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Back Pain: Britain’s Unseen Crisis

Posted on 1st March 2019 by

back pain itv

It was very refreshing to finally see some positive, mainstream media coverage about back pain on ITV last night.

For so long now, there has been much scaremongering, misinformation and fear surrounding the best way to manage back pain and unfortunately this has become ingrained in people’s minds. Professionals like ourselves, who see people with back pain day in day out, have been battling to dispel the myths surrounding back pain for so long. So, maybe the message is finally getting through!

So, what were the key messages that the programme promoted?

  • Surgery is often not the answer. For the vast majority of people it’s about rehab getting active and getting fit. Less than 1% of people with back pain might be considered for surgery.
  • 1 in 5 people who have an X-ray or scan for back pain do so unnecessarily. Having a scan when you don’t need it may actually make things worse, as normal signs of ageing can be misinterpreted. An MRI scan is not always needed to find out what’s going on, it’s not a picture of pain, it’s a picture of normal ageing changes.
  • It’s not easy to uncover what causes back pain.
  • There isn’t a quick fix solution.
  • Painkillers and rest are no longer recommended treatments for back pain.
  • Our progressive lack of movement and activity are a key factor in our back pain epidemic.
  • Spines LOVE movement!
  • We need to incorporate movement throughout the day into our lives, NOT just in intensive bursts of exercise like going to the gym, for a run or an exercise class.
  • The back is a strong and robust structure, we need to trust it and not be afraid of pain.
  • Sedentary lifestyles must be tackled in childhood to create her;thy lifelong habits and help prevent back pain. Keeping fit and healthy at an early age might be a way of future proofing our backs.

Some Back Pain Facts:

  • There are almost 10 million people in the UK suffering with lower back pain
  • It’s one of there most common reasons for days taken off work
  • Back pain accounts for over 30 million lost working days a year
  • Back pain affects up to 80% of us

You can watch ITV’s Tonight – Back Pain: Britain’s Unseen Crisis here until the end of March 2019.

Read more about back pain

Low back pain & sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Help I’ve got back pain, what should I do?

How to live an active, healthy lifestyle free from back pain



Can exercise help reduce migraines?

Posted on 3rd September 2018 by

Migraines are very common and research suggests that 3,000 migraine attacks occur every day for Exercise migraine goPhysioeach million of the general population. This equates to over 190,000 migraine attacks every day in the UK.

More than three quarters of migraineurs experience at least one attack each month, and more than half experience severe impairment during attacks

The cause for Migraines is not yet clear, it is thought there may be a link to genetics. Migraine is ranked globally as the seventh most disabling disease among all diseases (responsible for 2.9% of all years of life lost to disability (YLDs) and the leading cause of disability among all neurological disorders.

Some of the most common symptoms alongside headache are nausea, photophobia (sensitivity to light) and disability.

Recently, data from the research has been suggesting that moderate regular exercise can be an effective way to reduce the frequency of the attacks.

One of the reasons why it is thought that exercise may help sufferers of migraine, is because exercise stimulates your body to release natural pain controlling chemicals called endorphins and natural anti-depressant chemicals called enkephalins. Engaging in a well-planned, regular exercise program could help you to reduce your migraine medication needs, particularly medication taken daily to prevent migraine.

Krøll et all (2018) concluded that aerobic exercise consisting of bike/cross-trainer/brisk walking for 45 minutes, three times/week significantly reduced the impact of tension-type headache and neck pain. It helped reducing migraine frequency, pain intensity and duration.

Migraines are a very complex subject that requires a multifactorial approach in order to understand what is triggering the symptoms, how the symptoms behave and what’s the best treatment to reduce them/prevent them from happening. Exercise for some people can be a trigger for migraines, so embark on any new routes gradually and carefully. Read more about this here.

If you’d like some support in starting exercise or increasing your exercise levels, do get in touch. We offer a range of ways to support and help you on your journey.

References

Lotte Skytte Krøllet all (2018) – Theeffects of aerobic exercise for persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. A randomized, controlled, clinical trial

H. Hanssenet all (2017) – Effects of different endurance exercise modalities on migraine days and cerebrovascular health in episodic migraineurs: A randomized controlled trial

 

 

 

 

 


The Common Sense Guide to Exercise & Movement

Posted on 24th August 2018 by

The benefits of exercising, moving more and being active are undeniable. We must hear and see articles, posts and headlines about this on a daily basis. But sometimes it can all seem a bit daunting – what’s best to do, how often, why, is it enough, is it too much….???? So many questions! It’s sometimes so overwhelming that it seems easier not to do anything.

So, when we saw this great Common Sense Guide to Exercise & Movement from Cor-Kinetic, it was too good not to share with you. 20 fantastic, simple and easy to follow tips to help guide you to being more active!


Common Sense Movement Exercise Guidelines

If you need any help, guidance or support in your health & wellbeing journey, you can access our wide range of specialist services. These include:

Physiotherapy or Sports Therapy to help you recover from an injury to make sure you can exercise or be as active as you want to be!

Rehabilitation to work on getting you back to your pre-injury condition.

Pilates classes to build your strength, stability and body condition.

Active Ageing Classes, specially designed to help older people gain confidence in exercising in a safe, supported environment.

Please do get in touch to find out more!