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Physical Activity For Adults – New Guidelines

Posted on 9th September 2019 by

A new report from the Chief Medical Officers in the UK has just been published, on the amount and type of physical activity people should be doing to improve their health.

Physical Activity Adults goPhysio

Make a start TODAY. It’s never too late.

Physical activity will help you by:

  • Benefitting your health
  • Improving your sleep
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Managing stress
  • Improving your quality of life

Some is good, more is better.

Physical activity can help reduce the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, falls, depression, joint and back pain and a number of cancers, including colon and breast cancer. So, why wouldn’t you choose to be more active?!

The new guidelines have 4 very simple & easy to follow principles:

  1. Be active; either 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity a week
  2. Minimise sedentary time (in other words, don’t sit around so much!)
  3. Build strength on at least 2 days a week. This doesn’t have to be power lifting at a gym, daily activities that make demands on you like carrying heavy shopping bags counts too!
  4. As you get older,, include activities to help improve your balance 2 days a week.

Every minute counts.

How can we help you with meeting these guidelines?

At the core of what we do, we help you recover quickly from any pain or injury that might otherwise stop you from being so active. This is so important, the impact that having an injury can have on your physical activity levels over time can be really underestimated.

We also offer a huge range of activities that help you be active!

If you’re later in your life, our Positive Steps exercise classes are a great way for you to work on the all important strength & balance activities in a fun, friendly and supportive environment. They are run every Tuesday and Wednesday morning, just £12.50 a class. Try your first class for free to find out what it’s like! We also offer clinical Pilates classes, exercise based rehab and workshops, such as our monthly foam roller workshop.

Interested in finding out more? Give us a call on 023 8025 3317, we love to chat and find out how we can help you!



Back To School Pilates Offer

Posted on 20th August 2019 by

It’s coming to the end of the school holidays, time to start thinking about YOU again!

September can be a great time to start something new, it’s a time of natural change and fresh starts, new timetables and schedules. Maybe you have more free time for yourself with a little one starting school or gaining more independence going to senior school or college, or even university!

Have you thought about starting or re-starting Pilates? Perhaps you used to do Pilates and would love to get back to it? Pilates is a fantastic form of exercise. It’s a whole body workout, helping you get stronger, leaner, more flexible and helping you invest in your health. Even better, it’s sociable and fun!

We’ve got a very special offer for you and a friend!

What’s the offer?

For the total price of £300, you and your friend will both recieve:

  1. A 30 minute 1-2-1 Pilates session to get you started
  2. 3 consecutive months of Pilates classes, with a dedicated space every week in your chosen class from our timetable
  3. A pair of Pilates socks
  4. Access to our special Pilates membership (5% discount off all services, special offer of the month, monthly Pilates newsletter with exercises for home practice)
  5. The option to continue Pilates at a special reduced monthly rate of £55/month (normally £60/month).

That’s £300 between you – so only £150 each! A saving of over £150 off our normal price. If you haven’t got a friend to join you, you can pay £150 for an individual package.

We only have 10 of these special offers available, so be quick, once they’re gone they’re gone.

Read more about our range of specialist Pilates classes here. You can also take a look at our timetable.

Our Pilates classes offer:

  • 20 classes a week for all abilities
  • A dedicated place in your chosen class every week
  • A ‘make up’ class system, so you don’t loose any missed classes
  • Small classes, so you get individual attention and guidance
  • Clinically trained Instructors, specialists in helping and preventing injuries (with on hand advice every week!)
  • A spacious, fully equipped, air conditioned studio

To take advantage of this offer, please call us on 023 8025 3317 to have a chat, book your 1-2-1’s and find out what classes we have spaces in.

T&Cs

  • Offer only open to new members, existing members do not qualify for this offer
  • Payment of £300 for 2 people (or £150 for 1 person) is to be taken upfront. This is non refundable
  • Offer expires 30th November 2019
  • 3 month’s of classes include September, October and November 2019
  • Any unattended classes can not be carried over, however, you can ‘make up’ unattended classes as long as 24 hours notice is given
  • Classes are non-transferable


Osteoarthritis & How Pilates Can Help You

Posted on 1st August 2019 by

Osteoarthritis (OA) affects over 10 million people in the UK alone. OA can cause joint pain and discomfort where the smooth surface of the joints wears away over time, often referred to as “wear and tear”. Knees and hips are 2 of the most commonly affected joints.

Pilates for arthritis

If you have pain caused by OA, you can enter a bit of a negative cycle, where your pain stops you being so active or makes you fearful of activity, you move and exercise less and your muscles become weaker and your joints stiffer. This in turn can cause your more symptoms.

However, research has shown that exercise is the most effective non-drug treatment for reducing pain and increasing movement in patients with OA.

What this means is that it is perfectly safe and in fact, highly recommend to continue exercising and being active, even when you have pain or stiffness with your OA. If you’ve never exercised, starting activities that will strengthen your muscles will be extremely helpful.

Pilates is an excellent choice of exercise for people who have OA, as it is a gentle, low impact-based exercise, that combines weight-bearing with range of movement and strengthening exercises. Pilates can also be adapted to suit each person, tailoring the exercises to each person’s abilities within the limits of their movement and pain.

By having stronger muscles supporting the joints, you will be able to move and function more efficiently, which longer term will reduce the level of pain and discomfort you may experience. Over time, you may find that this has an impact on other activities, such as walking further or being able to climb the stairs more comfortably.

Physio and Pilates Instructor Kim, has put together some beginner level Pilates exercises you could try if you have OA in your knees or hips.

#1 Clam Level 1

  1. Lie on your side with your shoulders and hips stacked, with your underneath arm outstretched in alignment with your trunk. Ensure your back is in neutral and your centre is engaged. Bend your hips to approx.45 degrees and bend your knees to 90 degrees.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, lift the top knee upwards keeping the feet together.
  4. INHALE, lower the top knee onto the bottom leg.
  5. Repeat on the other side.

#2 Hip Twist Level 2

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre engaged.
  2. Place your arms out to the sides just below shoulder height, palms facing upwards. Connect your legs together and hold a small block or light book between your knees.
  3. INHALE to prepare.
  4. EXHALE, roll both knees to the right, continue to roll your pelvis, waist and then lower back towards the right. Finally, roll your head and neck towards your opposite shoulder, keeping your neck long.
  5. INHALE and hold.
  6. EXHALE, roll your head and neck back to the midline. Finally, roll your lower back, waist, pelvis and then legs back towards the midline.
  7. Repeat alternating sides.

#3 One Leg Stretch Level 1

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre Engaged.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, slide your left heel forwards along the floor.
  4. INHALE, slide your left heel back along the floor.
  5. Repeat alternating legs.

#4 Scissors Level 1

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre Engaged.
  2. INHALE to prepare.
  3. EXHALE, slide your right foot inwards towards your sitting bone and float this leg into tabletop.
  4. INHALE and hold the tabletop position.
  5. EXHALE, lower your right leg to the mat.
  6. Repeat alternating legs.

If you have OA and would like some guidance and support on exercising, getting more active and what it’s recommended you do to help you be active with OA, please give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to have a chat.


Getting On The Ball With Pilates

Posted on 1st July 2019 by

This month, Physio and Pilates Instructor, Kim, has chosen her top 5 Pilates exercises you can do with an exercise ball.

We will often bring the ball into our Pilates classes. It adds another dimension and an extra challenge with it’s natural instability. You can pick one up online or in shops such as TK Max, Argos or Sports Direct (just make sure it’s an anti-burst one!).

#1 Scissors in Sitting

  1. Sit up tall on your sitting bones on top of the ball. Position your feet slightly wider than hip-width apart. Balance your weight evenly through each foot. Relax your arms by your sides or place them on the brim of your pelvis.
  2. Lift your right leg and hold keeping your weight even through your sitting bone.
  3. Lower your leg and foot to the floor and repeat on the opposite leg.

#2 Swimming Level 3

  1. Kneel in front of the ball. Gently walk your hands forwards along the floor until your pelvis is resting in top of the ball. Balance with your fingertips and toes on the mat. Align your pelvis in the neutral position and gently set your centre.
  2. Simultaneously lengthen and hover your right arm and left leg from the mat.
  3. Hold and then lower your arm and leg to the mat.
  4. Repeat alternating sides.

#3 Bridge Hip Dips

  1. Sit on top of the ball and engage your centre. Slowly walk your feet forwards and lower your back until you are in the bridge position. Support your head, neck and upper back on the ball. Bend your knees to 90 degrees. Keep your centre engaged and gently engage your gluteal (buttock) muscles.
  2. Stabilise in the bridge position.
  3. Lower your hips and pelvis downwards without arching your lower back.
  4. Lift your hips and pelvis returning to the bridge position.

#4 Shoulder Bridge Level 1

  1. Lie on your back with your legs in the tabletop position, resting on top of the ball. Position your hips knees and ankles into parallel lines. Align your pelvis into the neutral position.
  2. Gently roll your pelvis and peel your spine away from the mat, one segment at a time rolling up to rest on your shoulder blades.
  3. Hold the shoulder bridge position.
  4. Roll your spine back down on to the mat, one vertebrae at a time to return to the neutral pelvic position.

#5 Plank Walks

  1.  Kneel in front of the ball. Gently walk your hands forwards along the floor until your pelvis is resting in top of the ball. Balance with your fingertips and toes on the mat. Align your pelvis in the neutral position and gently set your centre.
  2. Walk your hands further forwards along the floor. Simultaneously, lengthen your legs and lift your feet off the floor. Your body will align into the ’plank position’ where your spine and legs form a horizontal line. Only walk out as far as you can control.
  3. Hold the plank position.
  4. Walk your hands back along the floor and lower your toes to the floor, keeping your arms and legs long.

Read More 

We have lot’s of informative and educational Pilates articles over on our blog, which you can find here

If you’re interested in finding out more about joining our specialist Clinical Pilates classes at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, take a look at the details of what we offer, our timetable of over 20 classes a week and more information about getting started with Pilates.


Pilates: It’s more than the core!

Posted on 1st July 2019 by

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“You need to strengthen your core!”

“You’ve got a weak core!”

“Pilates will help your core!”

Sound familiar? Particularly if you’ve ever had back pain, these may be comments or messages you’ve heard quite frequently.

The buzz of ‘the core’ started back in the 1990’s, when targeted exercises towards the deep core muscles were thought to be the best way to help with back pain. It was thought that low back pain may have been caused by weak deep core muscles and that by working and ‘strengthening’ the core muscles, you could help back pain. Therapists and exercise pro’s leapt on this ‘theory’ and you will still read and hear people talking about this all the time, despite there being no link ever having been found between back pain and core muscle ‘strength’!

The current thinking and evidence surrounding ways to both prevent and help people with back pain (an in fact many other common injuries, aches, pains and long-standing conditions) is that it’s movement, activity and any exercise is the best way! The key is that you find something you enjoy, fit’s in with your daily life, you can commit to regularly and that challenges your body in some way.

There is a common misconception that all Pilates exercises do is work your ‘core’.

But there’s a lot more to Pilates than the core!

So, although Pilates exercises will focus around exercising your ‘core’ tummy and back muscles, doing Pilates exercises will also work and benefit your body in many other ways! This makes it a fantastic form of exercise if you do have back pain, a long-standing condition such as arthritis or other aches and pains.

A Pilates class will challenge and work on:

  • Your balance and flexibility
  • Strength in your arm and leg muscles
  • Breathing techniques
  • Movement and body awareness – so becoming aware of your posture and how your body moves and rests, important in helping you be mindful of your body and connecting with it
  • Relaxation and time invested in you
  • Co-ordination

Our specialist classes here at goPhysio will further support you, by providing access and support from our dedicated team of Clinical Instructors – so you can be rest assured you will be in great hands! Being Clinicians, our team can integrate their knowledge and experience of not only how the body works and moves, but also injuries, aches, pains & MSK conditions for which you might need specific support.

Read More

Pilates at goPhysio

Pilates Articles


Meet Your Team, Hello Roz!

Posted on 24th June 2019 by

As our team has grown over the last year or so, we thought it would be a great time to introduce you to the team that we have to help you, re-introducing the more familiar faces and welcoming the new ones!

Roz Brawn - Physiotherapist & Level 2 APPI Pilates Instructor

Today we meet Physiotherapist & Pilates Instructor, Roz.

What are your clinical qualifications?

I studied a BSc Sports Science initially at Loughborough University, graduating in 1993 before going on to study Physiotherapy at Birmingham University, where I qualified in 1997.

What areas have you previously worked in?

My career started in the NHS and I then went to work in Australia as a Physio in private practice for 4 years. On returning to the UK, I spent time working in the private sector alongside working with the Hampshire County Cricket Team. For 8 years I worked with the English Institute of Sport, including being the full time Physiotherapist to the GB Rowing Team, GB Diving Team and GB Synchro Swimming Team. I have also worked as a part time physio for the GB Gymnastics Team.

Do you have any special areas of interest in physiotherapy?

Unsurprisingly, given my sporting experience, I am interested in working with sports injuries, particularly hip and back issues. I am a member of the ACPSEM. I also enjoy rehab after spinal surgery or fractures.

I have specialist qualifications in using acupuncture and am a member of the AACP, and IASTM (read more about what IASTM is here!).

I am also a Level 2 APPI Pilates Instructor and Pilates Reformer Instructor.

What you’re most proud of?

Being part of Team GB at the Olympic Games and seeing the athletes that had worked so hard achieve their goals and dreams knowing that I had played a part to enable that journey to be completed.

What’s the best thing about being part of the goPhysio team? 

Being part of a supportive team of people all with different backgrounds, knowledge and skills who are open to sharing those skills and supporting each other.

We asked………

If you could invite any 3 people in the world round for dinner, who would they be?

  • David Attenborough
  • Nelson Mandela
  • Ben Fogle

Where in the world is top of your list to visit?

Thailand

If you were going to space and could only take 1 thing, what would it be?

A photo album

What’s the 1 thing that may surprise people about you? 

 I drove a 4WD vehicle from Australia to England!


Roz works at goPhysio from Tuesday – Friday. If you’d like to book an appointment to see Roz, you can give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or book an appointment online here.


5 Elements of Posture and how Pilates can help

Posted on 1st June 2019 by

Having an awareness of your body and posture is a great way to help maintain a healthy, well-functioning body.  Sustained postures that your body isn’t used to or a lack of awareness of how your body feels in certain positions can lead to low back pain, neck pain, headaches, injuries, shortness of breath and even digestive problems. Being aware of your posture can help with maintaining the body’s natural spinal curves, reducing muscle tension and improving movement.

The APPI (Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates institute) method of Pilates taught at goPhysio is based on 5 key elements which are the focus of postural awareness:

5 Elements of Posture How Pilates helps
  1. Breathing
  2. Centering (engaging the core muscles whilst maintaining the neutral spine)
  3. Rib cage alignment
  4. Shoulder blade placement
  5. Head and neck position

Through these 5 key elements, Pilates can really help us become more aware of and in tune with our body. Ultimately, this can help encourage us to move more, move better and prevent injuries from occurring.

Whether you work at beginner or advanced level, Pilates exercises focus on maintaining an optimum postural position throughout all exercises regardless of the specific muscle group a particular exercise may be targeting.  Always looking for optimal alignment and movement control of the pelvis, spine, ribcage, shoulders and head whilst maintaining good breathing patterns. With practice, this is transferred through into daily life as you are moving around.


Top 5 Pilates Exercises for your Abdominals

Posted on 1st March 2019 by

The abdominal (or tummy muscles) play a key feature in Pilates. ‘Setting the core‘ is often a starting point for many exercises.

The great thing about Pilates based abdominal exercises are that the movements are slow, considered and controlled. They very much focus on ‘quality’ movement, making sure you’re aware of your lower back, which, if you’ve ever experienced low back pain, is really important.

These 5 exercises that focus on your tummy area can help ease and prevent aches and pains around the back, hips and pelvis,

#1 Scissors

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre Engaged.
  2. Float your legs one at a time into the tabletop position (hips and knees bent to 90 degrees).
  3. Hold this double tabletop position, so both of your legs are bent up.
  4. Lower your left leg and tap the tips of your toes on the mat and then float the leg back up into the tabletop position.
  5. Lower your right leg and tap the tips of your toes on the mat and then float this leg back into tabletop.
  6. Repeat alternating legs.

#2 Hip Twist

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre engaged.
  2. Float your leg up into tabletop.
  3. Keeping your leg in tabletop, glide this leg outwards from your hip joint.
  4. Draw this leg back in again until your knee is directly above your hip.
  5. Repeat on alternate legs.

#3 Abdominal Prep

  1. Start in the Pilates rest position with your hands interconnected and placed behind the top of the neck to support the head. Elbows slightly lifted away from the floor, shoulders drawn down and in.
  2. Slide your ribcage downwards towards your waist to lift your head, neck and shoulders off the mat whilst maintaining the neutral spine position.
  3. Hold and then lower to the mat.

#4 Half Roll Back

  1. Sit on the mat with your legs in front, hip-distance apart. Bend your hips and knees a little.
  2. Roll off the back of your sitting bones and round your spine into a deep C-shaped curve from the crown of the head to the tailbone. Arms long, reaching forwards parallel to the floor.
  3. Scoop your tailbone upwards towards the ceiling and roll further back-wards off your sitting bones to round your pelvis and lower towards the mat behind you.
  4. Roll your body forwards to the starting position, moving from your pelvis.

#5 Criss Cross

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent up in the Pilates Rest Position. Legs hip width apart, shoulders drawn down and in and your neck long. Centre engaged.
  2. Float both legs one at a time into the tabletop position. Fold your hands one on another and place them at the base of your head for support. Lift your elbows into your peripheral vision. Then scoop your upper body into the abdo. prep. position.
  3. Reach your right leg forwards and upwards on a diagonal. Simultaneously, reach your right shoulder blade diagonally across towards your left hip, keeping the upper body lifted. Allow your head and neck to follow the diagonal movement of your upper body.
  4. Alternate legs and rotate your upper body to the right, reaching your left shoulder blade towards your right hip. Keep the upper body lifted throughout.
  5. Repeat alternating legs with rotation of your upper body. Keep your upper body lifted.

Although at first glance these exercises may not seem too challenging, when performed correctly, they may surprise you!

Read More

We have lot’s of informative and educational Pilates articles over on our blog, which you can find here.

If you’re interested in finding out more about joining our specialist Clinical Pilates classes at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, take a look at the details of what we offer, our timetable of over 20 classes a week and more information about getting started with Pilates.

#LovePilates



A pain in the neck? Not with Pilates

Posted on 1st March 2019 by

The average weight of the human head is 4.5-5.0kg.  It is therefore no surprise that with this weight at the top of our bodies, how your neck moves and works, the positions that are demanded of it and the support it has, can play a part in problems experienced with neck pain and headaches.

However, the neck can not be considered in isolation. The position of the head at the top of the spine is also influenced by the alignment of the whole spine.

Stress on the cervical spine as related to posture. (From: Hansraj, K. K. (2014). Assessment of stresses in the cervical spine caused by posture and position of the headSurgical technology international25, 277-279.)

What’s great about Pilates, is that it can assist with maintaining the natural curves of the spine, including the neck, by increasing conscious awareness of posture and by strengthening the deep muscles that play in important part in supporting your body well.

Breathing patterns are also a fundamental part of Pilates and by achieving correct breath control and ‘diaphragmatic breathing’ we can ‘switch off’ the neck muscles that are often overactive with breathing and a component of causing neck pain.

Pilates can therefore help with neck pain by improving spinal alignment, strengthening deep stabilising muscles, relaxing overactive muscles, reducing tension and improving range of movement.

Read More

10 Ways to keep your neck pain under control


Bringing Pilates Into Everyday Life

Posted on 1st February 2019 by

Pilates is a great form of low impact exercise to help strengthen your core muscles, improve your posture and help to keep you flexible and mobile. Whilst doing a class once a week is a great start, you can bring some of the key elements of Pilates into your daily life to get even more benefit from Pilates.

Here are five ways you can bring Pilates into your everyday life:

#1 Engage your core

This isn’t just for Pilates classes! Keeping your core gently engaged through the day when you are moving around is a great way to further strengthen your core. Practice makes perfect! Try engaging your core before you get out of bed in the morning, before climbing a flight of stairs or before bending down to reach into a cupboard. Read more about this key building block of Pilates here.

#2 Move correctly

Pilates classes involve a series of slow, well controlled movements. Take this principle and apply it to all your movements, thinking about moving in a more purposeful and controlled manner, rather than rushing from A to B with no thought! Avoid any sudden or jerky movements and aim for smooth stable movements. Think quality of movement from the cues you might have picked up in your classes.

#3 Be Mindful of Your Posture

Imagine you have a helium balloon attached to the top of your head, pulling your spine up tall to stop you slouching. Think about sliding your shoulder blades back and down into your back pockets to open your chest and keep your upper back strong. Tuck your chin in slightly and keep the back of your neck long. If you work in an office and spend a lot of time sitting or in 1 position for long periods of time, you can start to feel the effects – by keeping these principles in mind you’ll be more productive and feel less achy at the end of the day! 

#4 Keep breathing

Try bringing some Pilates style breathing into your day – place your hands on your ribs and take a deep breath in, filling and expanding your lungs all the way to the base. Hold the breath for a moment and then exhale, pushing all the air out your lungs. Repeat 3-5 times. This is a great way to bring some calm or clarity to a busy day!

#5 Stretch it out

Start or finish your day with some basic Pilates stretches to get your body warmed up for the day ahead or cooled down after a long day. Try a ‘Cat Stretch’ on all fours to get your spine moving and then take it into a ‘Thread the Needle’ to get some rotational movement. Use a ‘Childs Pose’ or ‘Shell Stretch’ to relax and unwind at the end of the day.