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Charity Support

Posted on 7th February 2018 by

As a local small business, we get inundated throughout the year with requests for support for charity The Brain Tumour Charityand fundraising events. To date, we have provided much support to these very worthwhile causes and efforts, as and when we have been approached.

However, we have now decided that we are going to support a single charity for the year and focus all our fundraising efforts on this single charity.

For 2018, we have decided to support The Brain Tumour Charity. At the beginning of this year, the 11 year old son of a very dear friend of goPhysio’s founders was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Brain tumours only receive 1% of government research funds, yet it is the second most prevalent of childhood cancers. So, we have decided to focus our fundraising efforts on this charity for 2018.

As part of our role with the Eastleigh 10k event next month, we will be providing pre and post race massages. In exchange we will be taking donations towards our chosen charity.

We hope to have some additional fund raising events planned for the year.

In the meantime, if you would like to make a donation to The Brain Tumour Charity, you can do so here.

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Warming Up For Running – “Do I really need to?”

Posted on 8th January 2018 by

So, you’re ready for your next run. But before you set off, let’s consider the importance of a proper warm up.

If you’re an early morning runner and you’ve been led in bed all night, you’ll need to loosen up. Likewise, if you’ve been sat at work all day, you’ll need to prepare those joints and muscles for the physical activity that you’re about to put them through. Even if you have a physical job, getting yourself ready to run will not only improve your running performance, but it will help keep you free from injuries and increase your recovery rate.

So, warming up for a run is definitely important! But what’s the best way to warm up? 

Foam rolling

Love it or hate it, using a foam roller correctly has been proven to improve performance (1,2) and it’s a great way to prepare your muscles for running. From loosening up fascial adhesions to improving circulation, myofascial release with foam rolling is quick and effective and shouldn’t be left out of any warm up routine.

Using a foam roller (or a ball), stick to these six areas for the best whole-body release:

  1. Feet
  2. Calves
  3. Quadriceps
  4. Tensor fascia lata/TFL (hip flexor at the front of your hip)
  5. Lats (run from your armpit down the side of your body)
  6. Pectoral (chest).

Spending 60-90 seconds rolling each area will improve blood flow, release tension and will help identify any sore areas that may need some extra attention. If you’re not sure exactly what to do with your from roller or would like to learn how to use it effectively, why not some along to one of our foam roller workshops.

Mobility

How healthy are your joints? Simply moving a joint through its full range of motion will increase lubrication, open capillaries, improve circulation and facilitate coordination. Focus on your ankles, knees, hips and lower back. Here are some simple mobility exercises that you might do as part of your warm up.

Ankles: circle in each direction. Point the toes and bring them back towards the shins.

Knees: standing heel kicks to facilitate bending and extending the knees.

Hips: rotate one leg at a time in outward circles, before changing direction. Try to keep the circles as big as possible, as to challenge the full range of motion at the joint. Hold on to something if you’re balance isn’t great.

Lower back: laying on your back, bring both knees to your chest, squeeze and relax. Also try taking your right leg over to the left side with a bent knee to encourage rotation. Repeat on the other side.

Stretching 

Perform a few dynamic stretches after your mobility work. Dynamic means that you are stretching through moment (not holding a stretch).

Great examples of dynamic stretches include:

  • Forward lunge with a torso rotation.
  • Forward lunge with a torso side bend.
  • Bringing alternate knees to the chest and squeezing.
  • Alternating high kicks with a (fairly) straight leg.
  • Hamstring stretches with an arm scoop whilst gently walking forwards.

Try to avoid static stretching before physical activity. Research has shown that it can in fact be detrimental to athletic performance (3,4,5).

Muscle activation

Getting the right muscles firing before your run can help to maintain balance, symmetry and prevent injuries from occurring.

These exercises are fab for activating the muscles you need for running:

  • Calves: heels raises, skipping.
  • Quadriceps: lunges, bodyweight squats, tuck jumps.
  • Hamstrings: heel kicks.
  • Glutes: crab walks, side-to-side shuffles, or backwards shuttle runs.

Running backwards is a great way of activating those big gluteal muscles which continue to work when you turn around and run forwards (just make sure you’re in a hazard-free environment to prevent any unwanted falls).

Having your glutes activated will stabilise your hips, you’ll have greater propulsion when pushing off and your knees will be less inclined to fall in every time you plant your front foot. Not only will this make you a more efficient runner, but it will help prevent hip, knee and ankle overuse injuries from occurring.

So, here’s a summary for a runner’s guide to a quick, efficient warm up:

  • Foam Rolling – Quick six; feet, calves, quadriceps, TFL, lats and pecs.
    60-90 seconds on each, then move on.
  • Mobility Work – Move each joint through its full range of motion. Include ankles, knees, hips, lower back.
  • Dynamic Stretches – Active stretching with movement.
  • Muscle Activation – Calves, quadriceps, hamstrings and glutes.
  • Backwards running will help with your forward running.

References

  1. Peacock CA, Krein DD, Silver TA, Sanders GJ, von Carlowitz KPA. An acute bout of self-myofascial release in the form of foam rolling improves performance testing. Int J Exerc Sci. 2014;7:202-211.
  2. Monteiro et al. Acute effects of different self-massage volumes on the FMS overhead deep squat performance. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2017; 12(1): 94-104.
  3. Chatzopoulos D., Galazoulas C., Patikas D., Kotzamanidis C. (2014) Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 13(2), 403-409.
  4. Lowery RP et al. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance. J Strength Cont Res. 2014; 28(1): 161-7.
  5. Costa PB, Ryan ED, Herda TJ, Walter AA, Defreitas JM, Stout JR, Cramer JT. Acute effects of static stretching on peak torque and the hamstrings-to-quadriceps conventional and functional ratios. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013;23:38–45.

Open Day Success!

Posted on 19th September 2017 by

We had a fantastic day on Saturday, as we welcomed so many people through our doors to experience many of the different services we have on offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, meet our team and find out more about our lifesaving defibrillator.

Visitors on the day took part in Pilates classes, our Active Backs classes for people who want to gain confidence again exercising with back pain, Positive Steps classes for the later years of life and Yoga with Marianne.

We were also delighted to offer free sports massage taster sessions, free injury advice clinics with our Physiotherapists & Sports Therapists and carried out lots of computerised foot analyses.

Linda, a local community first responder, kindly offered some basic CPR training and dispelled many myths about using a public access defibrillator.

It was wonderful meeting so many local people. Thank you for your support!

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open DaygoPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

 

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Low Back Pain & Sciatica – The Latest NICE Guidelines

Posted on 20th January 2017 by

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recently published new guidelines on best management of low back pain. This includes both people with ‘simple’ back pain (localised to the back) and those with referred pain (sciatica) which can affect the nerves down one leg. These guidelines are based on latest evidence and expert analysis of what is the best course of action for people with low back pain.

Here’s how we’re putting them into practice at goPhysio

Assessment

When you come to see us with back pain we will do a thorough assessment by asking a number of questions to find out more about your pain and to rule out any ‘red flag’ conditions. These red flags can indicate serious pathology such as cancer, infection, trauma, inflammatory conditions or Cauda Equina Syndrome. Thankfully these conditions are rare but if we have any suspicion we will referral you on to the appropriate speciality for further investigations without delay.

We will do a complete back examination to assess how the joints, muscles and nerves are functioning. We know there are a number of factors that can influence your recovery both positively and negatively so our staff are undergoing further training on use of the STarT Back Risk Assessment tool. This will help us identify those who are at risk of poorer outcomes and ensure that we tailor our treatment to address these factors.

Treatment

Self-management education is a vital aspect of treatment for any patient. We help you to understand why you have pain and what steps you can take to reduce it – both during an acute flare up of pain but also long term strategies or simple changes you can make to your lifestyle which will help your back.

Your treatment will vary depending on the nature and cause of your pain, how severe it is and a variety of individual factors. Physiotherapy treatment may include manual therapy such as joint mobilisations or massage, alongside a personal exercise programme and advice on pain relief.

Research has shown that anti-inflammatory medications (NSAID’s) such as Ibruprofen or Naproxen are much better than paracetamol for back pain, however, for people that are unable to take NSAID’s or that find them ineffective, weak opioid medications such as Co-codamol can be recommended for simple back pain.

For acute sciatica your GP may recommend stronger ‘neuropathic’ pain medications which are much better for nerve pain (tingling/burning/shooting pain). Please note all medications have side effects and can interact with other medications you are already on or other conditions that you may have so please check with your GP or a pharmacist before taking any new medication.

What happens if you are not responding to treatment?

For acute sciatica you may be referred on to a spinal consultant, who in more severe cases can consider epidural injections or a spinal decompression surgery. However it is important to remember that this is never a first course of action as most episodes of sciatica resolve within 6-12 weeks. Your physio will help you decide when it is appropriate to be referred on depending on how you respond and recover.

Sometimes there are psychological factors affecting your rehabilitation such as depression, anxiety or other mood disorders. In this case your physio may recommend that you are referred on to a psychologist for cognitive-behavioural therapy. This is because we know that people with negative mood and health beliefs rarely respond well to usual treatment without first addressing these factors.

So if your pain is persistent or not responding to usual treatment it is important to seek professional help.

What about x-rays and scans?

X-rays are no longer routine for lower back pain unless there is the suspicion of a fracture (such as after a severe trauma or in people with osteoporosis). This is because it exposes you to radiation but does not often provide any useful information on how we should best treat your back. Likewise MRI’s are only needed to rule out serious spinal pathology or to help a consultant identify if a nerve in your back is being significantly compressed to warrant injection or surgery. The vast majority of this information your physio will be able to deduct from a thorough assessment.

Once an acute episode of back pain has eased off, we recommend continuing with exercise to help keep any further recurrences at bay. Research indicates that any form of exercise is great for people who’ve had back pain – being active and moving helps! many of our patients go on to our specialist Pilates classes. These are particularly beneficial as they are taken by our Physiotherapists, so they are well equipped to deal with any concerns or issues you may have with your back and can modify and progress the exercises for you individually. The classes are also small, so you aren’t lost in a sea of people struggling – you get individual care and attention. We run 16 classes a week, so there’s plenty of choice to fit in with your weekly commitments.

NICE back pain

If you’re suffering with back pain and want some peace of mind and reassurance that it’s nothing serious and help to get on the road to recovery, come and see one of our Physio’s at goPhysio. We make it easy for you, with appointments available 8am – 8pm and Saturday mornings, we can normally offer you an appointment within 24 hours, if not the same day. Just call one of our friendly Patient Services Team on 023 8025 3317 or book an appointment online.


Why Is Rehabilitation Pilates different to other Pilates Classes?

Posted on 12th June 2016 by

Pilates classes are a big part of what we offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford. However, the Pilates classes we run at goPhysio are a little different to others you may experience in the area. Our Pilates is in essence ‘Rehabilitation Pilates’.

Rehabilitation Pilates is different to a traditional class you may attend at the gym or local hall.

Physio Pilates Chandlers FordRehabilitation Pilates has been specifically developed for use by physiotherapists.  All of our instructors are both Charted Physiotherapists and are trained by the Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute (APPI), which is the world leader in rehabilitation Pilates.

Rehabilitation Pilates exercises target the deep postural muscles of the tummy and spine to improve central ‘core stability’ & posture. They also help improve spinal mobility, increase flexibility of the key trunk and leg muscle groups and improve body and postural awareness. This type of Pilates is particularly suitable for you if you suffer with back or neck pain or have suffered a specific injury. It is also a great way of preventing injuries or preparing for sport.

People who come along to our Pilates classes tend to fall into one of 5 categories:

  1. They’ve had an injury and have been seeing us for Physiotherapy. Once they are nearing recovery, they start with Pilates to both continue their recovery and help improve their physical ability to stop the injury coming back.
  2. They have been advised to start Pilates by another health care practitioner (e.g. Consultant or GP) and want to join a Physio led class to make sure they have the right support in the class and adequately experienced Instructor.
  3. They’ve suffered with back or neck pain (or other injuries) on and off for years and have heard Pilates is great to stop it re-occurring.
  4. They’ve been to another Pilates class elsewhere but felt that the class size was too big and they weren’t getting enough attention or support from the instructor. We even have people who’ve picked up an injury at other classes from doing Pilates incorrectly.
  5. They’ve just heard wonderful things about Pilates and want to experience the benefits too in a friendly, supportive environment!

As our instructors are also Physiotherapist, you have ‘on hand’ expertise ready to share their knowledge and advice at every class. They have such an extensive knowledge of the human body and also injury, so can tailor each class to the individual needs and make sure you really get the most out of it for you. The classes only ever have a maximum of 8 participants, so you are always under the watchful eye to make sure you’re doing the exercises correctly and be progressed when needed.

We also run 2 specialist Pilates classes for pregnant ladies and also new mums and their babies.

There is a real skill in getting the Pilates exercises right and this needs concentration, guidance and attention.

Take a look at our class timetable to see the classes we run at goPhysio.

Questions we’re often asked about our classes

How many people come to the Pilates classes? The numbers for each class are strictly limited to a maximum of 8. This is to ensure that we maintain a high quality class, with the instructor being able to give sufficient attention & support to each individual.

How do I book onto a Pilates class? If you want to join our classes you can give us a call at the clinic on 02380253317 or email us. We’ll help find the most suitable class for you, we’ll can chat through the booking process and organise payment for the class. Alternatively, If you are currently attending goPhysio, chat to your Physio or our Reception team, who can organise for you to attend a class.

How much do the classes cost? We normally run our courses in 8 week blocks. The cost of each 8 week course is £100.

Why do I need a 1-2-1 before I start Pilates? We do advocate that if you haven’t seen us at goPhysio before you have a 30 minute 1-to-1 pilates session, before joining a class. This will enable our Pilates Instructor to help you to get 110% out of your Pilates! This is norma;l procedure for anyone starting a Physio led Pilates course. These 1-2-1 appointments cost £35.

Pilates Classes Chandlers Ford