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Welcome to the team Jack!

Posted on 20th April 2017 by

Jack Hughes Physiotherapist Following on from his work in professional football, Jack moved to the south of England in April 2017 to join the team at goPhysio.

Since graduating from Cardiff University with a degree in Physiotherapy, Jack has placed a huge emphasis on the prevention of injury and re-injury, using sound medical, sports science and strength & conditioning principles that are specific to the individual.

In doing so, he has helped to rehabilitate an array of musculoskeletal conditions in a variety of settings.

Jack likes to practise what he preaches by throwing weights around a gym and playing a number of sports.

 


Congratulations Kim & Dan!

Posted on 5th February 2017 by

Our team were delighted to join Physio Kim at the weekend to celebrate her marriage to Dan in Cambridge. Kim looked stunning and it was a beautiful (and perfectly planned) occasion! Congratulations to Kim & Dan x

 

 


 


goPhysio FAQs: Do I have to see my GP first?

Posted on 26th October 2016 by

Following in our FAQ series, today we address a commonly asked question, do I need to see my GP goPhysio FAQbefore I come to physio? 

The good news is, no, you don’t. You can decide yourself that you’d benefit from physio and just give us a call to make an appointment or book an appointment online.

Having to go to see your GP is a fairly traditional route. More often than not, for a mild to moderate musculoskeletal (MSK) injury, they’ll just advise you rest and take painkillers for 6 weeks anyway. To be referred to NHS physio, you’re likely to still need to see your GP first. However, there is even a move now in GP surgeries to have physiotherapists as the first point of contact for MSK injuries. Given that consultations for MSK conditions make up an estimated 30% of a GP’s caseload, having physiotherapist take over this role is great!

So, if you have a sprain, back pain, sports injury, neck problems, postural issues, muscular or ligament injury – anything affecting your muscles, bones, joints, you can come directly to see us. This saves you precious time and delays in your recovery so you can get back doing what you want to be doing.


Meet Our Physiotherapist Kim McCreith

Posted on 26th July 2016 by

Kim McCreith Physio goPhysioMeet one of our physiotherapists, Kim McCreith.

I graduated in 2010, from Coventry University – since then, I’ve completed my APPI Pilates class instructor training and qualified in using Acupuncture, both of which are really useful in my work here at goPhysio!

In the last couple of years, I’ve started specialising in musculo-skeletal issues during pregnancy and post-natally. I have done some additional training with the APPI to teach Ante & Post Natal Pilates and also with the Pelvic Partnership, who do great job supporting women with SPD and PGP.

Outside of work, I love spending time in my garden and baking (then eating!) all sorts of cakes and biscuits. I also spend a lot of time on the side lines of the Rugby pitch, supporting my other half and fixing his injuries.


Sarah Cormack – Physiotherapist

Posted on 25th July 2016 by

Sarah Cormack Physiotherapist goPhysioSarah qualified in 2010 from Northumbria University in Newcastle. Her first post as physiotherapist came working for several Gaelic football and hurling clubs for some months.

Following this she made the more permanent move to the sunny south coast of England working in private practice and she’s been here ever since. Musculoskeletal physiotherapy including exercise rehabilitation is her main passion.

Sarah is specialised in treating paediatric musculoskeletal injuries and is a qualified Pilates Mat Work instructor, accredited by the APPI. She has also completed post-graduate courses in Sports Taping, Spinal Manipulation, Acupuncture and Orthotic Prescription.

In her spare time she likes to play softball, swim, do Pilates, get muddy tackling an obstacle course and try her hand at pretty much any watersport. And after all that a bit of travelling.


Paul Baker – Clinical Director goPhysio

Posted on 25th July 2016 by

Paul Baker Clinical Physiotherapy Director goPhysioHow long have you been a qualified Physiotherapist?

I’ve been a physiotherapist for nearly 20 years, qualifying in 1997 and opening goPhysio in 2001.

Why did you want to be a physio?

I was originally attracted to a career in physio for a wide variety of reasons, namely;

  • I was a keen sportsman and I participated in a wide variety of sport and exercise at school, including the Irish traditional sport of Gaelic football!
  • I was always interested in a healthcare type profession and helping people but was never keen on actually working in a hospital (hence private practice had always been my dream).
  • I wanted to have a career that used both my hands and my brain.
  • I enjoyed the fact that ‘outpatient’ physio was responsible for both the assessment and treatment of conditions and responsible for the whole patient journey from injury to recovery and involved the whole rehabilitation process.
  • My father had his own business, so I grew up around customers and business talk, so always wanted to have my own business one day.

Essentially, I was one of the lucky ones at school who always knew exactly what I wanted to do. I am very happy with my choice and creating goPhysio has realised my dream and I love being part of a profession, that 20 years later is still interesting, varied and rewarding.

So What do you do on a daily basis?

I particularly enjoy the diversity between my various clinical and non-clinical roles as Clinical Director at goPhysio. Day to day I am responsible for the clinical training of our team. I also still have a large role in continued clinical practice, and see a full list of patients every week. I am jointly responsible for the strategic business development at goPhysio and continually look at ways to improve and grow.

So ultimately my days are very varied and interesting, with many curve balls being thrown at me with the business mangement, whilst taking care of a wide range of interesting patients at different stages of their rehabilitation.

What’s your approach to patient care?

My philosophy is quite simple and is reflected in how we operate at goPhysio. Essentially we’ve setup the business to solve the day-to-day hassles of patients getting access to a quality physiotherapy service, at a moment’s notice.

We aim to be the first choice for local injured people, helping our patients achieve an active positive lifestyle, pain and injury free. This involves focusing and investing in our team, who in turn are best equipped to take care  of our patients, going the extra mile and keeping their promises in every interaction, optimising their recovery.

What hobbies or interest’s do you have outside work?

I love to keep active and enjoy taking on a new physical challenge! Over the years I’ve participated in a wide variety of sports for purely enjoyment & fitness, namely gaelic football, hurling, running, golf, soccer, Cross Fit, mountain biking, scuba diving, road cycling, kitesurfing, wake boarding and skiing, to name a few!

How can you help me?

Regardless of your background, lifestyle or sporting preference, I have a wide range of experience to help solve your injury problems and concerns and get you back to participating in the activities you enjoy.


Help! I’ve got back pain – what should I do?

Posted on 16th July 2016 by

Sudden onset of back pain is not uncommon, we see dozens of people a month at goPhysio who come in with quite severe pain in their back. Often this has come on suddenly without any warning.

It can be quite a scary experience, especially when it comes on quite quickly and is quite an intense pain. However, in the majority of cases back pain isn’t anything too serious and when handled in the right way will resolve quickly.

So, if you wake up with back pain or suddenly suffer with pain in your back, what should you do?

  1. Try and keep moving. Even though moving may make the pain worse, it’s very important to keep moving. If you’re afraid to move and just stay in 1 position this will actually make your problem worse. Moving will help reduce muscle spasm and help act as a natural painkiller by de-sensitising the injured area.
  2. Use a heat pack or hot water bottle on your back. This will help reduce muscle spasm, relieve pain and make it easier to move about. 10-15 minutes every couple of hours is good.
  3. Try and do some back exercises every couple of hours (after you’ve used heat above is a good time).
  4. Take painkillers. Speak to your pharmacist about the best ones to take for you, but painkillers are worth taking as they will help ease the pain which will make moving easier.
  5. As the pain eases, build up what you are doing. When the pain is quite severe, you may have to modify what you do day to day to minimise aggravating your pain, but try and get back to ‘normal’ ASAP.
  6. If your pain isn’t easing after 3-5 days or is getting worse, come and see one of our Physio’s. We’ll do a full assessment to get to the bottom of what’s causing your problem and start a penalised recovery plan to get it better and stop it coming back too.

These simple exercises are a great way to gently get your back moving and help ease pain and tension.

Pelvic Tilt – lying on your back, gently tilt your pelvis backward and forwards, so you’re alternately arching and flattening your lower back. You can also try this in sitting or standing.

Exercises for back painBack pain exercise

Lumbar Rotations – lying on your back, gently rotate your knees from side to side as far as you feel comfortable.

Spinal rotation exercisesExercise for back pain

Back Stretch – lying on your back, gently bend one leg up towards you with your hands round your knee. Repeat with the other leg.

back stretch

What if it doesn’t get better? Back pain will often ease off over a few days. If you find your pain isn’t improving or is getting worse, you’d benefit from coming to see one of our Physiotherapists. They’ll be able to work with you to provide relief from your back pain. Just give us a call on 023 8025 3317. You can also book an appointment online.

There are many common myths surrounding back pain. These include ‘Moving Will Make My Back Pain Worse’, ‘Should I Avoid Exercise?’ and ‘Do I Need A Scan?’, which you can read more about on our other blogs. We’ve also written about the latest NICE Guidelines on the management of back pain.

If you’re experiencing back pain and also have symptoms that affect you going to the toilet, having pins and needles or numbness around your seat area or pain or pins and needles in your leg, these may be signs of something more serious going on. If this is the case, it is advisable to go and see your GP.