Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Celebrating the Eastleigh 10k

Posted on 18th June 2018 by

The Brain Tumour Charity
If you’d like to donate to our chosen charity for your race day massage, please click here. Thank you.

Sunday 17th June finally arrived for the postponed Hendy Eastleigh 10k event. And what a fantastic event it was!

Hat’s off to Steve and his team for pulling together such a well organised event. The friendly, supportive & positive atmosphere was palpable. Seeing all of the local running clubs in their club shirts getting together for pre-race photos and supporting each other was really amazing.

goPhysio felt honoured to have been invited to be part of the event. We were on hand from 7.15am providing pre and post race massages. Our dedicated team of Physio’s, Sports Therapists and Massage Practitioners worked tirelessly and massaged over 150 runners during the morning, as well as providing lot’s of advice and injury help to those with questions or concerns.

We met so many fantastic runners and their supporters throughout the morning. Many had never had sports massage before and commented how much better they felt after it! Some came for a massage both before and after the race.

It sounded like a great run for many, in wonderful conditions, so many people came in celebrating new PB’s. For some it was their first ever 10k, such a great sense of achievement!

 Eastleigh 10k goPhysio massage  goPhysio Team shot at Eastleigh 10k 2018  

Busy goPhysio at Eastleigh 10k  Eastleigh 10k runners massage

We were delighted to be raising money at the event for our chosen charity this year, The Brain Tumour Charity. Thank you so much to all of those who kindly donated on the day. If you came along for a massage and would like to donate, you can do so here online.

Special Offers!

Just a reminder that all race pack special offers from goPhysio have been extended to 31st July. If you quote EASTLEIGH10K you can take advantage of the following:

  • 20% off Sports Therapy Assessments and Treatments (45 minute assessment normally £68 offer price £54.40 / 30 minute treatment normally £48 offer price £38.40)
  • 20% off Sports Massage (60 minutes normally £55 offer price £44 / 30 minutes normally £40 offer price £32)
  • Free Pilates 1-2-1 worth £40

You can use these offers as many times as you like, so if you’ve picked up an injury or want a niggle looked at, take advantage of seeing one of our Sports Therapists. If you’ve had taster of the benefits of sports massage, why not set some time aside for a full appointment. If you’ve heard what wonders Pilates can do for your running – now’s your chance to give it a try! You can book an appointment by calling us on 023 8025 3317 or booking directly online 24/7 here.

Eastleigh 10k Winner
A well deserved massage for the winner of the Eastleigh 10k 2018

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Eastleigh 10k Selfie Competition

Posted on 7th June 2018 by

Share a ‘Selfie’ of yourself at the Hendy Eastleigh 10k on Sunday 17th June 2018 alongside the goPhysio logo with the #GOPHYSIO and you could be in with a chance to win a 1 hour sports massage or place on one of our foam roller workshops!

Eastleigh 10k Selfie Competition Image

All you need to do is:

  1. Take a ‘Selfie’ alongside the goPhysio logo anywhere at the event – this could include whilst you’re having a massage, talking to one of our team or alongside our logo anywhere you might find it!
  2. Post your selfie on either Twitter, Facebook or Instagram and make sure you use the hashtag #GOPHYSIO by the end of race day (midnight 17.06.18)
  3. 2 winners from across all 3 social media channels will be picked at random to win a 1 hour sports massage or a place on one of our foam roller workshops.
  4. Winners wil be notified via social media on Monday 18th June.

T&Cs

  • All selfies much be posted on social media by midnight on 17.06.18
  • All selfies must include the hashtag #GOPHYSIO within the accompanying text
  • All selfies must clearly show the goPhysio logo
  • All offers are subject to availability
  • The 3 social media channels that are included in this competition are Twitter, Facebook and Instagram
  • Prizes can not be exchanged for cash
  • We reserve the right to exclude any person from participating in the competition on reasonable grounds
  • We reserve the right to end the competition or to amend these terms and conditions at any time without prior notice

SaveSave

SaveSave


Runners! When injury strikes, what do you do? We’d like to find out more!

Posted on 27th April 2018 by

Running project goPhysio

TAKE THE SURVEY HERE!

We work with hundreds of runners, from couch to 5k enthusiasts just starting out their running journey to ultra marathon runners. We more often than not see them to help, when pain or injury has impacted on what they love to do – run! However, we know that so many runners who are injured seek other sources of help to get them back running after an injury.

Are you a runner who’s been injured in the last year or so? If so, goPhysio are interested to hear more about your experiences and what matters most to you. Many runners ask a fellow runner for injury advice, take a ‘wait and see approach’ or do their own research online with mixed results. goPhysio are interested in finding out more about your frustrations and successes when an injury gets in the way of your love of running.

So, if you have 5 minutes to spare, please click on this link to tell us more about your experiences.

Many thanks.

SaveSave

SaveSave


goRUN10 – New Running Training Programme to get you to 10k

Posted on 26th March 2018 by

goRun10 10 Running ProgrammeNew Training Programme to get you to 10k!

We are delighted to be teaming up with Mike Chambers, from Next Step Running, to offer you a fully supported run coaching programme, to get you beyond 5k!

With a new Eastleigh 10k date, this is the perfect chance to refocus and get the expert support and guidance to run 10k!

Achieve your goals! Learn lifelong running skills!

Book your place online here! 


What does the programme include?

This unique programme is the perfect combination of a practical running programme with an experienced, qualified coach alongside an informative schedule of educational and practical sessions, structured to support your long term running journey.

The programme will run on a Wednesday evening from 6.30 – 8pm.

Week 1, 11the April –  Introduction to the running programme & getting to know you. This will include what to expect from the programme, outline of the training plan and a gauge of where you all are, so that the programme can be tailored accordingly. We will cover some key important issues in running, so that you can get the most from the programme and maintain lifelong love of running!

Weeks 2 – 9, 25th April – 13th June – These weekly sessions will include a 1 hour supervised run, including not only running but drills, technique, strength and conditioning work and more. There will also be a 30minute practical or educational workshop, covering a different topic each week. These sessions will include the following:

  • Warm up and cool down – dynamic stretching vs static stretching – why & how.
  • 10k Training – key components – interval training, threshold & tempo runs, hills, the long run and running easy.
  • Tapering and last week preparation.
  • Strength training for runners.
  • Foam rolling for runners.
  • Race day – hydration & fuelling, pacing for 10k, post race recovery
  • Pilates for runners.
  • Managing load & capacity, making sure you avoid injury.

By adding this unique, educational element, to your running programme, you will benefit from being able to ‘run better’ – avoiding injuries, achieving your goals and loving your running!

Why would I benefit from a supported running coach programme?

With access to so many online training plans, running apps, free running groups and with running training programmes in every magazine, Running Coaching can be seen as a luxury only needed for elite level athletes. Surely everyone can run anyway? It’s just a matter of how fast and how far! You just need a pair of trainers!

But think again! Recreational runners arguably benefit more from a structured running programme with a qualified, experienced Running Coach than those club level racing snakes!

Too many runners do the same run several times a week, run too hard too often, plateau and / or pick up an injury. These issues can really hamper enjoyment of running and progress and often cause people to give up on running. With the right education, guidance and support, we can help you avoid this.

Having a structured programme with a Coach will motivate you, challenge you when they think you can give more, but more often than not recognise when you need to back off and take it easy!  A Coach will structure your week so you include all the key components to make you a fitter, stronger and faster runner.

How much is the programme?

The 9 week programme costs £79. This will include:

  • Week 1 introductory session
  • Bespoke 8 week training programme based on 3 sessions per week
    • 8 x 1.5 hour weekly sessions with the Running Coach & goPhysio
    • 2 x homework sessions to do with the rest of your group or on your own in between
  • Support on creating more variety in your running, including hill sessions,interval training and strength & conditioning work, with lots of support and tips to help you build strength and speed throughout the sessions
  • Email support throughout the programme
  • 10% off at goPhysio for Physiotherapy, Sports Therapy or Sports Massage, should you need it

Who is this for?

This programme is suitable for those who are able to run at least 5k. Maybe you’re a Parkrun regular but aren’t sure how to get to the next level. You may have signed up to the Eastleigh 10k but heaved a sigh of relief when it got postponed as you weren’t ready. Maybe you’ve run comfortably on your own but now want some extra support in a group environment. Or it might be you’ve recently returned to running from an injury and want to make sure you are armed with the right skills and knowledge so you don’t get injured again?

Places are limited, please book your place here or to find out more or if you have any questions, email fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Top 10K Recovery Tips from goPhysio

Posted on 16th March 2018 by

Well done! You’ve completed your 10k race! If you’re a 10k regular, you may have learnt the bast way to tackle post race recovery. But for some, it may be your first 10k event. What you do after an event can really help or hinder your recovery and set you on the right path for continuing your running journey!

Not sure what is best to do to help your recovery. Well don’t worry, here are goPhysio’s top tips for your recovery:

  1. Cool Down – you cross the finish line and the last thing you want to do is keep moving, but a gentle jog or walk will help to steadily slow down your heart rate and allow the build up of waste products in the muscles to be flushed out.
  2. Hydration – Keeping hydrated is essential to allow the muscle to stay elastic and malleable; after all your muscle are made up of up to 70% water.
  3. Refuel – within 30 mins of your race it is important to refuel with a small meal high in carbohydrates and protein. This will help to prevent the onset of muscle soreness as this is the optimal time that the body will use the carbohydrates to rebuild glycogen stores.
  4. Rest– after you have celebrated running your 1st,5th,15th 10km race, get an early night. Sleep is when our body heals, so it is important to give your body the best chance of healing those sore muscles and giving you the best recovery.
  5. Active Recovery – The day after your 10k race try to get your body moving, go for a walk, swim, cycle or even a light jog. This will get you heart pumping increasing circulation around the body continuing to flush out any waste products (lactic acid).
  6. Massage – Book yourself a sports massage. You have trained hard and reached your goal of running the 10km so why not treat yourself to a recovery massage the day after the race. This will help relax those tight muscles, increase the blood flow to the muscle and help prevent DOMS. Don’t forget to take advantage of our race day offers, you can get 20% off your sports massage until 30th April.
  7. Listen to your body – if your feeling sore a day or two after your run then try to listen to your body and what it needs. Take your time to get back into your running routine.
  8. Celebrate – you’ve done it, what a great achievement! Be proud of yourself and celebrate what you’ve achieved. Whether it’s your first 10k or one of many, well done from us all at goPhysio!

Eastleigh 10k – 10 day countdown with Next Step Running & goPhysio

Posted on 9th March 2018 by

After a somewhat unexpected and disruptive week of snow, it has been nice to see a return to the normality of early spring…lovely to see the sun and of course rain and near impossible to do a run without thinking you have too many / too few layers on!

The run up to the Eastleigh 10k always includes a daily weather watch and such is our British weather in March there is no guessing what the weather will be on the day. Hint of summer sun…or return to biting winds and rain?? We will see.

Last night, we were joined by Running Coach, Mike Chambers from Next Step Running and 13 keen runners who have signed up for the 2018 installment of the ever growing and popular Eastleigh 10k road race, to talk through their last 10 days preparation…and yes this included the weather!

Mike has kindly written this guest blog post for us.

The evening began with introductions with a mixed audience of first time 10k runners through to the more experienced runners in the hunt for a new PB. But what unites all us runners is the thirst for information to improve your running and the mind games that go on in your head in those final few days.

We talked through dealing with nerves, trying to get the whole thing in some perspective compared with the really important things in our lives….and could we all run a little bit more like Eluid Kipchoge…not as fast but at least with a smile on our face!

Tapering

One of the hot topics of debate for this evening (and every evening you spend with a group of runners) was focused on the last week of training and tapering before a key race. The greatest fear among many new runners is getting to the start line tired from training in the last week, but in my experience, backing off too much is more likely to leave you feeling flat come the big day. Our bodies crave routine, so just take out some of the volume (30%), just tweak the intensity down a notch and keep the same number of running days….and don’t go to Ikea the day before race day! Easy runs with ‘race pace’ strides (4 or 5 x 30 second bursts) or even ‘pick up’ miles at the end on your easy runs is a simple taper for new runners over a 10k distance. This will keep your body in tune with the pace needed on the day, without digging too deep.

Food

And of course we talked about food! In a world of super foods and diet programmes and get fit quick solutions, I like to keep things simple. As long as you are eating a sensible balanced diet, keep to it, no major changes and no major carb load! The small taper in your training in the last week will act as a carb load if you maintain your usual diet. Yes, to a carb based meal the night before, but more importantly, graze through Saturday with little and often approach to snacks. And we tried to dispel myths and one claim on the night that new research suggested you don’t need any carbs at all!

Hydration

Make sure your body is hydrated through those last few days, and don’t go chugging water Sunday morning…you will feel heavy…and be in a long queue for the toilet. Keep up some electrolyte in take through a sports drink on the day. Gels – realistically unless running over 70-80 minutes for the 10k, you wont need fueling during the race, your body will have all the glycogen stores you need to fire you to the finish.

Race Day Prep

Most runners I know are creatures of habit and getting the timetable right on the day is critical to avoid a full meltdown! This works best by working backwards from the race start time, breakfast around 2 hours before this. Thinking through travel and parking on the day. Kit laid out day before (OK, I will be honest, I have laid my kit out at least 3 days before!!). Race number pinned on and check and double check have everything you need…..remember the weather…this could be vest or t shirt, but equally we may be looking at base layer, hat and gloves. A layer to keep on to the very last minute also worth having.

Race day is about trusting in your training and committing to what you set out to do, be it just get round or chasing that PB. Visualise achieving your goal, crossing the line and getting the medal and t-shirt will help you to make that your reality.

Next Step Running LogoSo, to all of you doing your first 10k, chasing a new PB or whatever your motivation for getting out there on race day, smile, commit to your pace and the very best of luck.

Mike Chambers, Running Coach

Next Step Running 

 


Overuse Injuries

Posted on 12th February 2018 by

What is an overuse injury?

An overuse injury is normally a chronic injury that gradually occurs over a period of time, rather than a sudden acute traumatic injury. Repetitive trauma to a muscle, joint, ligament or tendon such as a tendinopathy or stress fracture are just a couple of examples of overuse injuries.

What causes overuse injuries?

Overuse injuries are often linked to training overload in athletes, or sudden changes in activities that put stress through the body which they are not used to and therefore overload the soft tissue or bone. When we take up a new hobby, sport or activity or increase training levels/load this will put increased stress onto our body, this will lead the body having to adapt. However, if the body is not given time to adapt and the body is overloaded then this can, in some cases, lead to repetitive ‘microtrauma’ to the tissues. This can be unnoticed for a long time, or thought to be just a muscle ache. Some causes of this include:

  • Poor Technique
  • Muscle imbalances
  • Training overload/level
  • Biomechanics of your foot

What might it feel like?

Depending on the affected tissue or body part will depend on how it will feel. Common symptoms include:

  • Pain that starts initially during a warm up that then eases of and returns at the end of your sport or activity
  • Consistent pinching or sharp pain on specific movements
  • Constant dull ache

How do the symptoms progress?

Overuse injuries can be slow in developing and last a long time. The longer the problem is ignored the worse or more frequent the symptoms can become. This may lead to pain every time you engage in your sport or activity and may also lead to pain/swelling afterwards.

How is it diagnosed?

If you think you may be suffering with an overuse injury, it is important to get an assessment by a physiotherapist or sports therapist. The key to effective management of an overuse injury is accurately identifying exactly what’s causing it and addressing this. This will help to prevent any of those niggles turning into a bigger problem and possibly preventing you doing the sport of activity that you love.

What is the best treatment for overuse injuries?

There are lots of treatments that can be used to help, depending on the injury. Treatment will often start with easing the symptoms of the injury, such as pain and inflammation. In parallel to this, addressing the underlying cause and working on strength and stability to prevent reoccurence is key. Treatments may include:

Outlook

When the underlying issue is addressed and appropriate changes are made, overuse injuries can be solved. They can often be a very frustrating injury, as they inevitably need a bit of rest and trial and error to work out exactly what’s causing the issue. That’s where we come in, seeing an expert can guide you through the puzzle of injury and help get you back doing what you love as quickly and painlessly as possible.

Read More 

Achilles Injuries

Running injuries – The basic principles

Treatment of calf pain in runners

Runners knee (patellofemoral pain)

What’s physiotherapy got to do with a dripping tap?


 


Selective Rest – When to rest and when to keep running?

Posted on 6th February 2018 by

“Should I keep running or not?” is a question we get asked a lot by runners here at goPhysio.

There are many factors that can lead to injury from excessive training loads, running technique, poor foot mechanics and muscle imbalances, to name a few. But, whatever the cause of your pain or injury total rest is rarely advocated, as this will, in general, only slow down your progress and can cause many more secondary, longer term issues.

At goPhysio, we prefer the term ‘selective rest’

This means to selectively rest from the aggravating (pain causing) activities. So, if you’ve got an ankle injury and you’re a keen runner, it is usually better to rest from running until you’re recovering but gentle walking and alternative non-aggravating activities such as swimming or cycling to maintain movement and fitness can be really helpful.

Essentially, your body’s tissues (muscle, tendon, ligaments and bone) will adapt to the demands you place upon them. When you rest the muscles may tighten and weaken, joints will stiffen and your whole body will also de-condition. The long term effects of complete rest will often prolong injuries, with you suffering unnecessary secondary complications and time off running due to inactivity. We’re designed to move, hence movement and exercise is therapeutic.

So, if you’re feeling the odd niggle or pain when you run, our top tips to help keep you running are:

  • Pain during a run? If you feel pain during your run and it is getting worse throughout your run then stop. Make a mental note of the distance or duration at which the pain started (that becomes the point you’ll use to gauge progress on your next run). Avoid running for the next 48 hours, use ice and anti-inflammatories to help settle any inflammation. Then attempt another run within 2-3 days, running to the point at which you felt your pain on your previous run. If you make it to that point and beyond great, just gently progress your running over the next few weeks, ensuring you don’t progress more than 10% distance or mileage in any one run.
    However, if the pain and distance is the same or worse than you experienced on your previous run, it will be indicative of an overuse injury. So, stop and seek an expert physiotherapy assessment to identify, modify and remove all the predisposing factors, to get you back to running quickly.
  • Rest days are training days If your training/distance has been increasing and you feel your legs are finding it hard to reach your planned distance it may be time to rest to allow your body to recover and repair. This selective rest will allow yourself to continue progressing whilst also preventing injury. Intersperse running with other activities such as swimming, cycling, Pilates, yoga or strength training. These activities will allow your body to recover from the repetitive, high loading forces of running but will still help with your running training in other ways.
  • Listen to your body It’s important to use common sense and listen to your body. We all experience natural aches and pains during running, due to the natural high loading forces of the activity. These symptoms are often one-off red-herrings, that subside within 24hrs. However if the pain is sharp in nature and doesn’t feel quite right, or persist’s for a few runs, it’s your body warning you that something is wrong and you need help.
  • If in doubt, see a specialist By seeing a specialist like a Physiotherapist or graduate Sports Therapist when you have an injury, we’ll be able to reassure you what you should and shouldn’t be doing to help your recovery. We spend a long time with you 1-2-1 to fully understand your problem and answer all your questions. You’ll go away knowing exactly what is wrong with you and exactly how to help it get better. There’s nothing worse than sitting around worrying about what may be wrong and whether you’re doing the right thing. We’ll help alleviate your fears and the result is a speedier recovery, getting back to running pain-free quicker, without the worry of the unknown.

Good Luck & Enjoy your Running!

The Injured Runner Project
We are trying to find out more about what injured runners do to get back to pain-free running, and would love to hear from you! If you’re interested in helping us out, please take a few moments to answer a couple of questions by clicking on this image. Many thanks.

Change just 1 thing to boost your running performance

Posted on 4th February 2018 by

Learn from the expert’s – here’s 5 great short cuts to rapidly improving your running performance, it’s not cheating honest! Just focus on 1 and see if it helps. From our Clinical Director, Paul.

1. The HOKA Difference: I regularly and happily recommend HOKA trainers to all my patients that require improved shock absorption and reduced tissue loading when running. They involve marshmallow, rocking chair and bucket seat technology!

To me, a clinician, they’re a unique mash up of styles, designed to simply and easily improve your shock absorption, comfort, running gait and foot stability. They are designed with only a 4mm rise from heel-to- toe, with a slight rocker shaped sole, to help with midfoot strike and smooth propulsion. Think ‘barefoot running’ style with comfy shock absorbent trainers on. The best of both world’s! So get down to your local running store and test drive a pair today. Read more about Hoka’s here. You can read more about the importance of running footwear here.

You’ll feel 10 years younger & 20kg lighter – I know I did!

2. Heel to Buttocks: Essentially it’s about improving the efficiency of your running style, by spending as much of your energy as possible in the propulsion phase. Avoiding long strides in-front of your body and the increased ground reaction forces, in this inefficient deceleration phase of running.

It’s about switching on your large propulsion muscles (gluteals and hamstring) at the end of your long levers (legs) and pushing off optimally through your big toe. It’s easier done, then you may think, just think of the cue “heel to buttocks”. So as you jog along bring your heels up towards your buttocks, and lean your trunk forwards, be prepared to getting faster as you go!

3. Pump with the arms & the legs will follow: To improve speed for that sprint finish, if you pump fast with your arms, your legs will automatically move faster. It’s the way we’re neurologically wired for reciprocal movement and the pro’s have been using it for years.

4. Sleep Better: Ensure you get approx at least 7-8 hours of sleep each night especially in the midst of a running training programme, to allow your body to recover and achieve the full benefits of training. Walker (2017), in his book ‘Why we sleep’ explains that there is a significant increase in the risk of injury with a lack of sleep.

There is no better insurance policy to mitigate the risk of injury than sleep!

Walker also explains that If your consistently not getting adequate sleep, less than 6 hour per night, you will not gain the full benefits from a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise and good nutrition. He concludes that “Sleep is one of the most sophisticated, potent and powerful – not to mention legal – performance enhancer’s everyone should be using fully”. So do yourself a favour a ensure you get – 8 hours of sleep each night!. Read more about the ‘Magic Elixir’ of sleep for runners here.

5. Maintain a Healthy Weight: A shortcut to making the most of what you’ve got is to maintain a healthy weight. For middle aged, social, fun runners it is by far the biggest contributor to easily increasing speed, distance, enjoyment whilst reducing the risk of injury. An average rule is that for every 2-3 kg lost you’ll easily improve your mile pace by a minute.


Why Pilates is great for runners

Posted on 25th January 2018 by

Pilates is a mainly mat based, body-conditioning routine designed to increase physical endurance, flexibility, posture, co-ordination, and core strength. It involves focused, controlled movements that can be modified to create different levels of difficulty.

Pilates was developed by a German, Joseph Pilates, in the early 1900’s as a form of exercise for soldiers recovering from injuries in WW1. He then adapted it for use by gymnasts and dancers. This form of Pilates is known as ‘traditional’. There are a host of other types of Pilates too, including Reformer Pilates, which utilises equipment and resistance techniques.

At goPhysio, we teach the APPI method, which is a form of clinical Pilates. The APPI Method is a research based, clinical application of improving the way a person moves and functions in their everyday life. The traditional Pilates exercises have been broken down into clearly defined levels to ensure a standard, gradual progression towards normal, functional movement. This also helps to build a strong foundation to build and progress your core strength on. The core cylinder, the focus of all Pilates movements, consists of the four abdominal groups (external oblique, internal oblique, rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis), the three lower back groups (psoas major, quadratus lumborum, spinalis) as well as the muscles of the buttocks, hips and pelvis.

The core

The ‘core’ plays a key part for any sport – in running, the main purpose is to stabilise and support the spine and trunk, providing a strong centre for the transfer of forces. It helps to make the dynamic leg movements as efficient as possible. Strong core muscles also help to maintain good posture to maximise performance and minimise injury. Reduced core stability can cause excess movement in the trunk, through over rotation. This can lead to a poor running form, which in turn leads to increased fatigue and reduced performance potential. This is due to energy being wasted in the form of excess movement and poor control.

Pilates also has many other benefits for runners

  • Helps to identify any weaknesses that inhibit your gait. It will provide you with muscular cues to help you fire and strengthen muscles that help you maintain a better running posture, which in turn will reduce the risk of injury and overuse.
  • A strong, balanced body helps you maintain proper form as you fatigue. Pilates helps you loosen your hips, legs and back, all helping you keep a fluid, long stride.
  • Pilates can decrease your recovery time after injury or a strenuous workout by increasing joint mobility, improving flexibility and body awareness.
  • Pilates breathing encourages you to use the diaphragm and control your inhalation/exhalations to assist with movement – this translates into better control during running.
  • Pilates helps to improve hip, pelvic and lumbar spine mobility & flexibility, through the movements and stretches.

We run over 20 classes a week at the clinic and even though they are aren’t targeted specifically at runners, it would be a great addition to your training regime to help with core strength, balance and improved mobility & flexibility.

Pilates Exercises for runners

Read More 

Read more about Clinical Pilates

Take a look at our latest Pilates timetable

Our top 6 Pilates exercises for runners

The Injured Runner Project
We are trying to find out more about what injured runners do to get back to pain-free running, and would love to hear from you! If you’re interested in helping us out, please take a few moments to answer a couple of questions by clicking on this image. Many thanks.

SaveSave