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Runners – We Need Your Help!

Posted on 27th February 2018 by

We are trying to find out more about what injured runners do to get back to pain-free running, and would love to hear from you! If you’re interested in helping us out, please take a few moments to answer a couple of questions by clicking here. Many thanks.

The Injured Runner Project


Cut out the middle man

Posted on 1st February 2018 by

In a recent survey we carried out of the people attending our clinic, we found their key frustrations when dealing with health care providers wasPhysiotherapy self referral

  1. Having to wait for an appointment
  2. Availability of appointments

Thankfully, there’s a way forward. Self referral. With physiotherapist being the experts in effectively diagnosing and treating a huge range of painful conditions; from back pain to calf tears, post surgical recovery to sports injuries, arthritis to growing pains. For musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries, a physiotherapist is your best first point of call. Regulated medical practitioners in their own right, you don’t need to be referred by a middle man – you can refer yourself.

So many people still see their GPs as the ‘gate keepers’ to their care, and in many instances this still holds true. But with MSK injuries, this in’t always the best way. If you have an MSK pain or injury, seeing your GP first will only result in the following:

  1. Waiting time to see your GP, which can be weeks if it’s not urgent
  2. Taking time off work to see your GP during their opening hours
  3. A brief consultation with your GP, who will often recommend resting and/or medication as a first line of action
  4. Possibly referral to an NHS Physiotherapist, which again can be weeks if not months

So, whats the alternative if you’ve got an MSK injury? You can pick up the phone from 8am 6 days a week (until 8pm Monday – Thursday) or hop onto your computer 24/7 and book online to see one of our specialists.

The result

  • You’ll get an appointment to see one of our experts, normally within 24 hours if not the same day
  • You’ll come away with a diagnosis and pro-active treatment plan to resolve your individual injury tailored around your lifestyle
  • You’ll be back doing what you love doing, free from pain, quickly

So, not only does this save you lot’s of angst, worry, waiting and frustration, it significantly helps reduce the burden on the NHS, freeing up their resources to help ‘sick’ people. Your GP does not have to be the ‘middle man’, you can refer yourself directly to physiotherapy.

“GP’s are not hands on when making a diagnosis and lack expertise in different areas – no reflection on GPs, but they are not the experts”

Mrs P, goPhysio Patient, January 2018




Running injury? When to get help and who to see!

Posted on 18th January 2018 by

Injuries are part and parcel of sport, exercise and running. But when is it OK to manage the injury yourself and when do you need to get help?

Firstly, our bodies are designed to heal naturally from injury over a period of a few weeks, depending on the severity of the injury and nature of the condition.

However, being sensible is the key. If we fall and suddenly we have a swollen, painful, red/bruised limb, then we should seek immediate attention in A&E or a walk in centre. If you’re unsure which to use, calling 111 to get a healthcare professional to help you with all your enquiries.

However, if you’re suffering with a less severe or ongoing overuse injury in your soft tissues (muscle, tendon, ligaments) or joints, which is taking a long time to settle i.e. lower back pain, knee pain, or a sports injury,  then seeing your G.P. or a Physiotherapist, is your best option.

Unfortunately, the reality waiting to see your GP if you’ve got an injury only serves to delay your recovery. Most will advise rest in the first instance and maybe painkillers, and ask you to come back in 6 weeks if it isn’t better (sound familiar?). Have a look at a previous blog post we wrote ‘The magic 6 weeks‘.

Eventually they may refer you to an NHS physio, and there’ll be more waiting for an appointment, which can be up to 18 weeks or more locally! That’s 6 months plus of potential pain, suffering and not doing some of the things you enjoy.

However, most private Physio’s accept direct referrals, minimising any hold ups in your treatment, giving you peace of mind and a positive action plan, without any delays. Clinically, physiotherapy is justified from day 1 of an injury – competitive and elite sports men and women will have immediate physio.

However, for the general population, the ideal time to see a physiotherapist will depend on the severity and nature of your condition and your aims and goals.

If you have a severe painful injury that stops you from running (or exercising) and you’re due to run a marathon event in 4 weeks – immediate Physio is crucial.

If an injury stops you from going to work and you’re self employed – immediate physio is highly cost effective! We see so many people that can’t work because of an injury and if they aren’t getting paid, the cost of private treatment to get them back to work quicker is actually very cost effective.

If you have minor injury that is improving steadily, you can avoid the aggravating factors and don’t mind not being so active for a while, then you could attempt to self treat your injury. However, with this comes the potential risk of re-injury when you return to the causative activities.

If your injury isn’t improving and you want to get back to a high level of activity, i.e. golf x 2 weekly or gardening, then Physio is important to help you return to your activities and prevent re-injury.

There’s an old, well known saying “time is the best healer”, but where injury is concerned, this is a myth!

Essentially, if your injury is not improving within 5-7 days, you need to see an adequately qualified and experienced physiotherapist. The longer you delay seeing someone, taking the ‘wait & see approach’, the longer it will take you to get better and the more it will cost you in pain, effort, time, money and frustration at not doing the things you enjoy.

Who to see?

We understand there’s an overwhelming choice of healthcare providers and it can be a stressful experience choosing which therapy or clinic is best for you. The lines between different therapies are merging, making your choice of therapy and clinic more complex as Chiropractor’s give exercises, Physio’s do manipulations and Personal Trainers do rehabilitation.

From your perspective we’re all the same – you just want to see someone who can get you better! A good clue when deciding which profession to see, is to consider who the professionals use to look after their bodies? In professional sports, from cycling to football, rugby to the Olympics, it’s a Chartered Physiotherapist that is trusted to sort out injuries, they’re the ones you’ll see run out onto the pitch. There’s obviously a good reason for this. Physiotherapy is also the 3rd largest health profession in the UK after Doctors and Nurses.

Physiotherapy is a proven strategy for in the first instance, easing the worries and concerns of people suffering from aches, pain and stiffness. And then helping that person move freely again, bending further, stretching easier, feeling healthier and stronger and living an active, fulfilled lifestyle into their 40’s, 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and beyond.

Here at goPhysio we will offer you an appointment within 24 hours of you getting in touch. It’s YOU that matters and for that reason our care is focused on listening to you, solving your injury problems and achieving your goals.

The sooner you take the time and effort to invest in your health and wellbeing with physiotherapy, you’ll be back doing all the things you enjoy.

If you need a solution to your running injury, don’t delay – you can book your appointment online here now.


1 Year In Our New Home – Celebratory Offers!

Posted on 11th December 2017 by

Celebrating 1 year at goPhysio Chandlers Ford

On the 19th December, it’ll be a year since we opened the doors to our new Physiotherapy, Health & Wellbeing Clinic in Chandlers Ford. What a year it’s been!

We dreamed for so long of having a space designed around our years of experience, knowing exactly what we needed to support people to recover from and prevent pains and injuries, helping people live a healthy, active, positive life, pain and injury free. The clinic has certainly provided this space and some.

To celebrate this milestone, we have a special raffle giveaway, with a chance to win some great prizes!

You have 2 ways to enter into our raffle with the chance to WIN one of the following Vouchers:

  • Three x 1 hour sports massages worth £165!
  • An initial Sports Therapy assessment and 1 follow up session worth £116!
  • A small group Pilates session for you and up to 3 friends worth £100!
  • An Initial Physiotherapy injury assessment worth £68!
  • A place in our new foam roller workshop worth £25!

First Way – If you’re on Facebook, all YOU need to do is:
1. LIKE our goPhysio Facebook page
2. LIKE the giveaway post
3. SHARE the giveaway post
4. COMMENT on the post – telling us why you’d love one of these vouchers  or tag someone you think does!

You’ll need to do all 4 things to be entered into our raffle.

Alternative Way – If you’re not on Facebook, you can also enter by leaving us a Google Review here. Just click on ‘Write a Review‘ on the right box, towards the bottom of the box, and leave us a review about your experiences at goPhysio. All reviews submitted by midnight on 18th December will be entered into the raffle.

5 LUCKY winners will be drawn on our 1 year anniversary, Tuesday 19th December and announced over on Facebook! The winners will need to come into the clinic to collect their voucher.



  1. The promoter is: goPhysio Ltd.
  2. The competition is open to residents of the United Kingdom aged 18 years or over except employees of goPhysio and their close relatives and anyone otherwise connected with the organisation or judging of the competition.
  3. There is no entry fee and no purchase necessary to enter this competition.
  4. By entering this competition, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  5. Route to entry for the competition and details of how to enter are outlined above.
  6. Only one entry will be accepted per person. Multiple entries from the same person will be disqualified.
  7. Closing date for entry will be 18th December 2017. After this date the no further entries to the competition will be permitted.
  8. No responsibility can be accepted for entries not received for whatever reason.
  9. The promoter reserves the right to cancel or amend the competition and these terms and conditions without notice in the event of a catastrophe, war, civil or military disturbance, act of God or any actual or anticipated breach of any applicable law or regulation or any other event outside of the promoter’s control. Any changes to the competition will be notified to entrants as soon as possible by the promoter.
  10. The promoter is not responsible for inaccurate prize details supplied to any entrant by any third party connected with this competition.
  11. The prizes are outlined above.
  12. The prize is as stated and no cash or other alternatives will be offered. The prizes are not transferable. Prizes are subject to availability and we reserve the right to substitute any prize with another of equivalent value without giving notice.
  13. Winners will be chosen at random from all entries received and verified by Promoter.
  14. The winners will be notified on Facebook and/or letter within 28 days of the closing date. If the winner cannot be contacted or do not claim the prize within 14 days of notification, we reserve the right to withdraw the prize from the winner and pick a replacement winner.
  15. The prize can be collected from goPhysio’s clinic.
  16. The promoter’s decision in respect of all matters to do with the competition will be final and no correspondence will be entered into.
  17. By entering this competition, an entrant is indicating his/her agreement to be bound by these terms and conditions.
  18. The competition and these terms and conditions will be governed by [English] law and any disputes will be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of [England].
  19. The winner agrees to the use of his/her name and image in any publicity material, as well as their entry. Any personal data relating to the winner or any other entrants will be used solely in accordance with current [UK] data protection legislation and will not be disclosed to a third party without the entrant’s prior consent.
  20. This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook, Twitter or any other Social Network.
  21. goPhysio shall have the right, at its sole discretion and at any time, to change or modify these terms and conditions, such change shall be effective immediately upon posting to this webpage.
  22. goPhysio also reserves the right to cancel the competition if circumstances arise outside of its control.










Posted on 12th October 2017 by

What is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis is a condition that affects your joints, causing pain and stiffness. It’s by far the most common form of joint disease, affecting people all over the world and at least 8 million people in the UK.

What causes Osteoarthritis?

Almost anyone can get osteoarthritis but certain factors can increase your risk, for example if you’re in your late 40’s or older, you’re overweight or you’re female (for most joints, especially the knees and hands, osteoarthritis is more common and more severe in women).

What might Osteoarthritis feel like?

The main symptoms of osteoarthritis are:

Pain – The pain tends to be worse when you move your joint or at the end of the day. If you have severe osteoarthritis, you may feel pain more often.

Stiffness – Your joints may feel stiff after rest, but this usually wears off as you get moving.

A grating or grinding sensation (crepitus) – Your joint may creak or crunch as you move.

Swelling – The swelling may be hard (caused by osteophytes) or soft (caused by synovial thickening and extra fluid), and the muscles around your joint may look thin or wasted.

Not being able to use your joint normally – Your joint may not move as freely or as far as normal. Sometimes it may give way because your muscles have weakened or your joint has become less stable. Exercises to strengthen your muscles can help to prevent this.

Your symptoms will often vary for no clear reason. Some people find that changes in the weather make the pain worse, especially damp weather along with falling atmospheric pressure. Others find the pain varies depending on how active they’ve been. In more severe cases, the pain might not go away. It might stop you sleeping and cause difficulties in your daily activities.

There are some great resources on the Arthritis UK website, where these images are from. 

How do the symptoms of Osteoarthritis progress?

Symptoms of OA can vary. That may start severe but settle down or pain and stiffness can progress and worsen. What you do and how you manage your OA can really impact on the progression of symptoms. Keeping active and taking part in regular exercise is one of the best ways of helping your OA.

Possible complications of osteoarthritis include an increased risk of developing gout and chondrocalcinosis.

Gout is a common type of inflammatory arthritis, which is caused by high levels of urate that lead to sodium urate crystals forming in and around your joints. The changes that osteoarthritis causes in cartilage can encourage crystals to form within your joint. If you have both osteoarthritis and a high level of urate in your blood, you’re at an increased risk of developing gout.

Chondrocalcinosis or calcification is the formation of calcium pyrophosphate crystals in your cartilage. It can happen in any joint, with or without osteoarthritis, but it’s most likely to occur in a knee already affected by osteoarthritis, especially in older people.

How is Osteoarthritis diagnosed?

Osteoarthritis is usually diagnosed based on your symptoms and the physical signs that your doctor finds when examining your joints. this can include:

  • joint tenderness
  • creaking or grating (crepitus) sounds
  • bony swelling
  • excess fluid
  • reduced movement
  • joint instability
  • muscle thinning

X-rays are the most useful test to confirm osteoarthritis, although you probably won’t need one. They can’t really show how much pain or disability osteoarthritis is likely to cause. Some people have a lot of pain from fairly minor joint damage, while others have little pain from more severe damage.

Rarely, an MRI scan of your knee can be helpful. This will show the soft tissues (cartilage, tendons, muscles) and changes in your bone that can’t be seen on a standard x-ray

What is the best treatment for Osteoarthritis

Besides painkillers, steroid injections or surgery (when causing severe pain or mobility problems), the best treatment, according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), is exercise.

NICE recommendations include:

  • advising patients to participate in exercise as a ‘core treatment’
  • offering weight loss interventions for patients who are obese or overweight
  • providing patients with holistic assessments

Exercise can help to manage some of the symptoms of arthritis. As Physiotherapists we provide advice and education on exercise, pain relief and ways to manage your condition. We can teach you how to improve your joint movement and your walking, as well as how to strengthen your muscles.

When you see us at goPhysio, we will assess your problem and give you tailored advice and a treatment programme. This may include some hands on treatments, an exercise programme and modifications to your lifestyle.

Prognosis for Osteoarthritis

It’s impossible to predict how osteoarthritis will develop for any one person. It can sometimes develop over just a year or two and cause a lot of damage to your joint, which may then cause some deformity or disability. But more often osteoarthritis is a slow process that develops over many years and results in fairly small changes in just part of your joint. This doesn’t mean it won’t be painful, but it’s less likely to cause severe deformity or disability. Sometimes the condition reaches a peak a few years after the symptoms start and then remains the same, or it may even improve.

Read more

6 Arthritis myths

Arthritis – an overview

New exercise guide for people with arthritis

How can physiotherapy help arthritis?


Back Care Awareness Week – Back Pain in Education

Posted on 2nd October 2017 by

The annual Back Care Awareness Week, run by BackCare, the UK’s leading charity for those impacted by back or neck pain, is to take place between 2 and 6 October. The theme this year is Back Pain in Education.

Back pain is one of the top common causes of absence from work throughout the country. It costs the UK economy around £15 billion every year as over four million working days are lost as a result of the condition. Furthermore, about 80% of the UK population will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives.

BackCare decided it was important to run a campaign targeted at children and young people as many of the back and neck pain problems experienced by adults are due to them not looking after their backs during childhood and teenage years.

Back pain
The image here, that BackPain have promoted has the message ‘Don’t pick up heavy things’. There’s nothing wrong with picking up something heavy! In all our years as Physiotherapists, I don’t recall we’ve ever seen a young patient who’s injured their back by picking up something too heavy!

Dr Brian Hammond, the Chair of BackCare said: “Early teaching of children and young people of the importance of taking care of their backs is bound to have a positive effect on the health of their backs as adults.”

He added: “There are simple things children and young people can do, such as sitting properly and not for too long, exercising regularly, stretching and lifting correctly. They also need to know how to carry their school books and equipment in a way that does not harm their back or neck.”

Why we somewhat disagree with this years message!

However, leading Physiotherapists and the latest research will tend to disagree with some of the points raised in this campaign. Although we agree that education and empowering people with understanding and knowledge of taking care of their bodies from a young age is crucial, implying that they can damage their spines by doing normal, everyday tasks like carrying a school bag, is a myth. These messages can lead to an unnecessary fear, which can then progress into adulthood.

Research is suggesting that there isn’t a ‘perfect posture’ or ‘best way to carry a bag’. So implying that young children can ‘harm’ their back or neck in these ways isn’t a positive message to put across.

This image sums up perfectly how children should be caring for their backs – not focusing on correct postures or harmful habits – moving regularly!

Kids perfect posture

So what messages should we be sharing?

  • Exercise and movement is the key – youngsters should be encouraged and supported to take part in a wide variety of exercise, sport and activities that encourage regular, whole body movement that they enjoy! It doesn’t really matter what it is, but enjoyment and instilling a lifelong, love of being active is the best way to prevent developing any back problems.
  • Move regularly – our bodies aren’t designed to be still. It’s not the posture that’s the problem, but staying in single positions for too long that can lead to issues. So, when you read about issues such as ‘text neck’, it tends to be the duration that people are using their devices in, in a single, sustained position that can cause issues. If you held a so called ‘perfect posture’ for any sustained length of time, this could cause issues!
  • Don’t be afraid of pain – aches and pains can be a normal everyday occurrence. We can all feel a bit of stiffness, aching, muscle soreness etc. But pain doesn’t always equal damage. Particularly with back pain, being afraid of the pain tends to lead to us being overly protective, not moving as much, which in turn can cause more pain. It’s a vicious circle. As long as there are no indications to be concerned that something more serious is going on to cause the pain (trauma, pins & needles or numbness, problems going to the toilet, pain at night for example – if any of these are present, it’s advised to see your GP ASAP), then we need to install the confidence that the pain is OK.
  • Be careful with the language we use – particularly with children, the words we use if they’re in pain can be very influential. Negative words like harm, damage, out of place, torn, can all create very negative messages. We need to focus on positive messages like strong and active. Being overly focused on carrying things correctly at a young age, will install a fear that their backs aren’t designed to cope with such a normal, everyday, task – which ins’t true.

There are obviously times and instances when children do develop back or neck pain. This can be caused by sustained postures (often technology related) and a lack of exercise of general movement. In these cases, specific education and increasing their awareness is a key part of helping them overcome any pain they are experiencing. Postural education may be a part of this.

It’s great that BackCare are are raising awareness of back issues in this campaign, but let’s keep the messages positive and not install a fear into young people that their backs might not be fit for the job!







Physiotherapist or Sports Therapist?

Posted on 29th September 2017 by

Being able to offer a range of services and solutions to your injury problems all under one roof, is The Chartered Society of physiotherapists something we’re very proud to offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford.

This means a range of professionals who are best placed to help you with your injury concerns. We have a great team on board here and we often get asked;

“Who’s there best person to see? A Physiotherapist or Sports Therapist?

The short answer is, that both professionals are highly trained and experienced to treat your injury. The types of injuries people come to see us for here at goPhysio are called musculoskeletal (MSK) problems. So those issues affecting bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments etc. such as back pain, sports injuries, whiplash, overuse injuries and such. There are some key similarities and differences in their training and approach.

In this article we aim to explain more about these 2 professions, to help guide you to seeing the most appropriate person to get you back doing what you love.

Physio’s and Sports Therapists have both had to complete a degree or masters qualification at University, so are highly educated in assessing MSK problems and applying a wide range of treatments to effectively resolve your pain and injury. Both focus on restoring, maintaining and maximising movement alongside relieving the pain of your injury and optimising your quality of life.

Both Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists have the skills and knowledge to:

  • Assess and diagnose your MSK injury
  • Formulate and deliver customised and effective treatment and rehabilitation plans to optimise your recovery from injury
  • Use a variety of treatment techniques to relieve your pain and help resolve your injury
  • Educate and advise people on management of long term MSK conditions
  • Support you with getting active and staying fit and well
  • Get you back doing what you love, free from pain or injury
  • Help you improve physical performance
  • Prevent injury or recurring injuries


Physiotherapy is a healthcare profession, regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy are both protected titles, so individuals have to have completed an approved degree or masters course and meet and maintain strict standards set out by the HCPC in order to use this title.

Physiotherapy helps restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. Physiotherapists help people of all ages affected by injury, illness or disability through movement and exercise, manual therapy, education and advice. The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists

During their training, Physiotherapists will learn how to manage a variety of different conditions associated with different systems of the body and different client groups. This includes orthopaedics, neurology, cardiovascular, respiratory, elderly, children and women’s health. Once they are qualified, they may choose to specialise in any one of these areas and work in a variety of settings such as hospitals, schools, sports clubs, private clinics and industry. Subsequently, they have a very wide and varied knowledge base and experience.

Sports Therapy

Sports Therapists are experts in musculoskeletal disorders. Their degree course focuses on the musculoskeletal system and treating pain and injury throughs hands on treatments and rehabilitation.

Sports Therapy is an aspect of healthcare that is specifically concerned with the prevention of injury and the rehabilitation of the patient back to optimum levels of functional, occupational and sports specific fitness, regardless of age and ability. It utilises the principles of sport and exercise sciences incorporating physiological and pathological processes to prepare the participant for training, competition and where applicable, work. The Society of Sports Therapists 

Despite the name, Sports Therapists don’t just see people with sports injuries. At the end of the day, an injury is an injury, however you’ve suffered it. Whether you’ve sprained your ankle out shopping or playing football, a Sports Therapist is well equipped to help you.

In Summary

  • Both Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists are trained to a high level to expertly assess, diagnose and help with your injury recovery.
  • Physiotherapists have a broad based training, so if you have a more complex history or other medical conditions, that need to be considered, they may be the better person to see.
  • Sports Therapists will be well equipped to support your full return to sport, focusing very much on rehabilitation and high level exercise if this is your goal.

Both professions will have taken different paths after graduating, so you may find a Sports Therapist who’s taken a less ‘sporty’ path in their profession, just as you may find a Physio who’s specialised in sports. So, be guided by your needs and the individual experience of the clinicians available to see.

The important thing is, that your form a good relationship with your Clinician, you can communicate with them well and you feel the benefit from their treatment programme and plan.

If you’d like further advice who to see for your injury, then please do get in touch.



Open Day Success!

Posted on 19th September 2017 by

We had a fantastic day on Saturday, as we welcomed so many people through our doors to experience many of the different services we have on offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, meet our team and find out more about our lifesaving defibrillator.

Visitors on the day took part in Pilates classes, our Active Backs classes for people who want to gain confidence again exercising with back pain, Positive Steps classes for the later years of life and Yoga with Marianne.

We were also delighted to offer free sports massage taster sessions, free injury advice clinics with our Physiotherapists & Sports Therapists and carried out lots of computerised foot analyses.

Linda, a local community first responder, kindly offered some basic CPR training and dispelled many myths about using a public access defibrillator.

It was wonderful meeting so many local people. Thank you for your support!

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open DaygoPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day









Be Well

Posted on 15th September 2017 by

Be well goPhysioMany of us reach a point where we no longer feel so ‘young’. We start to feel aches and pains, we start to gain weight more easily, exercising becomes more challenging and energy levels can be harder to maintain.

People can reach that point at different times, some whilst still young, some not until they are much older, some maybe never or when it’s almost too late and our body can’t cope anymore.

I watched the BBC’s How to stay young programme this week. In this series, Angela Rippon and Dr Chris van Tulleken team up with scientists to turn back the clock on a group of volunteers, showing what can be done to reverse the ageing process. Over the course of three months, the volunteers are put through a variety of tests and placed on a lifestyle plan to turn back the clock on ageing, but will it work? Can they reverse their body age?

The answer is, yes! 

And it really is quite simple. There are 4 basic pillars to keeping well……….

  • Eat well
  • Move well
  • Relax well
  • Sleep well

Easier said than done, but if you can follow those 4 pillars above most of the time, you’ll be giving yourself a fighting chance of living a long, healthy life!

Here at goPhysio, we help play a key part in the moving pillar. ‘Move well’ can mean both exercising regularly to optimise physical health but also dealing with pain and injury so you can keep moving. Research suggests that the more we move, the better. So it doesn’t have to be about hard core exercise (although high intensity exercise has many benefits), integrating moving regularly throughout the day is essential.

Quality of movement is also an important consideration. You can easily develop habits or weaknesses that affect your quality of movement. Over time your body can compensate and areas can start to complain – one of the reasons you can pick up injuries or feel pain.

As a team of movement experts, our Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists are well versed in making sure you can move your body well. That can mean assessing your movement to find out what may not be moving as it should, re-educating how you move to address any issues, utilising movement as a way of recovering from injury and teaching your body to move effectively and efficiently, through exercises such as Pilates.

If you need some help and guidance on how to move well, give us a call to book in and see one of our experts.