following this we can make appropriate recommendations based on your individual case and circumstances.

Read More

What are orthotics?

Overuse injuries

Top 5 Running Injuries and How To Manage Them

 

 


Eastleigh 10k – 10 day countdown with Next Step Running & goPhysio

Posted on 9th March 2018 by

After a somewhat unexpected and disruptive week of snow, it has been nice to see a return to the normality of early spring…lovely to see the sun and of course rain and near impossible to do a run without thinking you have too many / too few layers on!

The run up to the Eastleigh 10k always includes a daily weather watch and such is our British weather in March there is no guessing what the weather will be on the day. Hint of summer sun…or return to biting winds and rain?? We will see.

Last night, we were joined by Running Coach, Mike Chambers from Next Step Running and 13 keen runners who have signed up for the 2018 installment of the ever growing and popular Eastleigh 10k road race, to talk through their last 10 days preparation…and yes this included the weather!

Mike has kindly written this guest blog post for us.

The evening began with introductions with a mixed audience of first time 10k runners through to the more experienced runners in the hunt for a new PB. But what unites all us runners is the thirst for information to improve your running and the mind games that go on in your head in those final few days.

We talked through dealing with nerves, trying to get the whole thing in some perspective compared with the really important things in our lives….and could we all run a little bit more like Eluid Kipchoge…not as fast but at least with a smile on our face!

Tapering

One of the hot topics of debate for this evening (and every evening you spend with a group of runners) was focused on the last week of training and tapering before a key race. The greatest fear among many new runners is getting to the start line tired from training in the last week, but in my experience, backing off too much is more likely to leave you feeling flat come the big day. Our bodies crave routine, so just take out some of the volume (30%), just tweak the intensity down a notch and keep the same number of running days….and don’t go to Ikea the day before race day! Easy runs with ‘race pace’ strides (4 or 5 x 30 second bursts) or even ‘pick up’ miles at the end on your easy runs is a simple taper for new runners over a 10k distance. This will keep your body in tune with the pace needed on the day, without digging too deep.

Food

And of course we talked about food! In a world of super foods and diet programmes and get fit quick solutions, I like to keep things simple. As long as you are eating a sensible balanced diet, keep to it, no major changes and no major carb load! The small taper in your training in the last week will act as a carb load if you maintain your usual diet. Yes, to a carb based meal the night before, but more importantly, graze through Saturday with little and often approach to snacks. And we tried to dispel myths and one claim on the night that new research suggested you don’t need any carbs at all!

Hydration

Make sure your body is hydrated through those last few days, and don’t go chugging water Sunday morning…you will feel heavy…and be in a long queue for the toilet. Keep up some electrolyte in take through a sports drink on the day. Gels – realistically unless running over 70-80 minutes for the 10k, you wont need fueling during the race, your body will have all the glycogen stores you need to fire you to the finish.

Race Day Prep

Most runners I know are creatures of habit and getting the timetable right on the day is critical to avoid a full meltdown! This works best by working backwards from the race start time, breakfast around 2 hours before this. Thinking through travel and parking on the day. Kit laid out day before (OK, I will be honest, I have laid my kit out at least 3 days before!!). Race number pinned on and check and double check have everything you need…..remember the weather…this could be vest or t shirt, but equally we may be looking at base layer, hat and gloves. A layer to keep on to the very last minute also worth having.

Race day is about trusting in your training and committing to what you set out to do, be it just get round or chasing that PB. Visualise achieving your goal, crossing the line and getting the medal and t-shirt will help you to make that your reality.

Next Step Running LogoSo, to all of you doing your first 10k, chasing a new PB or whatever your motivation for getting out there on race day, smile, commit to your pace and the very best of luck.

Mike Chambers, Running Coach

Next Step Running 

 


Alternatives To Foam Rolling

Posted on 7th March 2018 by

Foam rolling or self myo-fascial release, is a great addition to your exercise schedule. It’s a fantastic way to help your body ward of injuries. But there are a number of alternatives to the traditional foam roller, and here’s a few we love!

MB1 Trigger Point Massage Ball 

MB1 MB5 Trigger Point Roller Ball
A great alternative to a foam roller is the MB1 or MB5 ball
  • Great for targeting smaller areas such as feet, calves, hip flexors, piriformis, pecs, shoulders, forearms and the back of the neck.
  • The foam surface allows it to ‘grip’ the areas that need attention whilst the different densities of foam allow it to target deep muscles whilst remaining comfortable.
  • Extremely convenient for travel and portability.
  • Swap the foam roller out for this small, effective myofascial tool!

MB5 Trigger Point Massage Ball

  • This larger massage ball can be applied to muscles in a very similar way to that of a foam roller.
  • Target large muscle groups such as quadriceps, glutes, hip flexors, lats, QL, pecs and the upper back.
  • The layered construction offers varying levels of pressure, making sure you’re hitting the right spots but remaining in a comfortable zone.
TrP Foot roller
Nano Foot Roller

Nano Foot Roller

  • Excellent at relieving tension throughout the forearms or the bottom of the foot, where the size of a foam roller would produce less effective results.
  • The small, portable tool will help channel blood to the right areas and get rid of those aches and pains, as well as give you the ability to treat minor injuries such as plantar fasciitis.
  • Also very useful for acute pain along the bottom of the foot; a frozen water bottle. You get the hardness of a roller with the pain relieving effects of ice.

Massage Stick

  • Great if you don’t enjoy lying on the ground or having to change positions with a foam roller.
  • This massage still allows you to roll large muscle groups with varying degrees of pressure.
  • Applied most frequently to the lower limb, this massage stick is both highly effective and easily transported.
Spikey ball
Spiky balls

Spiky Ball 

  • Very similar to the Trigger Point massage ball, these spiky balls allow for a diverse range of rolling techniques whilst also offering a larger amount of tactile feedback (which helps to wake muscles up).
  • They come in a range of sizes and are a cost effective way to achieve the desired results (although may not last quite as long assume of the more hard wearing alternatives).
  • Apply to the same small areas such as the foot, calves, hip flexors, piriformis, pecs, shoulders, forearms and the back of the neck.

Roller Ball

  • This smooth roller ball features a hand-held base which allows the user to accurately target painful areas and perform soft tissue release with a self-prescribed amount of pressure.

    massage roller
    Omni Massager Rollers
  • Excellent for targeting hard-to-reach spots with a foam roller, this massager can be used on the peroneals, tibalias anterior, quadriceps, hip flexors, groin, glutes, piriformis, lower back muscles, pecs, shoulders, neck and arms.

MB 2 Trigger Point Massage Ball

  • This adjustable massage ball is perfect for finding those sore spots in the neck and back. Use this ball to help with posture and back mobility.
  • When closed the ball targets the muscles attaching directly to the spine. When open it will target the larger muscles of the back.
  • Very small, light and extremely portable.
MB2 Trigger point roller
MB2 Trigger Point Roller

Read more about the art of foam rolling.


We sell a range of these products from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, Hampshire. So if you want to find out more or have a demo, pop in and have a chat!

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Runners – We Need Your Help!

Posted on 27th February 2018 by

We are trying to find out more about what injured runners do to get back to pain-free running, and would love to hear from you! If you’re interested in helping us out, please take a few moments to answer a couple of questions by clicking here. Many thanks.

The Injured Runner Project

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Change just 1 thing to boost your running performance

Posted on 4th February 2018 by

Learn from the expert’s – here’s 5 great short cuts to rapidly improving your running performance, it’s not cheating honest! Just focus on 1 and see if it helps. From our Clinical Director, Paul.

1. The HOKA Difference: I regularly and happily recommend HOKA trainers to all my patients that require improved shock absorption and reduced tissue loading when running. They involve marshmallow, rocking chair and bucket seat technology!

To me, a clinician, they’re a unique mash up of styles, designed to simply and easily improve your shock absorption, comfort, running gait and foot stability. They are designed with only a 4mm rise from heel-to- toe, with a slight rocker shaped sole, to help with midfoot strike and smooth propulsion. Think ‘barefoot running’ style with comfy shock absorbent trainers on. The best of both world’s! So get down to your local running store and test drive a pair today. Read more about Hoka’s here. You can read more about the importance of running footwear here.

You’ll feel 10 years younger & 20kg lighter – I know I did!

2. Heel to Buttocks: Essentially it’s about improving the efficiency of your running style, by spending as much of your energy as possible in the propulsion phase. Avoiding long strides in-front of your body and the increased ground reaction forces, in this inefficient deceleration phase of running.

It’s about switching on your large propulsion muscles (gluteals and hamstring) at the end of your long levers (legs) and pushing off optimally through your big toe. It’s easier done, then you may think, just think of the cue “heel to buttocks”. So as you jog along bring your heels up towards your buttocks, and lean your trunk forwards, be prepared to getting faster as you go!

3. Pump with the arms & the legs will follow: To improve speed for that sprint finish, if you pump fast with your arms, your legs will automatically move faster. It’s the way we’re neurologically wired for reciprocal movement and the pro’s have been using it for years.

4. Sleep Better: Ensure you get approx at least 7-8 hours of sleep each night especially in the midst of a running training programme, to allow your body to recover and achieve the full benefits of training. Walker (2017), in his book ‘Why we sleep’ explains that there is a significant increase in the risk of injury with a lack of sleep.

There is no better insurance policy to mitigate the risk of injury than sleep!

Walker also explains that If your consistently not getting adequate sleep, less than 6 hour per night, you will not gain the full benefits from a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise and good nutrition. He concludes that “Sleep is one of the most sophisticated, potent and powerful – not to mention legal – performance enhancer’s everyone should be using fully”. So do yourself a favour a ensure you get – 8 hours of sleep each night!. Read more about the ‘Magic Elixir’ of sleep for runners here.

5. Maintain a Healthy Weight: A shortcut to making the most of what you’ve got is to maintain a healthy weight. For middle aged, social, fun runners it is by far the biggest contributor to easily increasing speed, distance, enjoyment whilst reducing the risk of injury. An average rule is that for every 2-3 kg lost you’ll easily improve your mile pace by a minute.


Sleep: The Magic Elixir for Runners

Posted on 19th January 2018 by

I’ve just recently read a great book, titled Why We Sleep, by the neuroscientist, Matthew Waker. Why we sleep

I wanted to share a summary of the relevant sections, which I thought would be enlightening and useful for you keen, active, health conscious runners. If it sparks your interest, I would thoroughly recommend getting hold of a copy to read it in full. It really is fascinating!

Walker explains that:

“Sleep is one of the most important aspects of life, health and longevity and yet it is increasingly neglected in 21st century society”

For the active runner, adequate sleep is crucial to help in learning new motor skills, improving athletic performance and mitigating injury risk!

In the book, Walker explains that the term ‘muscle memory’ is a misnomer, muscles have no such memory, and that in fact ‘muscle memory’ is really ‘brain memory’. As humans, we learn new motor skills and movement routines through practice. For a runner it could be working on running technique, training or strengthening muscles in the gym, which can help us better execute a skilled memory routine (running). But the routine itself – the memory programme resides firmly and exclusively within the brain.

Research over the past 20 years has unequivocally demonstrated that after practicing any motor skill, your brain will continue to improve skill memories in the absence of further practice after a full night sleep. Walker concludes that in fact

“Practice does not make perfect, it is practice followed by a nights sleep that leads to perfection”

Sleep helps the brain automate the movement routines – helping them become second nature and effortless – precisely the goal of many sports coaches when perfecting the skills of their athletes.

The 100-metre sprinter superstar Usain Bolt has, on many occasions taken naps in the hours before breaking the world record and before Olympic finals in which he won gold. The author’s studies support this wisdom: day time naps that contain sufficient numbers of sleep spindles also offer significant motor skill memory improvement, together with a restoring benefit on perceived energy and reduced muscle fatigue.

“Sleep is one of the most sophisticated, potent and powerful – not to mention legal – performance enhancer’s everyone should be using fully”

The book’s findings are backed up with more than 750 scientific studies that have investigated the relationship between sleep and human performance. Anything less than 8 hours of sleep a night and especially less than 6 hours a night and the following can be experienced:

  • Time to physical exhaustion drops by 10 to 30%
  • Aerobic output is significantly reduced
  • Similar impairments are observed in power output, measured by limb extension force & vertical jump height
  • Decrease in peak and sustained muscle strength.
  • Marked impairments in cardio-vascular, metabolic and respiratory capabilities linked to a decrease in the amount of air the lungs can expire
  • The ability of the body to cool itself during physical exertion through sweating, a critical part of peak performance, is impaired

Injury Risk 

There is also a significant increase in the risk of injury with a lack of sleep.

“There is no better insurance policy to mitigate the risk of injury than sleep!”

Described in a research study of competitive young athlete’s in 2014, Walker explains that a chronic lack of sleep across a season predicted a massively higher risk of injury, as illustrated on the graph below.

 

Sleep and injury risk
Sleep after sporting performance is just as crucial for recovery. The book states that

“Post performance sleep accelerates physical recovery from common inflammation, stimulates muscle repair, and helps restock cellular energy in the form of glucose and glycogen”

What does all this mean for the local fun runner?

Regardless of running ability, sleep is equally important for anyone who is physically active. Until recently the experts thought that adequate sleep, good nutrition and exercise were the 3 fundamentals on which to live a healthy life.

However, through a large body of research over the last 20 years, Walker has highlighted that adequate sleep is the foundation on which being healthy and exercising effectively is built upon.

In other words….without adequate sleep you will not gain the full potential benefits of a healthy diet and regular exercise. So, you should be aiming for between 7-8 hours of sleep each night, especially in the midst of a running training programme, to allow your body to recover and achieve the full benefits of training.

For further information, please read Why We Sleep, by Mathew Walker

The Injured Runner Project
We are trying to find out more about what injured runners do to get back to pain-free running, and would love to hear from you! If you’re interested in helping us out, please take a few moments to answer a couple of questions by clicking on this image. Many thanks.

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Runners – The Importance of Footwear and getting it right!

Posted on 15th January 2018 by

For a runner, running footwear is the most important piece of kit you will have in your running career (well – joint-most important next to a good Sports Bra for you ladies!). You will fight together through tarmac and forest paths, from quick mid-week runs to the long, slow Sunday ones. Training and racing side by side – so, with the Hendy Eastleigh 10km around the corner, you need to a pair of shoes you’re going to get on with!

Running Footwear has evolved so much in the last decade, it would be naïve to attempt to choose your perfect shoe alone. There are so many variables such as cushioning, stability, heel offsets and durability across well over 20 brands, who have up 30 shoes each on the market. That’s a lot of shoes!!

So, as your Official Health Partner of the Hendy Eastleigh 10km 2018, we thought to give you 5 points to find your match made in heaven:

  1. Support your local shop. Don’t buy online – you can’t get fitted properly over a computer- not yet at least! Go in and talk to someone one-to-one and get a gait analysis done. A gait analysis helps identify any abnormalities in your running style and whether it can be corrected with a particular set of shoes. The main movement they will look out for is the term ‘pronation’ and other elements such as heel striking and lateral/medial rotation of the hip. From this information, they will be able to suggest the best solution for you.
  2. Be open minded – don’t judge a shoe by its colour or brand. Always try what the shop recommends and get the shoe which feels most comfortable. Not the one which matches your new sports top! A pretty pair of shoes won’t hide the pain on your face half way round 10km!!
  3. Be transparent! Talk to them openly about your current aches and pains, and also what you like/don’t like about each of the shoes they suggest. That kind of feedback maybe the different between getting a good shoe and the perfect shoe for you!
  4. Don’t be too limited on price. For a good pair of running shoes, you’ll be looking at spending around £110 for a decent pair. It’s an investment for sure, but the shoes will last you long time and can offset a lot injuries and pain in the long run – no pun intended! They will last ~450 miles for the higher mileage shoes before you need to consider replacing them. So for someone doing 10 miles a week, that’s about a year!
  5. Don’t leave it too late! Give it at least three weeks before the race. Trust me from experience – it will make you re-evaluate everything you thought you knew about blisters otherwise! Break the shoe in properly with about 5 x 5km runs. And then, if you have any issues, just talk to them. It does happen and they will usually be keen to rectify the problem. But be wary, most guarantees only last a month!

Good luck to all who are doing the Hendy Eastleigh 10km! Fingers crossed for good weather and we will see you there as your Official Health Partner for the day!

Cameron Knapp

goPhysio – Sports Massage Therapist

Read More 

How to warn up for running

Top tips for injured runners

Runners – how to maximise your training time