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National Health Research Review

Posted on 13th July 2018 by

A new report from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), titled Moving Forward: Physiotherapy for Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing, has NHR Moving Forward Physio highlighted how effective physiotherapy is at improving outcomes for MSK conditions.

MSK or musculoskeletal conditions, are those that affect the bones, joints and muscles of the body, like back pain, arthritis, sprains, strains and overuse injuries. These conditions have a huge impact on our daily lives and it’s what our team at goPhysio specialise in managing. Musculoskeletal conditions are the leading cause of pain and disability in the UK, affecting more than one in four people. The evidence coming out of Moving Forward: Physiotherapy for Musculoskeletal Health and Wellbeing highlights the importance of physiotherapy for treating these conditions.

This review presents evidence from a range of physiotherapy-related studies. Data from these studies shows the beneficial impact physiotherapy has on a range of MSK conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, chronic knee joint pain and low back pain.

The key findings show that:

  • There is overwhelming evidence that exercise and activity are effective and should be a core treatment in musculoskeletal pain.
  • A rehabilitation programme including targeted exercise, is effective at reducing knee joint pain.
  • Investment in high quality rehabilitation adapted to individual patient needs, leads to better outcomes, reduces the need for further investigations and treatment, such as surgery or joint injections.
  • Work absences can be reduced by an average of five days when people receive advice on low back pain from physios.
  • Stretching and strengthening hand exercises can improve function for people with rheumatoid arthritis.

Make exercise a core treatment

The key message from the review is that there is overwhelming evidence that exercise and activity are effective for musculoskeletal pain. This is something that is fully integrated into our care at goPhysio.

  • When you see one of our Physio’s or Sports Therapists, you will always be given a customised exercise programme to help support your recovery. This will be emailed to you along with explanatory videos and/or pictures, so that you have access to the exercises and are confident what you should be doing in between your appointments.
  • We aim to keep you as active as possible whilst you recover from your injury. We offer solutions and alternatives to balance your recovery with staying active wherever possible. We rarely advocate complete rest!
  • We offer a comprehensive, specialist rehab service. Led by our Sports Therapy team, you will have the option to come along to supervised small group rehab sessions, where evidence based exercise is used to optimise your recovery and prevent long term issues. Read more about our rehab service here.
  • We also offer a range of specialist Clinical Pilates classes, which help build long term strength, flexibility and durability. A fantastic way to help recovery, manage long term MSK conditions and ward off injuries.

Our whole ethos here at goPhysio is “Helping local people live a healthy, active, positive life, free from pain & injury”, so it’s great to hear what we are doing and the way we work is supported by the last research.

Download the full report here.

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Love activity, Hate exercise? Do more of what you love with Physio!

Posted on 12th June 2018 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists has launched a new campaign, Love activity, Hate Love activity hate exercsie posterexercise?

It is well documented that physical inactivity is a major public health problem. This campaign sets about to help identify barriers that prevent people from being more active. It also highlights what a positive influence as Physio’s can have in promoting and supporting physical activity at every touch point.

As a team of Physiotherapists, Pilates Instructors, Sports Therapists & Sports Massage Practitioners, we all have an important role to play in promoting physical activity. We want to maximise the opportunities to discuss the benefits of physical activity and any barriers to it with our patients, and make exercise more accessible to a wider range of people.

goPhysio’s Clinical Director, Paul, says “It doesn’t have to be ‘exercise’ per se, ‘activity’ is what is great! It’s about keeping it simple, finding things that you enjoy doing that get you moving and challenge you physically. So, gardening, walking, playing tennis with friends, marathon running, taking the stairs instead of the lift, even pushing a trolley round the supermarket, they all count! That’s what’s great about this campaign, even if the term ‘exercise’ frightens you, you don’t need to be afraid of being active!”

Do more of what you love with physio is such a great term. It’s exactly what we do – help make sure you can do more of what you love doing!

So whether that’s physio or sports therapy treatment to help you recover from an injury, Pilates to help improve and maintain your physical wellbeing or Positive Steps elderly exercise classes, we run a host of services from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, Hampshire, that  help you do more of what you love.

So, what are the tips to getting started if you love activity but hate exercise?

  1. Find something you enjoy so that you’ll keep going.
  2. Set goals for yourself – big or small – to keep you motivated.
  3. Pace yourself – start slowly and gradually build up.
  4. It’s OK to ache but if pain persists, ease back and go slower.
  5. Need more motivation and support? Find someone join you!

If you need any help or support or just don’t know where to start, just get in touch. Our friendly and supportive team are here to help you.

 


Science & Exercise – getting you the best results!

Posted on 28th March 2018 by

When we are putting together an exercise based rehab programme for you as part of your recovery, there’s a lot that goes on behind it. To get you the best possible results and outcome, we want you to be working on the right things in the right way, not only helping you recover from your injury but helloing you building term, physical durability.

At goPhysio your bespoke programme will be constructed and tailored specifically to you using evidence-based research.

Here you can see an example of the top five exercises proven to target the glutes and hamstrings most effectively.

Hamstring Muscle activation

Gluteus Medius muscle activation

Gluteus maximus muscle activation

So, if you want an effective recovery plan from your injury, read more about our bespoke small group rehabilitation here.


Blue Monday

Posted on 14th January 2018 by

Blue MondayBlue Monday is a name given to a day in January (typically the third Monday of the month) claimed to be the most depressing day of the year. This year it’s Monday 15th January 2018.

However, knowing it’s coming up, you could make a conscious effort to set out and enjoy it – in different ways perhaps, but just as much as you would enjoy a warm summer’s day. How can that be possible?

Well, it’s really is up to you whether you exist in a prison on Blue Monday, or you enjoy yourself. If you prefer the latter, our suggestion is simple: exercise.

Aerobic exercise, any steady movement you enjoy—walking, jogging, swimming, cycling—boosts endorphins, and will leave you feeling calmer and happier.

To stay healthy, adults should do 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity every week. If you haven’t exercised for a while, gradually introduce physical activity into your daily routine. Any exercise is better than none. Even a 15-minute walk can clear your mind and relax.

And after that, who wouldn’t like a massage? Treat yourself and add a therapeutic massage to your routine. You’ll feel, look and simply be healthier far into the future. It’ll promote a faster healing of strained muscles and sprained ligaments; reducing pain and swelling as well as formation of excessive scar tissue

Make your Blue Monday the best Monday of the year!


Official Health Partners of the Hendy Eastleigh 10k

Posted on 5th December 2017 by

We are excited to announce a fantastic new partnership with the Hendy Eastleigh 10k, as we become theEastleigh 10k goPhysio official Health Partner of the race.

One of the largest 10k road races in the country, the Hendy Eastleigh 10k is to be held on Sunday 18th March 2018. It is set to attract around 2,800 runners  and will celebrate it’s 34th anniversary next year.

Clinical Director of goPhysio Paul Baker said he is delighted to be part of such a fantastic event.

Hendy Eastleigh 10k“We help so many runners here at goPhysio and see first hand how important running is to people. To be involved in this great, local event, and have the opportunity to support so many runners is really exciting!”

With just 3 months to go until the Hendy Eastleigh 10k it is never to late to get your running shoes on and get going!

Still need convincing? Here’s a few reasons from our team why running is such a great form of exercise.

Why it’s great to run!

Running is one of the best forms of aerobic exercise for physical conditioning of the heart and
lungs. Studies have shown that running has huge health benefits and it can help you experience more energy, patience, humour and creativity. It can even make you happier! So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running.

Running improves your health Running is a fantastic way to increase your overall health. Research shows that running can raise your levels of good cholesterol, increase lung function, boost your immune system & lower your risk of cardiovascular diseases. running can even fortify your immune system by accelerating the circulation of protective cells.

Running is great for your heart It’s the king of cardio. Running, even 30 minutes or so a few days a week, can help prevent or reduce high blood pressure. According to a landmark study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, running is associated with a drastically reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Running makes you happier The rush of chemicals (endorphins) your body experiences after a run can give you a ‘runners high’. Running can reduce stress, anxiety and depression. A recent study even found that just 30 minutes of running a week, for three weeks, can boost sleep quality, mood and concentration during the day.

It’s easy and convenient Whatever your schedule, you can always squeeze in a run. Just put on your trainer’s and off you go! You can even run whilst your kids cycle or with a baby in a pushchair, take your dog or run your commute!

It’s a cheap way to exercise No gym membership, joining fees or sneaky add-ons. Just the occasional pair of trainers every 500 miles or so, means running is a cost effective way to exercise regularly.

Running seriously torches calories Running is a great calorie burn. It’s one of the best forms of exercise for losing or maintaining consistent weight. The bonus is that the calorie burn continues after you stop running and regular running boosts this “after-burn”, amplifying the effects even more.

It’s a killer leg workout Your body’s biggest muscles are all in your legs and running benefits them all, it’s a great workout to strengthen these important muscles.

You can do it right now Running is such a natural motion, you don’t need to invest in special In the early stage, depending on your targets, you don’t need lessons like many other sports, as running is such a natural motion, just pop on your trainer’s and away you go.

Running strengthens your joints and bones It’s long been known that running helps increases bone mass, and even helps stem age-related bone loss or osteoporosis. It’s also great news for your knees, as a recent study found runners were half as likely to suffer with knee arthritis compared with walkers.

Running can add years to your life It’s recommended that we do at least 30 minutes of exercise, 5 times a week. Making sure you meet these recommendations will help you live a long and healthy life!

Running works your core A surprise to some, but running actually works your core too. The rotation in your spine as you run, challenges your core muscles, helping strengthen your spine. Running on uneven surfaces provides an extra challenge.

Running helps mental health We all live in a busy, stressful time. Running provides the opportunity to take some time purely for yourself, away from your phone, emails, colleagues and kids. You can get primitive with running, giving your brain space to recharge. It can help you to unwind and relax. It’s difficult to come back after a run stressed!

Running improves your sleep Feeling tired from exercise improves your ability to fall and stay asleep. Improving the quality of your sleep is now thought to be a fundamental part of your health and wellbeing. It is even thought that running can help cure insomnia!

Running boosts your confidence Running can boost your confidence and self-esteem. By setting and achieving goals, you can help give yourself a greater sense of empowerment that can leave you much happier and improve your overall feeling of wellbeing and mental health.

It’s a world of discovery Explore new parks, hidden tracks, forests, beaches, river paths, the list goes on. You can run anywhere, any time and enjoy the change of seasons and all the elements as you do.

Running boosts your memory Running can stimulate brain growth as it helps stimulate an increase in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which encourages neural growth.

Running is a great way to socialise Runners, love nothing more than talking to runners about running. There are so many social aspects to running, whether it’s joining a running club, taking part in a Parkrun or training for an event, there’s a lot of support and camaraderie found amongst runners.

There you have it! Many ways in which running can help you become healthier and happier. Every time you run, you’ll improve your resting heart rate, your body will release endorphins, your legs will get stronger and you’ll burn a whole lot of calories. In the end you’ll be happier, fitter and stronger! Remember the key to better health is right under your toes……

So, grab your trainers and head out to explore the world of running. You’ll thank yourself for it!

Eastleigh 10k health partner goPhysio

Enter the Hendy Eastleigh 10k here.


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Speak Up and Speak Out About Stress

Posted on 1st November 2017 by

This Wednesday is National Stress Awareness Day, we take a look at what stress is really doing to our  National Stress Awareness Day bodies and how we can both recognise it and combat it.

What is stress?

Stress is anything which exerts pressure on us beyond our individual ability to cope. It has traditionally been thought of as a flight or fight response; increasing our alertness, muscle tone and heart rate to respond to a perceived threat. However modern-day stress can come in many forms such as workplace pressures, relationship issues, juggling family commitments or looking after a sick relative, which can all take their toll.

What happens when we are stressed?

When we are stressed our body releases chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones are imperative for our survival, however if their levels are sustained for a prolonged period they will start to impact on our physical health and affect many different organs in our body.

Symptoms of stress

Symptoms of stress can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Indecisiveness
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Chronic muscle pain
  • Over or under eating
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Reflux
  • Increased risk of diabetes, heart conditions and stroke
  • Increased susceptibility to colds and viruses

Can exercise help with stress?

Yes! Exercise helps lower our blood pressure, reduce the levels of stress hormones in our body, improve our mood, our muscle flexibility and tone, as well as distracting us from other stressors and helping us to get a good night’s sleep.

Great forms of stress-busting exercise include classes such as Pilates, tai chi and yoga, which focus on breathing and flexibility of the body. They also give us the opportunity to ‘check in’ with ourselves and become more aware of how we are feeling physically and mentally. Whilst this gives us some much needed me-time, classes can also be a great social opportunity which is perfect for boosting our mood!

The ISMA (international stress management association) has come up with 7 positive ways to influence stress

1. Change the thought – Change the outcome

This is the starting point, reprogramming your brain by replacing an unhelpful negative thought or belief with a new positive one. Use your imagination to visualise or ‘show’ your brain what you want. The power of the mind cannot be over-estimated!

2. Self-belief starts with you

This is an empowering way of taking more control in your life rather than relying on others to make you feel good. Do something fun or caring for yourself today!

3. Don’t just do what you did last year

Repeating what you always do will bring you the same outcome unless others change & this is not in your control. So if you didn’t like all that happened last year make plans & set new goals, do something different!

4. Deal with difficult decisions now, not later

“Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today” We all know this but positive action is required to make it happen. Prioritize & do the difficult tasks first in the day so you have a clear focus for the rest of the day making you less stressed & more productive!

5. Find reasons to say “yes”

“I would love to but….” here comes the negative reason why you can’t! It can be a really positive experience to just say yes, if it is possible & what you want, then try to find ways that will allow you the opportunity, maybe you need others to persuade you, take control & decide for yourself!

6. Renegotiate

Stuck with what you have always had & now want a change? Look at learning to develop & use your assertive skills, ask for what you want, discuss your changing needs, expectations with yourself & others to reach the deal that works for you!

7. Flip it!

There are always two sides to every situation, sometimes more. Take time to look at all your options, don’t just assume, maybe ask others & make informed choices based on facts!

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National Fitness Day 2017

Posted on 26th September 2017 by

National Fitness Day 2017 This year’s National Fitness Day is on Wednesday 27th September and promises to continue to encourage the nation to celebrate the fun of fitness and physical activity across the UK.

As part of National Fitness Day, UK Active will be running a social media campaign – #Fitness2Me

#Fitness2Me aims to celebrate what fitness means to people, promoting that keeping physically active means something different to us all.

UK Active want to make #Fitness2Me the biggest movement in breaking down the barriers that stop people being active, showing that fitness is for everyone!

They hope that by encouraging people from all walks of life, activity levels, and interests to share what fitness means to them, it will inspire others to live healthier and happier lives through being active.

So if it is getting fit, getting happy, playing with grandkids, or connecting with pets, whatever it means to you we want to hear about it!

  • Simply grab a piece of paper and scribble down what Fitness Means 2 You
  • Then take a photo or capture a video to share with us on social media
  • Don’t forget to add #Fitness2Me and #FitnessDay and tag us via @FitnessDayUK

A major issue that people face when trying to increase activity levels, is overcoming perceived or actual barriers.

Here are some suggestions for overcoming barriers to physical activity.

Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers
Lack of time Identify available time slots. Monitor your daily activities for one week. Identify at least three 30-minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
Add physical activity to your daily routine. For example, walk or ride your bike to work or shopping, organise school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stairclimbing.
Social influence Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family. Ask them to support your efforts.
Invite friends and family members to exercise with you. Plan social activities involving exercise, like family walks or walk to a coffee shop with a friend.
Develop new friendships with physically active people. Join a group, such as a walking club.
Lack of energy Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel most energetic naturally.
Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level; then, try it.
Lack of motivation Plan ahead. Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it on your calendar.
Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
Join an exercise group or class.
Fear of injury Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health status.
Make sure you get any injuries checked out, so you have confidence to exercise without fear. 
Lack of skill Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs, or jogging.
Take a class to develop new skills.
Lack of resources Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, skipping, or free online classes.
Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community Park Run, Eastleigh Borough Council Activities, Health walks etc. 
Weather conditions Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor cycling, free online classes, indoor swimming,  stair climbing, skipping, dancing, yoga, etc.)
Travel Put a skipping rope in your suitcase and skip.
Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
Join a nationwide gym.
Visit the local shopping centre and walk for half an hour or more.
Bring your mp3 player your favorite aerobic exercise music.
Family obligations Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbour, or family member who also has small children.
Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, do an aerobic dance or exercise video for kids (there are several online) and exercise together. You can spend time together and still get your exercise.
True skipping, ride a stationary bicycle, or use other home gymnasium equipment while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g., during school hours or their nap time).
Retirement years Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less. Spend more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren. Children with short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, line dancing, or swimming.
Now that you have the time, make regular physical activity a part of every day. Go for a walk every morning or every evening before dinner. Treat yourself to an exercycle and ride every day while reading a favorite book or magazine.

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New report shows health benefits of swimming

Posted on 22nd June 2017 by

A new report has just been published, that outlines the health benefits of swimming.

Based on significant evidence and research, the report summarises that:

“As one of the most popular modes of physical activity, swimming/aquatic exercise confers significant physical health benefits for both healthy individuals and those with disease. Furthermore, these health benefits extend across the entire life-course – from foetus through to the frail elderly.”

As physiotherapist, we often recommend swimming to our patients. Water is an excellent environment for exercising in, not only as a regular, low impact form of exercise but also if you’re recovering from an injury. The buoyancy of water helps promote freedom of movement, increasing joint mobility and easing pain and stiffness. You don’t have to go to a pool and swim lengths! We often give people exercises to do in the water, that they wouldn’t always be able to do on dry land. It is also a fantastic way of maintaining fitness if you aren’t able to take part in your normal high impact exercise (such as running) due to an injury. Swimming can be a way to maintain cardiovascular fitness and endurance, whilst your injury heals and progress is being made at gradually returning you to your normal exercise.

A recent example of a young patient we’ve had at goPhysio, where swimming has been excellent. An 11 year old keen footballer with Severs (heel pain related to growth), Unable to play or attend football training more than twice a week due to heel pain, this young boy was becoming increasingly frustrated, starting to gain weight and loose cardiovascular fitness. Part of the management of Severs is to modify activity and treatments are limited, with time and normal growth rate  being a key part of symptom reduction. So, he was advised to start swimming regularly and his progress has been amazing. He’s felt more positive, been able to maintain and improve fitness and has gradually increased his time on the pitch, without aggravating his pain. Swimming has paid a key part in helping his endurance, strength, muscle flexibility and psychological wellbeing.

The report summarises that  for musculoskeletal health “evidence suggests that aquatic exercise has positive effects for a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions, favourably influencing pain, function and, for some, quality of life. The nature of the aquatic environment is ideally suited to individuals with MSK problems, given the reduced compressive joint force secondary to buoyancy.”

Health Benefits of Swimming

Source: The health & wellbeing benefits of swimming. Commissioned by Swim England’s Swimming and Health Commission, chaired by Professor Ian Cumming, Produced June 2017

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Men’s Health Week- Have you got a hazardous waist?

Posted on 13th June 2017 by

This week is Men’s Health Week 2017 – which runs from June 12-18 – the focus this year is about abdominal obesity – better known as ‘belly fat’. Men's Health Week 2017

Why? Because it’s the type of fat that’s bad for your health and men are more likely to have it.

Belly fat is a problem because it lurks not just beneath the surface but also gets down deep and surrounds your vital organs. Regardless of your overall weight, a large amount of belly fat increases your risk of:

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Sleep apnea
  • Premature death from any cause
  • High blood pressure

So, men need to get those tape measures out. If you have a waist measurement over 37 inches (94cm), you are at increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer, stroke and erection problems. If it’s over 40 inches (102cm), you’re ar a considerably increased risk of all these. The measurement is not the same as your trouser size. Measure your stomach at the belly button.

MOVE MORE, EAT WELL, WATCH THE BOOZE.

Want to get serious about tackling your waist? We offer a range of gentle and carefully managed ways to exercise and get you moving more.

  • First and foremost, if you’ve picked up an injury or are in pain, the first thing you do is move less. This can have a substantial knock on effect on your activity levels and habit. So, if you’re in pain or have an injury that’s stopping you being active – whether it’s cycling, walking to work, playing golf, running or doing a few laps of the pool, get in touch or book your physio appointment so that we can help you sort out your injury.
  • Pilates is a fantastic way to get you moving well. Many of the exercises really focus on that core middle area and although they aren’t specifically designed to slim down your waist, many people report that this is an additional benefit.
  • If you’re over 60 and keen to exercise but wary of going to a gym or not sure what exercises are advised or appropriate, why not come along to our Positive Steps exercise classes. They are specially designed for the older generations, and will help give you the confidence to push your body a little.
  • If back pain is stopping you from exercising, why not try our Active Backs classes. Exercises sessions specifically tailored for people with back pain, they will help you learn what exercises will help with your back and again, help improve your confidence in exercising.

Men's Health Week 2017

 

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10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back

Posted on 4th May 2017 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) have today launched a great new campaign, ’10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back’.

Back pain research constantly gives new insights into previously held beliefs. Their new guide reflects these advances to give clear, simple advice on how to manage your pain and prevent future episodes.

Here’s the latest advice from the CSP:

  1. Your back is stronger than you may think Most people worldwide will experience back pain during their lifetime. It can be disabling and worrying but it is very common and rarely dangerous. The spine is a strong, stable structure and not easily damaged so in most instances it is a simple sprain or strain. In these cases – 98 per cent, according to research – people recover reasonably quickly, and many do so without treatment. Some people experience repeat episodes, which can be distressing, but again these are rarely dangerous.
  2. You rarely need a scan and it can do more harm than good
    This is because seeing perfectly normal changes to their spine can cause people to avoid the activities they should be doing to get better, such as exercise and movement in general. In very rare cases, there may be something more serious or underlying that requires medical advice. A scan may help with your diagnosis and symptoms to be aware of are at the bottom of this page. However, these account for just two per cent of cases so if your physio or GP does not send you for one, you should take it as a good sign that there is nothing concerning going on.
  3. Avoid bed rest, stay in work and gradually resume normal activities
    Scientific studies now indicate prolonged rest and avoidance of activity for people with low back pain actually leads to higher levels of pain, greater disability, poorer recovery and longer absence from work. In the first few days of a new episode of low back pain, avoiding aggravating activities may help to relive pain. However, staying as active as possible and returning to all usual activities gradually is actually important in aiding recovery – this includes staying in work where possible. While it is normal to move differently and more slowly in the first few days of having back pain, this altered movement can be unhealthy if continued in the long-term.
  4. You should not fear bending or lifting
    Bending and lifting are often portrayed as causes of back pain and while an injury can occur if something is picked up in an awkward or unaccustomed way, it’s most likely to just be a sprain or strain. The important thing is to practice and get your body used to carrying different loads and weights in a way we find comfortable and efficient. We all run differently, and it’s perfectly normal for us to find our own technique for lifting.
  5. Exercise and activity reduce and prevent back pain
    Exercise is shown to be very helpful for tackling back pain and is also the most effective strategy to prevent future episodes. Start slowly and build up both the amount and intensity of what you do and don’t worry if it’s sore to begin with – you won’t be damaging your back. No one type of exercise is proven to be more effective than others so just pick an exercise you enjoy, that you can afford to maintain in the long-term and that fits in with your daily schedule.
  6. Painkillers will not speed up your recovery
    There is no strong evidence on the benefits of painkillers and they do not speed up recovery. They should only be used in conjunction with other measures, such as exercise, and even then just as a short-term option as they can bring side effects. Exercise, which is safer and cheaper, is considered the preferred option.
  7. Surgery is rarely needed
    There are some uncommon back conditions where there is pressure on the nerves that supply the legs and the patient gets leg symptoms, such as pain, pins and needles or numbness. For these conditions, surgery can help the leg symptoms but it is important to understand that it is not always required. You also need to know that on average, the results for back surgery are no better in the medium and long term than non-surgical interventions, such as exercise. So a non-surgical option, which includes exercise and activity, should always come first.
  8. Get good quality sleep
    The importance of sleep in tackling back pain has become increasingly clear in recent years. This is because it reduces stress and improves your overall feeling of wellbeing, making you less susceptible to the triggers of pain in the first instance and helping you to cope when it does occur. Aim for 7.5-8 hours a night and try to aim for a regular routine, as far as possible. It is also very important to know that there is no best position or type of mattress – whatever feels most comfortable for you is best.
  9. You can have back pain without any damage or injury
    Many physical or psychological factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. Many factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. They could be– Physical factors, such as ‘protecting’ the back and avoiding movements, or a simple strain.
    – Psychological factors, including a fear of damage or not getting better, feeling down or being stressed.
    – More general health and lifestyle factors, like being tired and rundown, not getting enough good quality sleep, being overweight or not getting enough physical activity
    – Social triggers, such as difficult relationships at work or home, low job satisfaction or stressful life events, like a family death or illness. Crucially, it’s important to know that all pain is 100 per cent real and never ‘all in your head’, even when factors like stress or mood are involved. Each of the factors can turn up the volume on your pain and gaining a greater understanding of when that can happen puts you in a stronger position to recognise them and learn how to turn down the dial again.
  10. If it doesn’t clear up, seek help but don’t worry Physiotherapists provide expert advice, guidance and treatment for back pain. This is to help reduce your chances of future episodes, while improving your overall health and well-being.

At goPhysio, we offer a range of services to help you manage your back pain. 

Physiotherapy – If you want reassurance and help to become more confident with your back, physiotherapy can help. We can provide expert guidance and treatment for your back pain, tailored to you and your lifestyle. You can book an appointment online or give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

Clinical Pilates – Our specialist Pilates classes are a great way to keep you strong and active. They focus on building strength and flexibility and being able to move well. The classes are small and you will be under the close supervision of one of our Therapists at all times. We run 17 classes a week, including evenings and weekends, at a variety of levels, so it’s easy to find a class to suit you. Have a look at our latest timetable.

Yoga Classes – Our onsite Yoga classes are another great way to get you moving. We offer a range of different styles of yoga, including a gentle and restorative class for beginners to a more challenging Himalayan Hatha class. Bookings are made easily online, you can find out more about booking here.

Active Backs – Our Active Backs classes are supervised exercise classes, specially designed for people who have or have had back pain. The classes will help build your confidence in exercising and are combined with education and advice to empower you. These classes can be booked online.

Symptoms to be aware of:

These symptoms are very rare but you should contact a doctor if you experience any of them:

  • Difficulty passing urine or having the sensation to pass water that is not there
  • Numbness/tingling in your genitals or buttocks area
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control
  • Impaired sexual function, such as loss of sensation during intercourse
  • Loss of power in your legs
  • Feeling unwell with your back pain, such as a fever or significant sweating that wakes you from sleep

Read More:

Low back pain and sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Help, I’ve got back pain! What should I do?

Back Pain Myths