Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Patient Stories #1 How Shockwave got Mike back running

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

Today, local runner, Personal Trainer & Running Coach, Mike, shares with us his story of recovery from Plantar Fasciitis.

As a bit of a brief background, Mike developed plantar fasciitis in both of his feet, after a period of increasing his running mileage 14 months ago. The painful condition affected him so much that he had to stop doing what he loved – run. When he finally came to see us, he hadn’t run for over a year. Having tried many other treatments and ways to tackle his plantar fasciitis, Mike wanted to give Shockwave Therapy a go. Both he and we are delighted with the progress that he made and within 6 weeks or so, he was back competing in his first 10k in over a year, pain free!

We asked Mike to share more about his experience and how Shockwave Therapy helped him finally recover from his plantar fasciitis.

Tell us more about your injury Mike?

In October 2017 I started to increase my weekly running miles as part of my winter training. I was focused on attending the World Masters Athletics championships in 2018. My weekly volume was 45 miles per week and I was running both cross-country and half marathon events. Since the summer of 2017 I had been experiencing post training calf tightness and this increasingly manifested in painful heels in the morning when getting up or after period of rest.

For some time I didn’t really address this as was still managing to train but by December 2017 the pain in the morning and calf tightness when running was so much that I had to stop running completely. 

From seeing a physio I was told I was experiencing bilateral (both feet) plantar fasciitis.

How was it affecting your life? 

Unable to train to my previous volume and intensity for months, it became clear I would not be able to compete at the World Master Championships in the Summer of 2018. In fact, the pain was so much that I didn’t compete in any races throughout 2018. This was very difficult to accept and greatly affected my mental wellbeing. Running is important to me for fitness but always plays a huge part of in my wellbeing. I am also a running coach and personal trainer and was increasingly unable to run with clients and the athletes I train. The injury was also therefore affecting my professional career.

What treatment had you tried before Shockwave? 

During the first months of the symptoms I had regular sports massage and also used a foam roller at home. I had sessions of acupuncture and dry needling. Whilst all these treatments relieved symptoms in the immediate term, none seemed to ultimately reduce the discomfort once I increased my training volume.

What did the Shockwave treatment feel like?

ECSWT Plantar Fasciitis

Shockwave treatment was certainly not as uncomfortable as I had feared! I guess it is like deep tissue massage. There were times when this can be uncomfortable, but only for short periods, and has a similar ‘good pain’ feel to it. 

There were post treatment symptoms where my heels would feel sore for a number of days after but this soon reduced. Gradually through the course of treatment it was clear the symptoms of plantar fasciitis were reducing the consequently the discomfort of the actual treatment also reduced. 

Where are you now with your injury?

Plantar Fasciitis Shockwave Treatment

I have finished the treatment and I am now starting to increase my running volume again. Last week I competed in the Stubbington 10k. The first time I have been able to compete in a race since October 2017! Whilst no where near my previous form I was delighted to run the 10k in 40:51 which is very encouraging for 2019. 

I now need to be sensible with small weekly increases of mileage and continue with strengthening exercises to my feet and calves and regular stretching and sports massage. But overall I am so pleased with the treatment and the effect it is had on my symptoms. 

Do you have any advice for anyone considering Shockwave?

Do your own background reading to make sure you understand what the treatment does. Try to address your symptoms through other options first. But if you have a chronic and stubborn injury, Shockwave treatment should certainly be a serious option to explore. The goPhysio team will explain the whole process, and potential outcomes. 


The entire team at goPhysio is highly professional and genuinely cares and is committed to getting you pain free and getting you back to doing what you love. I would encourage anyone to get in touch for a consultation and know you will be in first class hands.shockwave

Mike Chambers
Hampshire Shockwave Therapy

Hampshire Shockwave Therapy is brought to you by goPhysio. It is a highly effective treatment for helping long standing, stubborn conditions that have failed respond to other treatments. These include plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinopathy, tennis and golfers elbow and patella tendinopathy, amongst others. It is a genuine and successful alternative to steroid injections and even surgery for many conditions.

If your life is being affected by a long term injury and you’d like to find out whether Shockwave Therapy could help you like it did Mike, complete this brief questionnaire and we’ll be in touch. You can also give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to find out more.



Top 5 Running Injuries & How to Manage Them

Posted on 29th January 2018 by

Injured runners make up a huge proportion of the people we help here at goPhysio. The repetitive nature of the activity inherently makes it a sport where injuries are quite a common occurrence.

In this blog, I will share with you some insider information built up over a lifetime of clinical practice in the sports injury sector, treating 1,000’s of active patient’s with overuse, lower limb injuries.

I’d like to shed some insider light on the 5 most common running injuries and debunk some myths, helping you understand these injuries better, and give you some guidance on how to prevent and manage them if they do occur.

5 Most Common Running Injuries

The 5 most common running injuries we see here at goPhysio are:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Achilles Tendonopathy
  • Calf Tears and trigger points
  • Anterior Knee Pain
  • Gluteal / Piriformis syndrome

Interestingly enough, all these injuries can originate from a similar movement dysfunction.

Starting at the foot with flattened foot arches or over-pronation, there is often a chain of biomechanics events leading up the leg to the trunk. These are nicely illustrated in this diagram. .Biomechanics chain of events

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar-fasciitis is a fancy, latin word for inflammation of the plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is a thickened sheet of fascia (connective tissue) on the sole of the feet, it’s elasticity gives us a spring in our step when walking or running. The cause of plantar-fasciitis is linked to it being on an excessive stretch for prolonged periods of time, when the arches in your foot are too flat. So on push off when walking or running it’s excessively overloaded and stretched and overtime micotrauma, inflammation, pain and injury can result. Read more about plantar fasciitis here.

Achilles Tendonopathy

Flattened foot arches results in an inwards collapse of the heel bone (calcaneum) into which the achilles inserts. Thus with each step the heel bone excessively moves side to side, in a side-to-side whipping type motion of the achilles resulting in a build of force, overuse, microtrauma, inflammation, pain & injury! Read more about achilles tendon injuries here.

Calf Tears & Recurrent Myofascial Trigger Points

Again a similar mechanism to above. Over time, the calf muscles become tense and tight, they tend top hold a long term dull background contraction in an attempt to control the inward collapse of the heel bone. This increased tone is aggravated by running (we take approx 1,000 steps per km, per foot), resulting in tense, tight, overactive and painful muscles, which worsen with running and can become a long term or chronic issue. It feels especially tight after hill sessions, when the calf or achilles is also on stretch. Read more about calf tears here. 

Read more about the treatment of calf tears here.

Anterior Knee Pain

Anterior knee pain is an umbrella term, used to describe a wide range of injuries causing pain in the front of the knee. Although everyone is unique, in runner’s it is often linked to flattened foot arches and the inward collapse of the heel with it’s knock on effects felt through the whole kinetic chain (as per the diagram above). This inward heel collapse causes the shin bone (tibia) to rotate inwards and the knee will fall inwards, resulting in an asymmetrical build of of forces in structures around the front of the knee and some of the most common running knee injuries, namely; Infra-patellar tendonopathy, Patello-femoral joint map-tracking and Ilio-tibial Band friction syndrome (ITB syndrome). Read more about runners knee here.

Gluteal / Piriformis Syndrome

So, as the heel collapses inwards, we get internal rotation of the legs and hips. Subsequently, the gluteal (buttock) muscles become tense and tight in an attempt to control the inward rotation and movement of the leg and hip. This increased tone over a run (approx 1,000 steps per km, per foot), can result in tense, tight, overactive painful muscles. This often worsens with running and can become long term or chronic, which often results in referred pain travelling down the leg mimicking sciatica. Over my career I’ve even seen patients with this condition that mistakengly have been operated on, (the Surgeon thought it was a disc injury causing the sciatica) when it was merely this “Piriformis syndrome” referring into his leg.

The Solution

With all of these conditions, it’s crucial to understand that……..

the injured structure is actually the victim, the true cause is the uncontrolled movement!

Effective management of such injuries therefore needs to address the following:

From the foot upwards – Fully assessing foot position and biomechanics, looking at incorporating custom orthotics to correct the foot positioning and alignment and control excessive movement and rotation from the foot up the whole lower limb.

From the spine / “core” downwards – This is a crucial and often forgotten element, improving muscle stability and movement control throughout the body. Pilates is great for this.

Reduce inflammation – Ice and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories are an effective way to reduce inflammation in the early stages.

‘Hands-on’ Physio treatments – In the early stages, massage and acupuncture to normalise muscle tone, taping to correct alignment and ultrasound to stimulate natural healing, can all be effective ways to help ease pain and discomfort to help you quickly progress into active recovery.

Selective rest – Means to just rest from the aggravating (pain causing) activities, whilst actively participating in non-aggravating activities such as swimming or cycling to maintain movement and fitness. As we’re designed to move, movement in itself is therapeutic. We can really help guide you on this, as many people think if they have an injury they just need to completely rest.

Running Rehabilitation – Specific exercises, training advice and a return-to-running programme are all crucial to ensure a positive, long term return to running injury free.

Preventing these Injuries

We are our own normal

I want to reassure you that we are all different. We all have biomechanical differences that our bodies cope just fine with, we are our own ‘normal’. So, if you have ‘flattened arches’ but are able to run a marathon with no issues, nothing needs to change! You don’t need to address this ‘just in case’. Pain or injuries, such as those above, often arise when we are demanding too much of our body too soon, without giving it time to adapt to the demands – so in running, increasing distance or speed too quickly, changing the terrain etc. So much of the skill in preventing these injuries comes down to our training technique and running habits, combined with our body’s own ability to adapt.

However, what we often see is that a small biomechanical issue such as those explained above, combined with demanding too much of our body too soon, results in the body complaining with one of these injuries. Runners then get stuck in an injury cycle, where they can’t run without getting pain. By fully understanding and addressing the combination of biomechanical issues and training, this is the most effective way to overcome the injury and continue to enjoy a lifelong love of running!

By Paul Baker MCSP, goPhysio Clinical Director


SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Beware of the Flip Flop!

Posted on 16th June 2017 by

Today, 16th June 2017, sees National Flip Flop Day! (Yes, that really is a national day!!) With the wonderful weather this week and set to be beautiful over the weekend, flip flops are are common footwear of voice!

Flip flops are great for chucking on to get from the car to the beach and walking around the pool. But this footwear is playing havoc with our feet!

In the summer months we see so many people coming into the clinic with foot and ankle problems such as achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. In many of the people with knee, hip & back problems that come to see us, we also find that a sudden increase in wearing flip flops for long periods of time has played a part in their problem.

Flip flops provide no support for your feet, they are often made of very flexible rubber with little additional structure to hold your foot in place. This causes considerable stress to your feet as you rely on your toes to grip with every step and the additional stress placed on your plantar fascia, achilles tendon and other structures in your foot.

National Flip Flop DaySo, if you’re going for a longer walk or going to be on your feet all day, ditch the flip flop and wear something more supportive. If you’ve noticed you’re suddenly getting pain in your foot ankle or other part of your leg or back and have been wearing flip flops more now the sun is out, try reducing how much you wear them and see if this makes a difference.

#NationalFlipFlopDay


Read More

Achilles teninopathies

Plantar Fasciitis

Custom Orthotics

 

 

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave


16 Days To Go – Spiky Ball Countdown Giveaway & Some Great Exercises!

Posted on 3rd December 2016 by

Today we are giving away one of our favourites – a spiky ball! This ball can work wonders for easing off tight, sore muscles and areas of tension.

Ball Back Release 

This is a great exercise if you sit at a desk or drive a lot. It really helps to loosen up a stiff back and counteract the affects of being hunched over.

  1. ball-releaseSit at the wall with the ball at the bottom of the stiff upper back curve, feet planted firmly on the ground. Place your hands on your breastbone to guide the lift.
  2. Keeping the chin tucked, lift up with the breastbone to lever up over the ball. The head should move towards the wall ball-relesae-2because of the lift, but not because the neck has arched back.
  3. You can use a bit of a push up through the feet to encourage the lift.
  4. After loosening one level, move the tennis balls up a level and repeat. You can continue up to the top level of the upper back, but not into the low neck.

Plantar Fasciitis Ball Massage 

We often recommend self massage for the common foot complaint, plantar fasciitis. It really helps release the tightness and ease discomfort. Heres how:

planatr-fascia-ball

  1. Stand up and step on a hard ball with the foot.
  2.  Move the ball under your foot to find tender spots.
  3. Once you are on a tender spot, hold the position while applying pressure. You can hold the position as recommended to release the trigger point.
  4. Next, move to another tender area.

 


For your chance to win a very useful spiky ball, like or follow us on social media and share this post!


Foot Pain: Could It Be Plantar Fasciitis?

Posted on 8th October 2016 by

We are seeing and hearing from an increasing number of people who are suffering with quite debilitating pain on the sole of their foot. This common complaint is often the result of a condition known as Plantar Fasciitis.

Interestingly, over the last week I’ve met 8 people hobbling about with this painful foot condition and not one of these people were aware of what physio could do for plantar fasciitis.

So today’s blog is to educate you about plantar fasciitis and help you banish it for good.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Fascia is connective tissue which is found all over the body in various forms for different functions. It’s most common forms are sheaths surrounding muscles and ligaments to compartmentalise and  protect these tissues or thickened fascial bands or sheets in certain areas of the body.Plantat Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is a thickened sheet of fascia on the sole of the feet, running from the inside base of the heel bone and fanning out into the base of the toes. It’s elasticity gives us a spring in our step when walking or running.

Plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury to the fascial sheet on the sole of the foot.

Causes of Plantar Fasciitis

The main cause of plantar fasciitis is caused by

the plantar fascia being put under excessive stretch for prolonged periods of time. This can happen for example when your foot arches are too flat, so that as you push off when you’re walking or running the fascia excessively overloaded and stretched. Over time microtrauma, injury and pain result.

The foot can also be termed the “rubbish bin” of the body, where asymmetries further up the body can result in compensations in the foot. The body will compensate up to a point, but due to the excessive forces during the propulsion as you move that go through your feet, the foot may adapt by stiffening up and thickening of the plantar fascia. So sometimes, it can be something going on further up the body that may put too much stress on your foot, that will in turn cause this problem.

Symptoms

Plantar fasciitis is normally felt as a pain on the bottom of your foot, sometimes going into your heel.

Unfortunately plantar fasciitis is often confused with another foot problem called calcaneal bursitis heel pain). Without a thorough examination, most plantar foot problems are diagnosed as plantar fasciitis.

So a quick test you can do yourself to indicate whether your foot pain is plantar fasciitis or not is to see which is more painful; walking on your tip toes or your heels.

If it is painful to walk a few steps on your heels, you may have an element of calcanea bursitis. If it’s more painful too walk on tip toes (stretching plantar fascia), it’s likely you havre plantar fasciitis.

Why is it so painful 1st thing in the morning or after I’ve been sat for a while and then get up?

Plantar fasciitis is usually painful after a period of rest. The reason being is that when you’re sat for a while or asleep in bed, the fascia is off loaded and re-tightens. When you get back up on your feet, you are re-stretching the tight, painful fascia. It may ease a little as you start to move around as it effectively ‘warms up’ and stretches.

What can affect recovery?

There are many factors that will affect the speed of recovery. Seeing an expert Physiotherapist who has a wide range of experience treating lower limb overuse injuries is vital to identify all the factors and work towards removing or modifying the triggers unique to you.

The most common triggers for foot problems such as plantar fasciitis are:

Biomechanics It’s crucial to assess whether your foot and leg biomechanics (e.g. flattened arches, knocked knees etc.) are contributing to your injury and may need correcting. Here at goPhysio, our Physio’s can do this quite easily as part of your initial session by combining their physical assessment findings with performing a computerised foot screen using our cutting edge Gaitscan system.

Training Patterns and Intensity If a runner or keen walker has the condition, it’s vital to look at the historical loading of the fascia and modify their training schedule to a level that allows the condition to heal. Without breaking the cycle, the tissues won’t be able to recover. However, we like to keep people doing what they love, so rather than advise complete rest, we try wherever possible, to modify your activity or suggest alternatives in the short term that will promote recovery.

Lower Limb Stability Often muscle imbalances further up your body in your knee, hip or pelvis, will have an impact on the foot. As part of your recovery we will always address these elements too to help prevent re-occurrences.

Age Research suggests that older people experience more severe and more prolonged episodes of inflammation and pain. So, if you’re 40 years plus and enjoy an active lifestyle, your pain is unlikely to settle with just rest. It will be easily aggravated when you resume normal activities, as the cause and actual injury hasn’t been addressed.

Footwear Unsupportive, flat, old, worn out shoes or trainers can both contribute to causing plantar fasciitis and will inevitably prolong the condition.

Physiotherapy

At goPhysio, with a condition like plantar fasciitis, we always treat the condition as part of the bigger picture. Not only will we treat your foot itself, but we will look from the foot upwards and from the hip downwards, ensuring we leave you with no issues that will contribute to a re-occurrence.

Having identified all the factors unique to your condition, we will then address and correct them in parallel with hands-on physiotherapy treatments and education. It’s crucial to manually release the tight thickened plantar fascia with a variety of release techniques. You will also be provided with a bespoke home exercise programme for you to self treat at home and speed up your recovery in-between physio sessions.

We can also asses you to find out if you’d benefit from orthotics. In most cases of plantar fasciitis there is a biomechanics component that needs addressing. This can be achieved with orthotics. As outlined above, fattened arches will lower your body’s ability to cope with loading either from day-to-day actives or sport. At goPhysio we use a technologically advanced system called Gaitscan, which uses computer scanning to analyse your moving foot Combined with a physical assessment, the physio can identify if you’d benefit from wearing orthotics and subsequently discuss the range of options available to you to get you back on your feet a quickly.

What next?

If you think you may be suffering with plantar fasciitis or you have foot pain and aren’t sure what exactly it is, just give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or book an initial physiotherapy appointment online.

We can also offer you a free computerised foot analysis to see whether you’d benefit from orthotics. These analyses are completely free with no obligation. Call and quote Free Gaitscan to take advantage of this offer and find out whether orthotics could help you.


What are orthotics?

Posted on 30th August 2016 by

What are orthotics?

Orthotics, orthoses, shoe inserts, insoles……whatever name they are known by, are foot supports which fit in your shoes to help your feet move more efficiently. They are made of moulded pieces of rubber, leather, plastic, or other synthetic material that are inserted into a shoe. The aim of orthotics is to balance the foot in a neutral position and cushion the foot from too much pounding.

There are 2 types of orthoses, over the counter (OTC) orthotics and custom orthotics.

OTC or ‘Off the Shelf’ Orthotics

These give arch support to your foot. However, they are made in a generic shape and may not be suited to all. They may match some people’s arches, but for others the arch support may be too high, too low, or too far back or too far forward. OTC orthotics can work really well in some people, particularly if they already fit your foot well and any issues you may have are very minor. Prices of OTC orthotics can vary massively. Like most things, you get what you pay for. A very cheap orthotic will wear down very quickly and not provide support for any length of time, rendering it pointless! At goPhysio, if you’re not sure about whether orthotics are for you, we can often recommend OTC orthotics to give it a try. We also advise certain OTC orthotics for more minor issues. Our OTC orthotics are priced at around £65.

Custom Orthotics

These orthotics on the other hand are designed to specifically fit your feet and work more efficiently than OTC supports. They are designed specifically for an individual to balance the biomechanical inadequacies of your feet and legs. Here at goPhysio we use a Gaitscan system to measure and analyse how your foot works alongside the skill of your Physiotherapist. They will look at your feet and legs, analyse your movement, measure your foot position and put all this together in the bigger picture with your symptoms & lifestyle. This hug amount of information will enable them to prescribe the best custom orthotic for you and your lifestyle.

Here’s a little bit more about the custom made orthotics we prescribe.


Both types of inserts aim to improve foot efficiency, helping improve lower limb alignment and reduce stress on the problem area, resulting in pain relief. If you think you could benefit from orthotics or would just like a no obligation consultation to fine out more, we offer free foot assessments at our clinic in Chandlers Ford.

Just give us a call to book your free consultation on 023 8025 3317.