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goRUN10 – New Running Training Programme to get you to 10k

Posted on 26th March 2018 by

goRun10 10 Running ProgrammeNew Training Programme to get you to 10k!

We are delighted to be teaming up with Mike Chambers, from Next Step Running, to offer you a fully supported run coaching programme, to get you beyond 5k!

With a new Eastleigh 10k date, this is the perfect chance to refocus and get the expert support and guidance to run 10k!

Achieve your goals! Learn lifelong running skills!

Book your place online here! 


What does the programme include?

This unique programme is the perfect combination of a practical running programme with an experienced, qualified coach alongside an informative schedule of educational and practical sessions, structured to support your long term running journey.

The programme will run on a Wednesday evening from 6.30 – 8pm.

Week 1, 11the April –  Introduction to the running programme & getting to know you. This will include what to expect from the programme, outline of the training plan and a gauge of where you all are, so that the programme can be tailored accordingly. We will cover some key important issues in running, so that you can get the most from the programme and maintain lifelong love of running!

Weeks 2 – 9, 25th April – 13th June – These weekly sessions will include a 1 hour supervised run, including not only running but drills, technique, strength and conditioning work and more. There will also be a 30minute practical or educational workshop, covering a different topic each week. These sessions will include the following:

  • Warm up and cool down – dynamic stretching vs static stretching – why & how.
  • 10k Training – key components – interval training, threshold & tempo runs, hills, the long run and running easy.
  • Tapering and last week preparation.
  • Strength training for runners.
  • Foam rolling for runners.
  • Race day – hydration & fuelling, pacing for 10k, post race recovery
  • Pilates for runners.
  • Managing load & capacity, making sure you avoid injury.

By adding this unique, educational element, to your running programme, you will benefit from being able to ‘run better’ – avoiding injuries, achieving your goals and loving your running!

Why would I benefit from a supported running coach programme?

With access to so many online training plans, running apps, free running groups and with running training programmes in every magazine, Running Coaching can be seen as a luxury only needed for elite level athletes. Surely everyone can run anyway? It’s just a matter of how fast and how far! You just need a pair of trainers!

But think again! Recreational runners arguably benefit more from a structured running programme with a qualified, experienced Running Coach than those club level racing snakes!

Too many runners do the same run several times a week, run too hard too often, plateau and / or pick up an injury. These issues can really hamper enjoyment of running and progress and often cause people to give up on running. With the right education, guidance and support, we can help you avoid this.

Having a structured programme with a Coach will motivate you, challenge you when they think you can give more, but more often than not recognise when you need to back off and take it easy!  A Coach will structure your week so you include all the key components to make you a fitter, stronger and faster runner.

How much is the programme?

The 9 week programme costs £79. This will include:

  • Week 1 introductory session
  • Bespoke 8 week training programme based on 3 sessions per week
    • 8 x 1.5 hour weekly sessions with the Running Coach & goPhysio
    • 2 x homework sessions to do with the rest of your group or on your own in between
  • Support on creating more variety in your running, including hill sessions,interval training and strength & conditioning work, with lots of support and tips to help you build strength and speed throughout the sessions
  • Email support throughout the programme
  • 10% off at goPhysio for Physiotherapy, Sports Therapy or Sports Massage, should you need it

Who is this for?

This programme is suitable for those who are able to run at least 5k. Maybe you’re a Parkrun regular but aren’t sure how to get to the next level. You may have signed up to the Eastleigh 10k but heaved a sigh of relief when it got postponed as you weren’t ready. Maybe you’ve run comfortably on your own but now want some extra support in a group environment. Or it might be you’ve recently returned to running from an injury and want to make sure you are armed with the right skills and knowledge so you don’t get injured again?

Places are limited, please book your place here or to find out more or if you have any questions, email fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk

 

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Easing Post Run Soreness

Posted on 18th March 2018 by

You’ve done it, you’ve got off the couch and finished that run! Whether it’s a gentle recreational run, a 10k or a full marathon, post run soreness can be part of the journey. It’s just your muscles adapting to the additional demands placed upon them, which is good!

You can read more about post exercise pain here.

There are some tried and tested steps you can take, that help to ease post run soreness. Here’s a few from our Sports Therapist, Tom.

  1. Rest

It may seem obvious but resting from physical exertion will allow sore muscles time to rebuild. However, there is a big difference between complete rest and active recovery. Complete rest can result in decreased range of motion and prolonged soreness. Active recovery is defined by a light workout comprising of lower intensity and volume which facilitates the removal of waste products and restores normal resting length of muscles. For example, a runner with sore legs may opt for 30 minutes on a static bike at a steady pace.

  1. Sports Massage

Muscle soreness following a run can be effectively eased with sports massage. The massage techniques used will decrease exercise-induced inflammation, improve blood flow and reduce muscle tightness. Sports massage can also have an effect on the nervous system by down-regulating it to allow the muscles to relax. Manual therapy techniques can stimulate the lymphatic system which helps drain swelling and by-products of exercise out of the damaged muscles. Increased blood flow to these areas will bring new nutrient-rich blood to facilitate the repair phase following intense exercise. You can book your sports massage online here.

  1. Self-Myofascial Release

Performed using tools such as foam rollers, trigger point balls, massage sticks, etc. Similar to massage, this technique allows you to self-treat by targeting the muscles that need it most. You will be able to ease inflammation, improve blood flow and restore the normal resting length of muscles. Read more about foam rolling here. If you want to learn more, why not come along to one of our monthly foam rolling practical workshops.

  1. Food & Hydration

You can utilise a few simple nutrition strategies to restore homeostasis and facilitate muscle repair. Eat high-glycemic fruits and starchy vegetables following exercise to replenish glycogen stores in muscles. Antioxidants present in these foods can also aid tissue repair and recovery. Eating foods high in protein (such as eggs) can enhance energy production and stimulate protein synthesis, which repairs damaged muscles from intense training. Fish oils (omega 3) also contain anti-inflammatory properties which will help ease post-race soreness.

A reduction in hydration of only 2 percent is enough to have detrimental effects on maximal strength and athletic performance due to a drop in blood plasma volume. This limits the amount of nutrients and energy received by the working muscles. Drink frequently throughout the day to keep yourself hydrated and reduce the risk of delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS).

  1. Sleep

Make sure you get between 7-8hours of sleep each night. Sleep is important as it not only restores brain function and alertness, but it also regulates growth hormone release and protein synthesis. Your muscles do all their repair work whilst you sleep, so getting enough shut-eye is crucial when training. During the restorative phase of sleep your blood pressure drops, breathing slows and blood flows to the muscles and soft tissue that need repair.

  1. Compression

Specific garments can be worn during and after intense exercise to reduce the amount of residual inflammation in working tissues. We know that muscles are damaged when we exercise, this damage causes inflammation which can also irritate nerve endings and result in prolonged pain/soreness. The idea behind compression is to limit the space available for soft tissues to swell with inflammation, thus reducing pain levels. Compression with movement will also facilitate the removal of waste products and inflammation out of working/damaged tissues.

  1. Heat

It is well established that heat can be a great pain-reliever. Applying heat to sore muscles can encourage a relaxation effect. The warmth will also vasodilate blood vessels allowing for nutrient-rich blood to be brought to the area that needs repair.

  1. Stretching

You may be surprised to hear that stretching isn’t as effective at easing muscle soreness as you may have thought. Think about it this way; the most traumatic form of muscle contraction is an eccentric one. This occurs when you contract a muscle over a period of time whilst it is lengthening, for example the lowering phase of a bicep curl. This muscle has been damaged (on a microscopic level) by a lengthening-based exercise. You are then attempting to ease that soreness by stretching the muscle, which is only lengthening it further. Also noteworthy is the role of the central nervous system, which uses pain as a protective signalling mechanism to prevent the same movement from occurring again. Stretching a painful area is likely to produce a larger nervous system response resulting in increased pain levels.

A review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in 2011 concludes that stretching does not ease soreness following exercise.

Herbert RD, de Noronha M, Kamper SJ. Stretching to prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD004577. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004577.pub3.

  1. Ice

A golden rule to follow when considering ice vs heat for different situations is this; ice for acute, traumatic injuries to be used predominantly for pain relief and not much else. Heat is to be used for chronic, dull, achy pain such as joint stiffness or muscle tightness.

When applying ice to an injured area it can cause blood vessels to constrict, limiting blood flow to the area. We need a good blood supply for muscles to regenerate and repair. Ice also causes muscles to tighten which seems to be the opposite effect when searching for muscles relaxation and relief of soreness. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 36 articles published in 2015 suggests that ice (cryotherapy) provides little or no significant effect in the treatment of exercise-induced muscle soreness.

Hohenauer E, Taeymans J, Baeyens J-P, Clarys P, Clijsen R (2015) The Effect of Post-Exercise Cryotherapy on Recovery Characteristics: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. PLoS ONE 10(9): e0139028. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0139028

If your soreness doesn’t ease after a few days or you are in pain as you think you may have picked up an injury, do get it checked out. The sooner you get an expert diagnosis of what’s going on and a specific recovery plan, the less time you’ll have off running!


Top 10K Recovery Tips from goPhysio

Posted on 16th March 2018 by

Well done! You’ve completed your 10k race! If you’re a 10k regular, you may have learnt the bast way to tackle post race recovery. But for some, it may be your first 10k event. What you do after an event can really help or hinder your recovery and set you on the right path for continuing your running journey!

Not sure what is best to do to help your recovery. Well don’t worry, here are goPhysio’s top tips for your recovery:

  1. Cool Down – you cross the finish line and the last thing you want to do is keep moving, but a gentle jog or walk will help to steadily slow down your heart rate and allow the build up of waste products in the muscles to be flushed out.
  2. Hydration – Keeping hydrated is essential to allow the muscle to stay elastic and malleable; after all your muscle are made up of up to 70% water.
  3. Refuel – within 30 mins of your race it is important to refuel with a small meal high in carbohydrates and protein. This will help to prevent the onset of muscle soreness as this is the optimal time that the body will use the carbohydrates to rebuild glycogen stores.
  4. Rest– after you have celebrated running your 1st,5th,15th 10km race, get an early night. Sleep is when our body heals, so it is important to give your body the best chance of healing those sore muscles and giving you the best recovery.
  5. Active Recovery – The day after your 10k race try to get your body moving, go for a walk, swim, cycle or even a light jog. This will get you heart pumping increasing circulation around the body continuing to flush out any waste products (lactic acid).
  6. Massage – Book yourself a sports massage. You have trained hard and reached your goal of running the 10km so why not treat yourself to a recovery massage the day after the race. This will help relax those tight muscles, increase the blood flow to the muscle and help prevent DOMS. Don’t forget to take advantage of our race day offers, you can get 20% off your sports massage until 30th April.
  7. Listen to your body – if your feeling sore a day or two after your run then try to listen to your body and what it needs. Take your time to get back into your running routine.
  8. Celebrate – you’ve done it, what a great achievement! Be proud of yourself and celebrate what you’ve achieved. Whether it’s your first 10k or one of many, well done from us all at goPhysio!

Eastleigh 10k – 10 day countdown with Next Step Running & goPhysio

Posted on 9th March 2018 by

After a somewhat unexpected and disruptive week of snow, it has been nice to see a return to the normality of early spring…lovely to see the sun and of course rain and near impossible to do a run without thinking you have too many / too few layers on!

The run up to the Eastleigh 10k always includes a daily weather watch and such is our British weather in March there is no guessing what the weather will be on the day. Hint of summer sun…or return to biting winds and rain?? We will see.

Last night, we were joined by Running Coach, Mike Chambers from Next Step Running and 13 keen runners who have signed up for the 2018 installment of the ever growing and popular Eastleigh 10k road race, to talk through their last 10 days preparation…and yes this included the weather!

Mike has kindly written this guest blog post for us.

The evening began with introductions with a mixed audience of first time 10k runners through to the more experienced runners in the hunt for a new PB. But what unites all us runners is the thirst for information to improve your running and the mind games that go on in your head in those final few days.

We talked through dealing with nerves, trying to get the whole thing in some perspective compared with the really important things in our lives….and could we all run a little bit more like Eluid Kipchoge…not as fast but at least with a smile on our face!

Tapering

One of the hot topics of debate for this evening (and every evening you spend with a group of runners) was focused on the last week of training and tapering before a key race. The greatest fear among many new runners is getting to the start line tired from training in the last week, but in my experience, backing off too much is more likely to leave you feeling flat come the big day. Our bodies crave routine, so just take out some of the volume (30%), just tweak the intensity down a notch and keep the same number of running days….and don’t go to Ikea the day before race day! Easy runs with ‘race pace’ strides (4 or 5 x 30 second bursts) or even ‘pick up’ miles at the end on your easy runs is a simple taper for new runners over a 10k distance. This will keep your body in tune with the pace needed on the day, without digging too deep.

Food

And of course we talked about food! In a world of super foods and diet programmes and get fit quick solutions, I like to keep things simple. As long as you are eating a sensible balanced diet, keep to it, no major changes and no major carb load! The small taper in your training in the last week will act as a carb load if you maintain your usual diet. Yes, to a carb based meal the night before, but more importantly, graze through Saturday with little and often approach to snacks. And we tried to dispel myths and one claim on the night that new research suggested you don’t need any carbs at all!

Hydration

Make sure your body is hydrated through those last few days, and don’t go chugging water Sunday morning…you will feel heavy…and be in a long queue for the toilet. Keep up some electrolyte in take through a sports drink on the day. Gels – realistically unless running over 70-80 minutes for the 10k, you wont need fueling during the race, your body will have all the glycogen stores you need to fire you to the finish.

Race Day Prep

Most runners I know are creatures of habit and getting the timetable right on the day is critical to avoid a full meltdown! This works best by working backwards from the race start time, breakfast around 2 hours before this. Thinking through travel and parking on the day. Kit laid out day before (OK, I will be honest, I have laid my kit out at least 3 days before!!). Race number pinned on and check and double check have everything you need…..remember the weather…this could be vest or t shirt, but equally we may be looking at base layer, hat and gloves. A layer to keep on to the very last minute also worth having.

Race day is about trusting in your training and committing to what you set out to do, be it just get round or chasing that PB. Visualise achieving your goal, crossing the line and getting the medal and t-shirt will help you to make that your reality.

Next Step Running LogoSo, to all of you doing your first 10k, chasing a new PB or whatever your motivation for getting out there on race day, smile, commit to your pace and the very best of luck.

Mike Chambers, Running Coach

Next Step Running 

 


5 Tips for the Romsey 5 Mile Run 2018

Posted on 22nd January 2018 by

This Sunday is the Romsey 5 Mile Run of 2018. The Romsey 5 Mile Run is set within the grounds of The Broadlands Estate, Romsey, Hampshire, once the home of The Earl Romsey 5 Mile RunMountbatten of Burma. The surface is mainly tarmac with a short distance of smooth hardcore.  The course is 2.5 laps of the estate making it one of the flattest 5 mile races in the county and as such attracts athletes from further a field looking for a PB time.

5 miles is a tough distance. It’s uncommon and hides nicely between those big 10km races and your weekly 5km parkrun. It’s an underrated distance and hence often underestimated. It’s a brilliant training run and a very credible distance to take the opportunity to clock some good times. It’s not a plod but it’s far from sprinting – it’s the sweet spot of speed and endurance. So just because it’s shorter doesn’t mean you can get away with no training! So we have put together 5 tips in time for the Romsey 5 miles!

  1. The best way to tackle such a peculiar distance is to mix up your training. Try a variety of different sessions which help to train different aspects of your fitness. Interval training will help with speed, long runs will ensure you have the stamina, whilst gym/resistive training to get the power your legs need to drive through those last kilometres. Fartlek training is also great to get a better understanding of your pace – timing that sprint finish and camera composure is invaluable!
  2. The shorter the distance you are competing, the more important it is that you warm up thoroughly. For 5 miles, it’s an essential. A good warm up should be about half an hour in total. You should consider starting to warm up about an hour before the race begins. This may seem a bit keen, but trust me – when you take into account the time taken striping down to shorts/vest, getting that last toilet break in and then the minutes taken just standing around at the start line, that hour will fly by. Get running for at least 10 minutes. During the warm up incorporate dynamic stretches– high knees, heel flicks, side strides, ring the bell, straight legged march – remember those from secondary school P.E? – well turns out they are useful after all! They get the muscles working more effectively and ready to go – reducing your risk of injury considerably. Read more about warming up for running here.
  3. But the preparation doesn’t just start at the warm up! If you have event looming and you’re already starting to get some aches and niggles, invest in a course of Sports Massage. Sports Massage will keep those niggles from developing into full blown injuries, supporting you through your training, getting you to race day in one piece!
  4. Lungs collapsing, knees about to give way and the body demands food, baths or just bed! But you’ll save yourself a lot of trouble with a good cool down – you’ll thank yourself if you can motivate yourself for a 10 minute plod! This will flush the lactic and waste products from the muscles by introducing fresh oxygenated blood. If there is a masseur on hand, make the most of them – they’ll do most of that more you! Also do a mix of dynamic and static stretches to relax the muscles.
  5. Just because the event has come and gone, doesn’t mean you switch off. That warm down will have helped avoid those stiff and achy legs, but by having a follow up recovery Sports Massage, you’ll cleanse your body from that event, and focus on the next one! You can book your massage online here 24/7.

Good Luck to all doing the Romsey 5 Miles, especially those doubling up and doing the Hendy Eastleigh 10K too! Look forward to seeing familiar faces!

Cameron Knapp – goPhysio Sports Massage Therapist

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Post Marathon Recovery Tips

Posted on 23rd April 2017 by

Whatever your running challenge, whether you’ve run a full 26.2 miles at The London Marathon, ABP Southampton Marathon, the 13.1 miles ABP Half or taken part in a 10k or 5k run, these events can take their toll on your body and mind.

What you do post race plays an important part in your recovery, just like your training and race preparation.

Here’s our top tips to maximise your recovery

  1. Keep hydrated, drink plenty of fluids following the race and in the days after.
  2. Take a bath in Epsom salts and alternate this with a contrasting cool bath or shower to really stimulate circulation.
  3. Make sure you keep moving. However tempting it is to just collapse in an exhausted heap and have a few relaxing days, if you can keep your body lightly active it will help your recovery. Doing some gentle alternative exercise such as swimming or yoga can really help in the week or so after an event. It can take about 2 weeks post marathon for your muscles to return to full strength, so ease back into running gradually.
  4. Increase your protein intake following the event to aid the recovery process.
  5. Invest in a post event sports massage. This will help ease any muscle stiffness and soreness, and improve recovery rate. The best timing for a light massage is 1 to 3 days post event, or 3 to 5 days post event for a deeper tissue massage. You can also use a foam roller, massage stick or massage ball to ease up and loosen out tight areas.

Read More: Exercise Pain – What you need to know about DOMS

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