Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Being Active With Arthritis

Posted on 5th June 2019 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists are launching a new campaign, as part of their ‘Love Activity, Hate Exercise?’ initiative.

Being Active With Arthritis

This campaign, Being Active With A Long Term Condition, is focusing on how daunting it can be to start to become more active, especially if you haven’t done much exercise before and you are managing a health condition. The new campaign is aimed at helping people to become more active, despite having a long-term condition. They have released special guides for 10 of some of the most common long teem health conditions, including arthritis, cancer, diabetes and dementia.

We see many people who are living with arthritis here at goPhysio, so this new guidance is very helpful for many of the people we help. The evidence to support the benefits of physical activity to help people with arthritis is overwhelming.

Activity and exercise has the potential to help you if you have arthritis in many ways, including:

  • Reduce your pain
  • Improve your mobility and independence
  • Help you get stronger
  • Improve your balance
  • Increase your fitness levels
  • Prevent or delay need for surgery

So, if you are living with arthritis and would like to get more active, here’s how you can get started.

  • Choose an exercise type that you’ll enjoy or perhaps revisit one that you have enjoyed in the past.
  • Strengthening, cardiovascular and mobility exercises have all been shown to be helpful for arthritis, but the type is less important than the enjoyment factor and sticking to it long term.
  • There are no exercises that are off limits, at least in principle. Sometimes care needs to be taken and stepping stone exercises might be required to get to a particular activity but be reassured that any exercise will be helpful in the long term.
  • Start off at a lighter intensity and then build up slowly allowing yourself time to accommodate an increase in intensity.
  • Some pain or even a slight increase in pain is ok during and after the exercise but it should settle back to pre-exercise levels in 24 hours, not be too severe, or coincide with protracted swelling, heat or redness of joints.
  • It might be appropriate to start your exercise in the pool where the decreased weight bearing will be more comfortable. Running, squats and lunges are all possible and practicing in the pool first will allow some time for your body to get used to the movements.
  • Choosing the right environment for you might require some experimentation. The gym is not the only option. For some exercising with a partner will be motivating, whilst others might find it distracting. Pick your preference but be open to different options.
  • Consider your other health needs. Diet, sleep, limiting smoking and keeping stress as low as possible are all just as important as exercise to manage arthritis symptoms.
  • If you get stuck, don’t know where to begin, or are struggling with the symptoms, why not seek professional advice from one of our team, who can complete a comprehensive assessment and give you guidance on how to implement your program.

In addition to individual consultations with one of our Physio team, we are also able to offer a range of services that can tempt, encourage and support you to become more active if you’re living with arthritis.

Older People's Day

Positive Steps – This exercise class, designed specifically for those in later life, is a small and un-intimidating exercise class. You’ll work through a series of exercises to develop strength, mobility, balance and flexibility. It’s full of fun and laughter and some great friendships have formed through exercise. If you’d like to come along and have a try, the first class is free. You’ll find more details here.

Rehabilitation – If you’d like to be challenged, we offer a 6 week, individualised exercise programme, tailored just for you. You’ll be expertly guided and encouraged through a series of exercises that will help you achieve your own personal goals. Find out more here.

Clinical Pilates – If you’re after something a little more gentle (although can be surprisingly challenging!), our Clinical Pilates classes could be for you. Teaching you to move well, with control and balance, Pilates is a great way to get you stronger. It is ideal for those with long term health conditions such as arthritis and as you’ll be carefully guided by one of our Clinical experts, so will have the additional support and care to help you work the right areas.

If you’d like any help or guidance or would like to find out more about any of our services, then please give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

#LoveActivity #HateExercise

Read More

New exercise guide for people with arthritis

An arthritis overview

6 Arthritis Myths



Back Pain: Britain’s Unseen Crisis

Posted on 1st March 2019 by

back pain itv

It was very refreshing to finally see some positive, mainstream media coverage about back pain on ITV last night.

For so long now, there has been much scaremongering, misinformation and fear surrounding the best way to manage back pain and unfortunately this has become ingrained in people’s minds. Professionals like ourselves, who see people with back pain day in day out, have been battling to dispel the myths surrounding back pain for so long. So, maybe the message is finally getting through!

So, what were the key messages that the programme promoted?

  • Surgery is often not the answer. For the vast majority of people it’s about rehab getting active and getting fit. Less than 1% of people with back pain might be considered for surgery.
  • 1 in 5 people who have an X-ray or scan for back pain do so unnecessarily. Having a scan when you don’t need it may actually make things worse, as normal signs of ageing can be misinterpreted. An MRI scan is not always needed to find out what’s going on, it’s not a picture of pain, it’s a picture of normal ageing changes.
  • It’s not easy to uncover what causes back pain.
  • There isn’t a quick fix solution.
  • Painkillers and rest are no longer recommended treatments for back pain.
  • Our progressive lack of movement and activity are a key factor in our back pain epidemic.
  • Spines LOVE movement!
  • We need to incorporate movement throughout the day into our lives, NOT just in intensive bursts of exercise like going to the gym, for a run or an exercise class.
  • The back is a strong and robust structure, we need to trust it and not be afraid of pain.
  • Sedentary lifestyles must be tackled in childhood to create her;thy lifelong habits and help prevent back pain. Keeping fit and healthy at an early age might be a way of future proofing our backs.

Some Back Pain Facts:

  • There are almost 10 million people in the UK suffering with lower back pain
  • It’s one of there most common reasons for days taken off work
  • Back pain accounts for over 30 million lost working days a year
  • Back pain affects up to 80% of us

You can watch ITV’s Tonight – Back Pain: Britain’s Unseen Crisis here until the end of March 2019.

Read more about back pain

Low back pain & sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Help I’ve got back pain, what should I do?

How to live an active, healthy lifestyle free from back pain



It’s all about LOAD!

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

We appreciate you guys don’t want to get bogged down with the science, research or evidence behind the ways we help you – you just want us to help you recover from your injury, quickly!

But to us, the science and latest evidence is important, it helps us get the best results for you in the best way. So we always get a little bit excited when we see or read what the latest evidence is saying (especially when it’s presented in a fab infographic!).

This infographic, that was shared by Trust me, I’m a Physiotherapist, really highlights the power of loading.

Load & Strength Chandlers Ford

LOADING is currently a bit of a ‘buzz’ word in the physio & rehab circles. And with good reason. In recovery terms, rest isn’t often the best way forwards but progressive loading is! As the infographic above summarises, many of the body’s tissues will get stronger if they are subject to loading.

So, what exactly is loading?

The definition of load is………..

A weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something.

In exercise or rehab terms, loading means working with some weight or resistance to place greater demands on your body. So, that can be using just your body weight, some light resistance, like bands or machines, or using weights. So, running is loading – you’re loading all the structures in your legs (bones, muscles, joints, tendons & ligaments) through the repeated pressure between your foot striking the surface with every step. A press up loads the structures around your shoulder and arms, just as a squat loads your hips and knees. Now, if you add holding a weight whilst you squat, you are increasing the load.

What is important is that loading is gradually progressed. You don’t want to demand too much of your body too quickly (or too often), especially if you’re recovering from an injury, as this will be counterproductive. It’s a careful balance.

The ultimate result of all this loading is that you will have a stronger and more resilient body. It will cope better with the demands placed upon it, making you less prone to picking up injuries, helping you enjoy an active lifestyle and potentially preventing longterm conditions such as osteoporosis.

Put simply, your tissues will adapt to the demands you place upon them.

If you think you would benefit from some guidance on realising the benefits of loading, then do get in touch. Our fully equipped Strong Room and experienced team offer that unique combination of being able to guide you on progressive loading within your own limits. We consider your ‘whole picture’ – where you are now, any injuries or conditions that affect you, what you love (or would love) to do and most importantly where you want to be. We then use our knowledge, experience and skills to tailor a programme just for you and support you as much or as little as you need.

Give us a call or drop us an email to find out more.


Body Worlds – Body Amazing

Posted on 9th January 2019 by

It’s not everyone’s idea of a New Year day outing, but if you’re a family of Physio’s & Personal Trainers, it fit’s the bill!

Body Worlds London

We love having a little day trip planned for New Year’s day. Having visited the Body World’s exhibition when it first came to the UK as a newly qualified Physio (many, many years ago), and seeing it had returned to London, we decided to make this our 1st event of 2019!

The philosophy behind Body Worlds is preventative healthcare. The Body Worlds exhibitions were conceived to educate the public about the inner workings of the human body and to show the effects of healthy and unhealthy lifestyles. The exhibitions are aimed to inspire visitors to become aware of the fragility of their bodies and to recognise the anatomical individual beauty inside each of us. And it certainly achieved this for us! With our group age ranging from 4 to 70, the exhibition kept us all engaged for a good few hours.

It was very interesting and made me aware of how much power you have over your body. It showed me that smoking can decrease your life by many years, as it makes your lungs black.

Annabelle, Aged 10

What were the highlights, messages & takeaways?

  • The human body is undeniably AMAZING! Seeing it stripped back (literally) to all it’s amazing components was fascinating.
  • Stress plays a huge part in health and wellbeing. We all realised that stress features highly in our lives now on a daily basis and the exhibition reminded us to take stock and slow down.
  • The effects of obesity on our health and seeing it in 3D, and how diet and exercise are so crucial, was frightening. You are what you eat has never had so much power!
  • The ITB is huge and there is definitely no way you can stretch it!

People are like bicycles. They can keep their balance only as long as they keep moving.

Albert Einstein

The Einstein quote really resonated – at goPhysio we’re all about movement! And life is all about being balanced. A healthy mind and body, supported by eating well, sleeping well, relaxing well and moving well, as we wrote about in a previous blog, are so important. None can be neglected and we are privileged to work with so many people and support them with their movement as a crucial part of this healthy jigsaw.

And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.

Abraham Lincoln
Body Worlds Nervous System
The Nervous System (can you spot the Sciatic nerve?)
The exhibition ended with this fantastic TED Talk from survivor of the Hudson River plane crash in 2009. 3 Things I Learned While My Plane Crashed. Well worth a watch.


For more information and tickets to the London exhibition, take a look here.


RAMP – 4 Steps For An Effective Warm Up

Posted on 29th November 2018 by

We often get asked what’s the best way to ‘warm up’ before exercising or playing sports. Holding stretches is certainly a thing of the past, and hopefully this is no longer part of people’s warm up routines! But what should you be doing to warm up?

A warm up is basically exactly what it says on the tin – warming up your body! It can be an integral part of your exercise or sport, it certainly doesn’t have to be a totally separate thing.

We’ve found a great way to remember what you should be including in your warm up and it’s called the RAMP principle.

You can follow the RAMP principle for the most effective warm up for your sport or exercise. Here’s Sports Therapist Tom giving a bit of a demo.

R – raise your body temperature and heart rate. Spend 5-10 minutes doing light activity.

A – activate the key muscles involved in the activity. Especially lower back and pelvic area and core stabilisers.

M – mobilise all the joints involved in the sport or activity.

P – potentiate (perform sport specific movements to prepare the body for activity).These would be sub-maximal lifts (weight lifting) or plyometrics (jumping) for example

Read More

How to warm up for running 

Warming up for running, do I really need to?

Warming up for sport – what to consider 


 


National Stress Awareness Day: Can Exercise Help?

Posted on 2nd November 2018 by

National Stress Awareness Day is today and it aims to make people more aware of the impact stress National Stress Awareness Daycan have on your everyday life. It also aims to help people identify ways to deal with this stress and find a way to reduce it.

Research has shown that increased stress levels can lead to an increased risk of injury.

How do stress levels impact on injury risk?

  • Stress can increase muscular tension, which can then lead to aches and pain. Neck and back muscles are particularly prone to stress related tension.
  • Increased muscular tension can also lead to muscle strains or tears as the muscle is under a greater load and is less flexible than normal.
  • Stress levels may cause you to forget an important piece of equipment when working out, such as proper running shoes or corrective orthotic insoles. This places additional strain on your body, raising the risk of injury.
  • Stress on your time management might force you to exercise at different times, for example first thing in the morning when your muscles aren’t fully warmed up or last thing in the day when you are tired. It might also cause you to rush or not take as much care when you are exercising.
  • High stress levels can also reduce your body’s immunity levels, increasing the likelihood of a poor recovery from any minor injury.
  • You may also find that stress distracts you from the activity in front of you – whether that is exercising, working or even a simple task such as crossing the road or walking up stairs. This distraction could result in a sprained joint or pulled muscle.

Research has also suggested that stress can be reduced through regular exercise and movement.

How can exercise reduce my stress levels?

  • Exercise gives you something to focus on away from the cause of your stress.
    It helps to boost your mood by increasing self confidence, improving sleep quality and reducing anxiety.
  • Any form of exercise will help – even a short walk at lunch time or getting off the bus a stop early allows you to get some fresh air and takes your mind away from stressful thoughts.
  • A flexibility based exercise, such as Pilates or Yoga, will help to reduce muscle tension and can help ease aching related to this.
  • Scheduling some time specifically for exercising may also help as it will give your day structure and breaks up time spent sat in front of the computer!
  • If you exercise with friends, colleagues or family, the social element of this will again boost your mood and reduce stress levels.
  • Find a new sport or something fun to do – there are lots of different things out there to try!

Many people find a regular, professional sports or deep tissue massage can be a really great way to relieve the build up of stress and tension physically. It also gives you time to yourself to unwind.

Here are the top 10 steps to stress free living from International Stress Management Association UK.

National Stress Awareness Day

#NationalStressAwarenessDay


Speak Up and Speak Out About Stress

Posted on 1st November 2018 by

This week is National Stress Awareness Week, with Wednesday being National Stress Awareness Day. So here we take a look at what stress is really doing to our  National Stress Awareness Day bodies and how we can both recognise it and combat it.

What is stress?

Stress is anything which exerts pressure on us beyond our individual ability to cope. It has traditionally been thought of as a flight or fight response; increasing our alertness, muscle tone and heart rate to respond to a perceived threat. However modern-day stress can come in many forms such as workplace pressures, relationship issues, juggling family commitments or looking after a sick relative, which can all take their toll.

What happens when we are stressed?

When we are stressed our body releases chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline. These hormones are imperative for our survival, however if their levels are sustained for a prolonged period they will start to impact on our physical health and affect many different organs in our body.

Symptoms of stress

Symptoms of stress can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Indecisiveness
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Chronic muscle pain
  • Over or under eating
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Reflux
  • Increased risk of diabetes, heart conditions and stroke
  • Increased susceptibility to colds and viruses

Can exercise help with stress?

Yes! Exercise helps lower our blood pressure, reduce the levels of stress hormones in our body, improve our mood, our muscle flexibility and tone, as well as distracting us from other stressors and helping us to get a good night’s sleep.

Great forms of stress-busting exercise include classes such as Pilates, tai chi and yoga, which focus on breathing and flexibility of the body. They also give us the opportunity to ‘check in’ with ourselves and become more aware of how we are feeling physically and mentally. Whilst this gives us some much needed me-time, classes can also be a great social opportunity which is perfect for boosting our mood!

The ISMA (international stress management association) has come up with 7 positive ways to influence stress

1. Change the thought – Change the outcome

This is the starting point, reprogramming your brain by replacing an unhelpful negative thought or belief with a new positive one. Use your imagination to visualise or ‘show’ your brain what you want. The power of the mind cannot be over-estimated!

2. Self-belief starts with you

This is an empowering way of taking more control in your life rather than relying on others to make you feel good. Do something fun or caring for yourself today!

3. Don’t just do what you did last year

Repeating what you always do will bring you the same outcome unless others change & this is not in your control. So if you didn’t like all that happened last year make plans & set new goals, do something different!

4. Deal with difficult decisions now, not later

“Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today” We all know this but positive action is required to make it happen. Prioritize & do the difficult tasks first in the day so you have a clear focus for the rest of the day making you less stressed & more productive!

5. Find reasons to say “yes”

“I would love to but….” here comes the negative reason why you can’t! It can be a really positive experience to just say yes, if it is possible & what you want, then try to find ways that will allow you the opportunity, maybe you need others to persuade you, take control & decide for yourself!

6. Renegotiate

Stuck with what you have always had & now want a change? Look at learning to develop & use your assertive skills, ask for what you want, discuss your changing needs, expectations with yourself & others to reach the deal that works for you!

7. Flip it!

There are always two sides to every situation, sometimes more. Take time to look at all your options, don’t just assume, maybe ask others & make informed choices based on facts!

SaveSave


National Fitness Day 2018

Posted on 25th September 2018 by

This year’s National Fitness Day is on Wednesday 26th September and promises to continue to National Fitness Day 2018encourage the nation to celebrate the fun of fitness and physical activity across the UK.

As part of National Fitness Day, UK Active will be running a social media campaign – #Fitness2Me

#Fitness2Me aims to celebrate what fitness means to people, promoting that keeping physically active means something different to us all.

UK Active want to make #Fitness2Me the biggest movement in breaking down the barriers that stop people being active, showing that fitness is for everyone!

They hope that by encouraging people from all walks of life, activity levels, and interests to share what fitness means to them, it will inspire others to live healthier and happier lives through being active.

So if it is getting fit, getting happy, playing with grandkids, or connecting with pets, whatever it means to you we want to hear about it!

  • Simply grab a piece of paper and scribble down what Fitness Means 2 You
  • Then take a photo or capture a 60 second video to share with us on social media
  • Don’t forget to add #Fitness2Me and #FitnessDay and tag us via @FitnessDayUK

A major issue that people face when trying to increase activity levels, is overcoming perceived or actual barriers.

Here are some suggestions for overcoming barriers to physical activity.

Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers
Lack of time Identify available time slots. Monitor your daily activities for one week. Identify at least three 30-minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
Add physical activity to your daily routine. For example, walk or ride your bike to work or shopping, organise school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stairclimbing.
Social influence Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family. Ask them to support your efforts.
Invite friends and family members to exercise with you. Plan social activities involving exercise, like family walks or walk to a coffee shop with a friend.
Develop new friendships with physically active people. Join a group, such as a walking club.
Lack of energy Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel most energetic naturally.
Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level; then, try it.
Lack of motivation Plan ahead. Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it on your calendar.
Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
Join an exercise group or class.
Fear of injury Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health status.
Make sure you get any injuries checked out, so you have confidence to exercise without fear. 
Lack of skill Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs, or jogging.
Take a class to develop new skills.
Lack of resources Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, skipping, or free online classes.
Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community Park Run, Eastleigh Borough Council Activities, Health walks etc. 
Weather conditions Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor cycling, free online classes, indoor swimming,  stair climbing, skipping, dancing, yoga, etc.)
Travel Put a skipping rope in your suitcase and skip.
Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
Join a nationwide gym.
Visit the local shopping centre and walk for half an hour or more.
Bring your mp3 player your favorite aerobic exercise music.
Family obligations Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbour, or family member who also has small children.
Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, do an aerobic dance or exercise video for kids (there are several online) and exercise together. You can spend time together and still get your exercise.
True skipping, ride a stationary bicycle, or use other home gymnasium equipment while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g., during school hours or their nap time).
Retirement years Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less. Spend more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren. Children with short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, line dancing, or swimming.
Now that you have the time, make regular physical activity a part of every day. Go for a walk every morning or every evening before dinner. Treat yourself to an exercycle and ride every day while reading a favorite book or magazine.

SaveSave


Balance Awareness Week 2018

Posted on 19th September 2018 by

This week is Balance Awareness Week, a week to raise the awareness of the conditions that can affect Balance Awareness Week 2018 one’s balance and the importance of something we all too often take for granted.

Close your eyes and stand on one foot. It’s hard right? Now imagine having that same disoriented feeling on two feet, and with your eyes open. Balance is something most of us take for granted. It’s automatically hardwired into our bodies at birth, evolving and adapting as we grow and age. While basic balance is innate, some of us are able to perfect or even master our balance through exercise and practice. We don’t often think about our balance—until of course, we lose it.

There are many different reasons why balance can be a struggle. Some are linked to our vestibular system or inner ear, some can be neurological in origin, affecting our brain and nervous system.

The key reason for loss of balance we see here at goPhysio is ageing. As we age, we often experience a loss of strength and flexibility and a decline in our ability to balance as well. All too often, these are seen as an inevitable part of ageing, but this doesn’t have to be the case.

Balance is something you can train and improve.

Just like muscle strength and flexibility, you can and improve train your balance.

By improving balance, you will:

  • Reduce your risk of falling as you get older
  • Stay independent for longer
  • Keep enjoying being social and active

How can you improve your balance?

  • Do some regular exercises to train and challenge your balance safely. These can include standing on 1 leg, going up and down onto your tip toes, standing and closing your eyes, walking a ‘tightrope’ – please get in touch if you’d like more information about some great balance exercises.
  • Get out and about and keep mobile, walk on a variety of surfaces and terrains to challenge you!
  • Try some regular exercise classes with export support and guidance – our Pilates Classes and Active Ageing Classes are perfect.

Read More 

Keeping Active As We Age

Active Ageing Exercise Classes in Chandlers Ford

Why lean muscle mass is so important

Fall Proof – Exercises for older people

 

 


World Physical Therapy Day 2018

Posted on 8th September 2018 by

World Physical Therapy Day takes place every year on 8th September. The day is an opportunity for Physiotherapists (physical therapists) from all over the world to raise awareness about the crucial contribution the profession makes to keeping people well, mobile and independent.

Get Active. Stay Active. Talk to one of our Physiotherapists today.

The campaign message of World Physical Therapy Day 2018 is “Physical therapy and mental health”, demonstrating the role that physical therapy and physical activity has in mental health.

The campaign is focused around the following key messages:

  • Exercise as an evidence-based treatment for depression.
  • The role of physical therapists working with patients who may have mental health issues.
  • The benefits of physical activity in protecting against the emergence of depression.
  • How better outcomes are experienced when exercise is delivered by a qualified healthcare professional, such as a physiotherapist.
  • How people with mental health issues are more at risk of having poor physical health.

Here are some great infographics that summarise how mental health can be improved with exercise and the crucial role physiotherapists can have in supporting this.

World Physio Day 2018

World Physio Day mental health

SaveSave