Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Runners – The Importance of Footwear and getting it right!

Posted on 15th January 2018 by

For a runner, running footwear is the most important piece of kit you will have in your running career (well – joint-most important next to a good Sports Bra for you ladies!). You will fight together through tarmac and forest paths, from quick mid-week runs to the long, slow Sunday ones. Training and racing side by side – so, with the Hendy Eastleigh 10km around the corner, you need to a pair of shoes you’re going to get on with!

Running Footwear has evolved so much in the last decade, it would be naïve to attempt to choose your perfect shoe alone. There are so many variables such as cushioning, stability, heel offsets and durability across well over 20 brands, who have up 30 shoes each on the market. That’s a lot of shoes!!

So, as your Official Health Partner of the Hendy Eastleigh 10km 2018, we thought to give you 5 points to find your match made in heaven:

  1. Support your local shop. Don’t buy online – you can’t get fitted properly over a computer- not yet at least! Go in and talk to someone one-to-one and get a gait analysis done. A gait analysis helps identify any abnormalities in your running style and whether it can be corrected with a particular set of shoes. The main movement they will look out for is the term ‘pronation’ and other elements such as heel striking and lateral/medial rotation of the hip. From this information, they will be able to suggest the best solution for you.
  2. Be open minded – don’t judge a shoe by its colour or brand. Always try what the shop recommends and get the shoe which feels most comfortable. Not the one which matches your new sports top! A pretty pair of shoes won’t hide the pain on your face half way round 10km!!
  3. Be transparent! Talk to them openly about your current aches and pains, and also what you like/don’t like about each of the shoes they suggest. That kind of feedback maybe the different between getting a good shoe and the perfect shoe for you!
  4. Don’t be too limited on price. For a good pair of running shoes, you’ll be looking at spending around £110 for a decent pair. It’s an investment for sure, but the shoes will last you long time and can offset a lot injuries and pain in the long run – no pun intended! They will last ~450 miles for the higher mileage shoes before you need to consider replacing them. So for someone doing 10 miles a week, that’s about a year!
  5. Don’t leave it too late! Give it at least three weeks before the race. Trust me from experience – it will make you re-evaluate everything you thought you knew about blisters otherwise! Break the shoe in properly with about 5 x 5km runs. And then, if you have any issues, just talk to them. It does happen and they will usually be keen to rectify the problem. But be wary, most guarantees only last a month!

Good luck to all who are doing the Hendy Eastleigh 10km! Fingers crossed for good weather and we will see you there as your Official Health Partner for the day!

Cameron Knapp

goPhysio – Sports Massage Therapist

Read More 

How to warn up for running

Top tips for injured runners

Runners – how to maximise your training time


How to Foam Roll – The Art of Self-Myofascial Release

Posted on 12th January 2018 by

Here’s a quick, no nonsense guide for runners to help improve your warm-up, performance and prevent injury with some simple foam rolling! It’s all about the fascia!

What is fascia?

Firstly, fascia is a dense connective tissue that surrounds every muscle, joint and organ in the body.

There are 3 types of fascia; superficial, deep and visceral.

  • Superficial fascia lies just beneath the skin.
  • Deep fascia penetrates and surrounds muscle tissue.
  • Visceral fascia helps keep vital organs in place.

Everything in the body is connected through fascia, but some areas are more connected than others, forming thickened sheaths and bands of fascia. These are bundled together, inseparable from the muscle tissue (myo) and it’s accompanying web of connective tissue (fascia), forming a 3D myo-fascial web throughout the body. Think of a 3D spider’s web in the shape of your body & you’re getting close!

When working optimally, this myo-fascial web helps provide support, stability, movement dynamics, force transmission and optimises sporting performance.

Why should runners foam roll?

Trigger Point Grid Foam Roller Foam rolling
We like the Grid Rollers from Trigger Point Therapy
  • For warm-up pre running, as it’s far more effective that static stretching (5)
  • To increase nutrient-rich blood flow to muscles that need it.
  • To improve the mobility and flexibility of muscles and joints (4,6,7).
  • To increase athletic performance (8,9).
  • To recover from exercise faster (1,2,3).
  • To reduce inflammation and remove toxins/chemical waste products.
  • Longer term, to break down adhesions in muscle and connective tissue.
  • You can also successfully self-treat minor injuries such as muscle strains and trigger points.

When should runners foam roll? 

  •  MB1 MB5 Trigger Point Roller Ball
    A great alternative to a foam roller is the MB1 or MB5 ball

    Before exercise: when paired with a dynamic warm up to increase blood flow to areas that may be lacking it.

  • After exercise: used within a cool-down procedure to flush out blood that has pooled in working muscles and to allow fresh nutrients and oxygen in to kick start the recovery process.

Rolling for only a few minutes can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your training session. So, if you’re stuck for time, pre-exercise rolling would provide most benefit.

How to foam roll

Remember this easy guide and apply it to each muscle group that you’re working on.

  • 4 linear rolls (to search the muscle for areas of tightness, we call these ‘hot spots’).
  • 30 second holds on each hot spot.
  • 4 joint movements (to move the muscle underneath the roller).
  1. Underside of the foot (plantar fascia)

TrP Foot roller Foam rolling

  • Place the roller under the sole of the foot.
  • Apply pressure and roll slowly towards the heel and back to the sole of the foot, 4 times.
  • Hold pressure on any hot spots you may find.
  • Once this hot spot starts to reduce, maintain pressure and add in movement of the toes by flexing and extending them all 4 times.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Calves (gastrocnemius and soleus)TrP Calf Roller
  • Zone A = achilles to mid-calf.
  • Zone B = mid-calf to just below the knee.
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by sitting on the floor with the roller on your Achilles tendon.
  • Place your hands behind you and the other leg on top to add pressure.
  • Roll up and down searching for hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Thighs (quadriceps)
  • Zone A = front of the hip to mid-thigh.
  • Zone B = mid-thigh to just above the knee. TrP Quads
  • Roll zone A, followed by zone B.
  • Begin by lying on your front with the roller at the front of your hip just below the bone.
  • Support yourself with your elbows out in front and the other leg bent up to the side.
  • Roll up and down in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • You can also ‘span’ the muscle by turning your foot inwards and outwards whilst maintaining pressure on a hot spot.
  • Now, once on a hot spot, bend and straighten the knee 4 times.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times before moving on to zone B.
  1. Buttock (gluteals and piriformis)
  • Begin by sitting on the roller with your hands behind you for support.
  • Shift your weight onto one side as you bring that leg up and cross it over the other.
  • Aim to have the roller ‘in your back pocket’.TrP Glutes Foam Rolling
  • Roll along the length of your glute in search of hot spots. If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat the process 3-4 times.
  1. Upper back (paraspinals, rhomboids, trapezius)
  • Lay on your back with the roller just below the shoulder blades.
  • Place your arms behind your head or cross them in front of your chest.TrP Upper Back Foam Rolling
  • Lift your hips off the floor and use your legs to roll up and down the spine.
  • Carefully extend your back over the roller.
  • Add in side bends to target various muscle groups.
  • Again, if any hot spots are identified, hold this pressure for 30 seconds before moving on.
  1. Chest (pectoralis major/minor)
  • Lay on your front and place the roller (or trigger point ball) just inside the shoulder joint, on the pectoralis tendon. Pec TrP
  • With the arm above the head roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in arm movements to manipulate the soft tissue underneath the roller. 4 straight-arm scoops should do it.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.
  1. Latissimus Dorsi
  • Lay on your side with one arm above your head for support.
  • Place the roller at a 45° angle just underneath your armpit.Lat Dorsi TrP
  • Shift your weight to roll up and down in search of hot spots.
  • If any are found, hold this pressure for 30 seconds.
  • Add in straight arm movements to release the tissues further, 4 movements followed by 4 rolls.
  • Repeat this process 3-4 times.

References

  1. Pearcey GP, Bradbury-Squires DJ, Kawamoto J, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG, Button DC. Foam rolling for delayed-onset muscle soreness and recovery of dynamic performance measures. J Athl Train. 2015;50:5–13.
  2. Macdonald et al. (2014) Macdonald GZ, Button DC, Drinkwater EJ, Behm DG. Foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense bout of physical activity. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2014;46(1):131–142.
  3. Rey E, Padron-Cabo A, Costa PB, Barcala-Furelos R. The effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool in professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res. 2017;
  4. Bushell JE, Dawson SM, Webster MM. Clinical relevance of foam rolling on hip extension angle in a functional lunge position. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29:2397–403.
  5. Su H, Chang NJ, Wu WL, Guo LY, Chu IH. Acute effects of foam rolling, static stretching, and dynamic stretching during warm-ups on muscular flexibility and strength in young adults. J Sport Rehabil. 2016; 1-24.
  6. Kelly S., Beardsley C. (2016) Specific and cross-over effects of foam rolling on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy 11(4), 544-551.
  7. Macdonald GZ, Penney M, Mullaley ME, Cuconato AL, Drake CD, Behm DG, Button DC. An acute bout of self-myofascial release increases range of motion without a subsequent decrease in muscle activation or force. J Strength Cond Res. 2013;27:812–821.
  8. Peacock CA, Krein DD, Silver TA, Sanders GJ, von Carlowitz KPA. An acute bout of self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling improves performance testing. Int J Exerc Sci. 2014;7:202-211
  9. Monteiro et al. Acute effects of different self-massage volumes on the FMS overhead deep squat performance. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017; 12(1): 94-104.
  10. Monteiro ER Correa Neto VG. Effect of different foam rolling volumes on knee extension fatigue. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2016;11(7):1076‐1081.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Warming Up For Running – “Do I really need to?”

Posted on 8th January 2018 by

So, you’re ready for your next run. But before you set off, let’s consider the importance of a proper warm up.

If you’re an early morning runner and you’ve been led in bed all night, you’ll need to loosen up. Likewise, if you’ve been sat at work all day, you’ll need to prepare those joints and muscles for the physical activity that you’re about to put them through. Even if you have a physical job, getting yourself ready to run will not only improve your running performance, but it will help keep you free from injuries and increase your recovery rate.

So, warming up for a run is definitely important! But what’s the best way to warm up? 

Foam rolling

Love it or hate it, using a foam roller correctly has been proven to improve performance (1,2) and it’s a great way to prepare your muscles for running. From loosening up fascial adhesions to improving circulation, myofascial release with foam rolling is quick and effective and shouldn’t be left out of any warm up routine.

Using a foam roller (or a ball), stick to these six areas for the best whole-body release:

  1. Feet
  2. Calves
  3. Quadriceps
  4. Tensor fascia lata/TFL (hip flexor at the front of your hip)
  5. Lats (run from your armpit down the side of your body)
  6. Pectoral (chest).

Spending 60-90 seconds rolling each area will improve blood flow, release tension and will help identify any sore areas that may need some extra attention. If you’re not sure exactly what to do with your from roller or would like to learn how to use it effectively, why not some along to one of our foam roller workshops.

Mobility

How healthy are your joints? Simply moving a joint through its full range of motion will increase lubrication, open capillaries, improve circulation and facilitate coordination. Focus on your ankles, knees, hips and lower back. Here are some simple mobility exercises that you might do as part of your warm up.

Ankles: circle in each direction. Point the toes and bring them back towards the shins.

Knees: standing heel kicks to facilitate bending and extending the knees.

Hips: rotate one leg at a time in outward circles, before changing direction. Try to keep the circles as big as possible, as to challenge the full range of motion at the joint. Hold on to something if you’re balance isn’t great.

Lower back: laying on your back, bring both knees to your chest, squeeze and relax. Also try taking your right leg over to the left side with a bent knee to encourage rotation. Repeat on the other side.

Stretching 

Perform a few dynamic stretches after your mobility work. Dynamic means that you are stretching through moment (not holding a stretch).

Great examples of dynamic stretches include:

  • Forward lunge with a torso rotation.
  • Forward lunge with a torso side bend.
  • Bringing alternate knees to the chest and squeezing.
  • Alternating high kicks with a (fairly) straight leg.
  • Hamstring stretches with an arm scoop whilst gently walking forwards.

Try to avoid static stretching before physical activity. Research has shown that it can in fact be detrimental to athletic performance (3,4,5).

Muscle activation

Getting the right muscles firing before your run can help to maintain balance, symmetry and prevent injuries from occurring.

These exercises are fab for activating the muscles you need for running:

  • Calves: heels raises, skipping.
  • Quadriceps: lunges, bodyweight squats, tuck jumps.
  • Hamstrings: heel kicks.
  • Glutes: crab walks, side-to-side shuffles, or backwards shuttle runs.

Running backwards is a great way of activating those big gluteal muscles which continue to work when you turn around and run forwards (just make sure you’re in a hazard-free environment to prevent any unwanted falls).

Having your glutes activated will stabilise your hips, you’ll have greater propulsion when pushing off and your knees will be less inclined to fall in every time you plant your front foot. Not only will this make you a more efficient runner, but it will help prevent hip, knee and ankle overuse injuries from occurring.

So, here’s a summary for a runner’s guide to a quick, efficient warm up:

  • Foam Rolling – Quick six; feet, calves, quadriceps, TFL, lats and pecs.
    60-90 seconds on each, then move on.
  • Mobility Work – Move each joint through its full range of motion. Include ankles, knees, hips, lower back.
  • Dynamic Stretches – Active stretching with movement.
  • Muscle Activation – Calves, quadriceps, hamstrings and glutes.
  • Backwards running will help with your forward running.

References

  1. Peacock CA, Krein DD, Silver TA, Sanders GJ, von Carlowitz KPA. An acute bout of self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling improves performance testing. Int J Exerc Sci. 2014;7:202-211.
  2. Monteiro et al. Acute effects of different self-massage volumes on the FMS overhead deep squat performance. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017; 12(1): 94-104.
  3. Chatzopoulos D., Galazoulas C., Patikas D., Kotzamanidis C. (2014) Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 13(2), 403-409.
  4. Lowery RP et al. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance. J Strength Cont Res. 2014; 28(1): 161-7.
  5. Costa PB, Ryan ED, Herda TJ, Walter AA, Defreitas JM, Stout JR, Cramer JT. Acute effects of static stretching on peak torque and the hamstrings-to-quadriceps conventional and functional ratios. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013;23:38–45.

Runners – How To Avoid Injuries

Posted on 4th January 2018 by

No one wants an injury, particularly runners. Not being able to run because of an injury is highly frustrating. The good news is, so many running injuries can be avoided very easily.

Sports Therapist, Tom, shares some top ways of helping to prevent an injury if you’re a runner.

Warm Up Effectively

A solid warm up should consist of foam rolling (which can improve performance), mobility work to maximise joint health and longevity, dynamic stretching and muscle activation to fire up the key players in running (calves, quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes). Running backwards is a great way of activating your glutes which play a huge role in stabilising the hips and promoting good form when running forwards. Read more about warming up here.

Route Knowledge

Know your run. If you’re heading out on a new route, make sure you know the terrain, any obstacles, gradients or side-planes and are equipped for the specific weather and conditions that you’re running in.

Train Smart

Increase mileage safely and run with proper form. There are so many resources now online to help guide and direct your training in a ‘smart’ way. This is crucial to preventing injuries if you’re serious about progressing your running. Joining a running club or group is a great way to get guidance and support too.

Increasing Mileage

Beginners should avoid increasing their mileage every week. Instead try every 3-4 weeks. Add an extra day into your running week to increase your weekly mileage. Advanced runners should increase their mileage by 5-10% of their current mileage and remain there until they’re comfortable. This may take several weeks. Injury can occur easily if you ramp up your speed or mileage too quickly. Remember, slow and steady wins the race!

Form

If you’ve been injury free for a long time and you aren’t looking to shave seconds off of your PB, I wouldn’t advise you to alter your running form. However, if you have an injury and a gait analysis suggests you would benefit from altering your form, it would make sense to address this issue. Try to reduce your stride length so that you plant the foot with a vertical shin, this will reduce the forces transmitted through your legs and limit any deceleration from planting your foot too far forward. Also, try to maintain space between the knees. Allowing the thigh to internally rotate or drop in when you run can lead to overuse injuries occurring at the hip, knee and foot. If you need expert advice and guidance on this, consider something like our running rehab service.

Footwear Advice

Ensure that you wear a comfortable shoe that fits well. Rubbing and blisters can put an end to anybody’s run. Don’t be tempted to buy the shoes that look the nicest, fashion won’t help keep you injury free. If you have low arches, find a shoe that supports you in the areas that you need it. Seek professional advice from a reputable running shop where you can try the shoes and they have video gait analysis. Read more about the importance of getting your footwear right here.

Strength Work Between Runs

A stronger kinetic chain will decrease ground reaction forces (GRF), making running more comfortable and more efficient. Working on your core stability will promote the transfer of forces from your upper and lower limbs, meaning less work for your legs. Strong glutes will stabilise your hips and prevent poor biomechanical loading from occurring. Pilates is a great way to help this.

Balance & Proprioception

Proprioception is your body’s awareness of where it is in space – so your joints and brain and muscles all talking to each other! Along with balance, it’s a crucial component to keeping you injury free. It enables your body to cope and respond to uneven terrain, pot holes and curbs and varied weather conditions. Both are very trainable with the right exercises.

If you’ve ever sprained an ankle and haven’t undergone a rehabilitation programme, the chances of you re-spraining that same ankle are very high. After an injury your ankle suffers from a loss of proprioceptive ability and strength, which needs to be rebuilt with balance, proprioception and strength work. If you’re lucky enough to have never sprained an ankle but enjoy running both on and off road, lower limb stability with balance and proprioception work should be a part of your regular gym routine.

Catching Minor Injuries In The Early Stages (Recognition & Treatment)

Being able to recognise the early stages of injury will allow you to nip them in the bud before they become an issue. Examples include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, shin splints, patella tendinopathy, ITB syndrome and muscle strains. As soon as any signs or symptoms are noticed, your best option is to consult an injury specialist. We all know what muscle soreness (DOMS) feels like. If it’s a different pain, don’t run through it.

Cool Down Correctly

Exercise causes our muscles to break down on a microscopic level, which can lead to muscle shortening if left untreated. Stretching after running will help maintain the resting length of your muscles and prevent any imbalances from occurring. Sports massage is a great way of helping recover too. A sports massage will help flush out any lactic acid and waste products left sitting in your muscles following exercise, as well as promote the flow of nutrient-rich blood to those areas to facilitate healing and decrease recovery times.

Sleep

Sleep is very important when talking about injury prevention in runners. When you sleep, hormones are released that promote recovery. When you don’t get enough sleep, stress hormones and inflammatory markers remain elevated which adversely affects your ability to recover. These hormones can also alter appetite regulation, potentially leading to weight gain. To remain injury-free, you need to sleep and recover to the best of your ability. Establish good habits by going to and getting out of bed at the same time each day, and try to get at least 6-7 hours of sleep each night as a minimum, 8 hours is great.


Transitioning from Parkrun to 10k

Posted on 1st January 2018 by

Parkrun started back in 2004 when 13 runners got together on a blustery day in Bushy Park, Teddington, UK. It is now an international family of over half a million runners (and Parkruncounting). The Saturday morning 5km is a regular event in many diaries. With the Hendy Eastleigh 10k and many other longer distance running events round the corner, having nailed a 5k, you may have your sights set on more of a challenge!

So, how do you make the leap from 5k?

When you first started running you probably followed a plan and gradually increased the distance and your body adapted to allow you to run 5km quite happily. Now you want to be able to run even further, this may seem daunting at the beginning. So why not go back to basics and follow the same principle you had when training for 5km.

  1. Set yourself a goal for when you want to be able to achieve 10km, maybe book yourself onto a 10km race, like the Hendy Eastleigh 10k, so you have a goal in mind.
  2. Once you have your goal, follow a training plan that gradually increase your distance each week. There are lots of apps that enable you to enter a date and a distance goal and work backwards and formulate a training plan for you. Just make sure it’s realistic, too much too quickly can overload your body and not give it time to adjust, which is a risk for picking up an injury.
  3. Why not join a running club or seek help from a running coach for advice, tips, and tricks to help your transition from 5km to 10km.
  4. Ensure you have varied distance and speed runs within your training. Use hills and interval training too to add different dimensions to your training.
  5. Listen to your body, if increasing the distance is too hard one week, don’t beat yourself up. Do what you can, the training plan is just a guide.
  6. Allow your body to recover, have rest days. If we don’t allow ourselves rest days, the body does not have time to repair and recover from your last run.
  7. Add in some cross training, try Pilates to improve your movement control, strength and stability, giving you a great stretch and recovery session. Why not go for a swim for some cardiovascular training without the stresses and pressures on you body.
  8. If you start to get a reoccurring niggle or injury get it assessed as soon as possible to prevent it from getting worse.
  9. Listen to some music, an audio book or podcast whilst you run or run with friends to keep the training fun.
  10. Ensure you cool down, stretch, or foam roll. Try using a trigger point MB5 or MB1 ball, which is a great way to release those tight muscles before and after your runs.

Most important of all is to enjoy your training, monitor your progress and don’t panic if you are slightly behind your training schedule remember that is only a guide to help you progress.

SaveSave

SaveSave


How To Start Running

Posted on 28th December 2017 by

So, you’ve read about the benefits of running, you’ve got some trainers, where do you start?

It’s the time of year when many people turn their attention to taking up a new activity or setting a new fitness goal, and running is a common one!

Here’s some top tips from our Sports Therapist, Tom.

If you’ve never run before, don’t let fear of the unknown stop you. Make it easy by following these few steps.

  1. Only start running once you have spent at least two weeks (or are already comfortable exercising regularly) walking or doing another form of exercise for about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. This will help increase your overall activity in preparation for running.
  2. Begin with walk:runs. By adding short bouts of running in to your regular walks you’ll feel stronger, run further and help stop injuries developing. There are lot’s of apps and programmes out there to guide you on this. Eastleigh Borough Council are also starting a Couch to 5k programme as part of their ‘New Year, New You’ initiative. It starts on 17th January 2018 – find more information here.
  3. A good starting point is adding one minute of running for every four minutes of walking, gradually increasing your running time until you are running for twice the amount of time that you spend walking.
  4. Buy a decent pair of running shoes and replace them every 300-500 miles. Worn out shoes are one of the leading causes of injuries amongst runners. Visit a specialist retailer who can analyse your running technique such as Up & Running, Alton Sports or Alexandra Sports.
  5. Set yourself a goal – time or distance, or an event such as a Parkrun.

Official Health Partners of the Hendy Eastleigh 10k

Posted on 5th December 2017 by

We are excited to announce a fantastic new partnership with the Hendy Eastleigh 10k, as we become theEastleigh 10k goPhysio official Health Partner of the race.

One of the largest 10k road races in the country, the Hendy Eastleigh 10k is to be held on Sunday 18th March 2018. It is set to attract around 2,800 runners  and will celebrate it’s 34th anniversary next year.

Clinical Director of goPhysio Paul Baker said he is delighted to be part of such a fantastic event.

Hendy Eastleigh 10k“We help so many runners here at goPhysio and see first hand how important running is to people. To be involved in this great, local event, and have the opportunity to support so many runners is really exciting!”

With just 3 months to go until the Hendy Eastleigh 10k it is never to late to get your running shoes on and get going!

Still need convincing? Here’s a few reasons from our team why running is such a great form of exercise.

Why it’s great to run!

Running is one of the best forms of aerobic exercise for physical conditioning of the heart and
lungs. Studies have shown that running has huge health benefits and it can help you experience more energy, patience, humour and creativity. It can even make you happier! So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running.

Running improves your health Running is a fantastic way to increase your overall health. Research shows that running can raise your levels of good cholesterol, increase lung function, boost your immune system & lower your risk of cardiovascular diseases. running can even fortify your immune system by accelerating the circulation of protective cells.

Running is great for your heart It’s the king of cardio. Running, even 30 minutes or so a few days a week, can help prevent or reduce high blood pressure. According to a landmark study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, running is associated with a drastically reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Running makes you happier The rush of chemicals (endorphins) your body experiences after a run can give you a ‘runners high’. Running can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. A recent study even found that just 30 minutes of running a week, for three weeks, can boost sleep quality, mood and concentration during the day.

It’s easy and convenient Whatever your schedule, you can always squeeze in a run. Just put on your trainer’s and off you go! You can even run whilst your kids cycle or with a baby in a pushchair, take your dog or run your commute!

It’s a cheap way to exercise No gym membership, joining fees or sneaky add-ons. Just the occasional pair of trainers every 500 miles or so, means running is a cost effective way to exercise regularly.

Running seriously torches calories Running is a great calorie burn. It’s one of the best forms of exercise for losing or maintaining consistent weight. The bonus is that the calorie burn continues after you stop running and regular running boosts this “after-burn”, amplifying the effects even more.

It’s a killer leg workout Your body’s biggest muscles are all in your legs and running benefits them all, it’s a great workout to strengthen these important muscles.

You can do it right now Running is such a natural motion, you don’t need to invest in special In the early stage, depending on your targets, you don’t need lessons like many other sports, as running is such a natural motion, just pop on your trainer’s and away you go.

Running strengthens your joints and bones It’s long been known that running helps increases bone mass, and even helps stem age-related bone loss or osteoporosis. It’s also great news for your knees, as a recent study found runners were half as likely to suffer with knee arthritis compared with walkers.

Running can add years to your life It’s recommended that we do at least 30 minutes of exercise, 5 times a week. Making sure you meet these recommendations will help you live a long and healthy life!

Running works your core A surprise to some, but running actually works your core too. The rotation in your spine as you run, challenges your core muscles, helping strengthen your spine. Running on uneven surfaces provides an extra challenge.

Running helps mental health We all live in a busy, stressful time. Running provides the opportunity to take some time purely for yourself, away from your phone, emails, colleagues and kids. You can get primitive with running, giving your brain space to recharge. It can help you to unwind and relax. It’s difficult to come back after a run stressed!

Running improves your sleep Feeling tired from exercise improves your ability to fall and stay asleep. Improving the quality of your sleep is now thought to be a fundamental part of your health and wellbeing. It is even thought that running can help cure insomnia!

Running boosts your confidence Running can boost your confidence and self-esteem. By setting and achieving goals, you can help give yourself a greater sense of empowerment that can leave you much happier and improve your overall feeling of wellbeing and mental health.

It’s a world of discovery Explore new parks, hidden tracks, forests, beaches, river paths, the list goes on. You can run anywhere, any time and enjoy the change of seasons and all the elements as you do.

Running boosts your memory Running can stimulate brain growth as it helps stimulate an increase in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which encourages neural growth.

Running is a great way to socialise Runners, love nothing more than talking to runners about running. There are so many social aspects to running, whether it’s joining a running club, taking part in a Parkrun or training for an event, there’s a lot of support and camaraderie found amongst runners.

There you have it! Many ways in which running can help you become healthier and happier. Every time you run, you’ll improve your resting heart rate, your body will release endorphins, your legs will get stronger and you’ll burn a whole lot of calories. In the end you’ll be happier, fitter and stronger! Remember the key to better health is right under your toes……

So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running. You’ll thank yourself for it!

Eastleigh 10k health partner goPhysio

Enter the Hendy Eastleigh 10k here.


SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Good Luck for the Winchester Half Marathon

Posted on 21st September 2017 by

It’s so great to have so many fantastic running events in our local area. This weekend is the much anticipated Winchester Half. We have lots of patients, friends and family taking place in this local Hampshire event.

And who can guess what the main topic of discussion is in anticipation of this event?…….HILLS!

But don’t let that taint your excitement. Hill’s can be great and here’s a little reminder of some of the benefits of hills, courtesy of Rock Creek Runner.


benefits of hill running

So, when you’re taking on those hilly challenges on Sunday, keep these benefits in mind!

Best of luck to everyone taking part in the Winchester Half Marathon event, we look forward to hearing your marathon stories next week. And if you want to be prepared and book in your recovery massage for next week, don’t forget you can do this online 24/7. So if those hills have taken their toll on Sunday evening, you can book there and then!

SaveSave


Turning back the clock and putting youth back into my step!

Posted on 19th September 2017 by

I’ve been hearing about the wonderful shock absorbing, running gait enhancing, HOKA trainer’s on blogs. from friends and through industry experts, for some time now. After suggesting them to my patients over the last 6 month’s, and hearing great feedback from them too, I finally got round to replacing my old trainer’s with an new pair of HOKA’s.

Kevin, at Up and Running in Chandlers Ford, had explained to me how they were designed with only a 4mm rise from heel-to- toe, with a slight rocker shaped sole, to help with midfoot strike and smooth propulsion. I’d heard similar before and was yet to be convinced!

Well, wearing them last night for my first run I was pleasantly surprised! Immediately my trunk felt more upright, I was naturally and effortlessly mid-foot striking and felt more energetic coupled with comfortable shock absortion soles I literally felt 10 years younger. This is how running used to feel when i was 10kg lighter and 10 years younger!!

So thank you HOKA and Kevin at Up and Running for turning back time!

First impressions, fantastic. I’ll let you know how the fair over time.

Paul, Clinical Director at goPhysio

Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running


Get your running back on track!

Posted on 4th August 2017 by

Every year around 80% of runners will develop a running related injury – these are often caused by inefficient techniques, muscle imbalances, poor training habits and incorrect footwear. Here at goPhysio, we want to keep runners running so our expert physiotherapists are here to help!

Our Running Rehab service is designed for runners of all levels so whether you’re starting out with the ‘Couch to 5K’ or you’re a seasoned marathon runner; if you have a niggling injury that is affecting your running we can help. We can also offer training and technique guidance for those that are new to running, returning after a long break or are struggling to get past a certain mileage.

The Running Rehab assessment includes:

  • A detailed history of your injury, training programme and goals
  • Comprehensive lower limb strength and flexibility assessment to look for muscle imbalances
  • Running assessment on a treadmill with slow motion video analysis and feedback
  • Personalised recovery plan which may include strength and conditioning exercises, running drills, training programme or integrated physiotherapy follow up for specific injury management

Common running conditions that we see include:

Should I book Running Rehab or a Physio Appointment? 

If you can still run at least 1km we would recommend the Running Rehab service as your first port of call for the most comprehensive assessment, however if your pain is stopping your running completely its best to start with normal physiotherapy assessment and treatment until the pain settles. All of our services are integrated so there’s no problem transferring between services, in fact that’s the best way to ensure a full recovery.

The slow-motion video allows us to look at your running style from top to toe, and whilst there is no one perfect technique, it does allow us to easily identify subtle movement dysfunctions or imbalances that are hard to perceive at normal speed. These imbalances can often lead to inefficiencies and even injury in a repetitive sport like running. You will be given instant feedback on how to correct your running style with simple cues and running drills. Together with your injury history this helps us develop an individual personalised recovery programme for you to resolve your injury and improve your running performance.

Benefits of Running Rehab 

  • Speeds up recovery from injury
  • Get back to running as soon as possible
  • Confidence to progress running in the knowledge that you are not causing more damage
  • Comprehensive plan to improve running efficiency, performance, strengthen areas of weakness to help prevent future injuries
  • Achieve your running goals!

Read More

Running Rehab Service 

Common Triathlon Injuries