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The Elephant In The Room – MSK Conditions

Posted on 17th October 2018 by

Musculoskeletal conditions: the elephant in the room?MSK Conditions

Conditions of the bones, joints and muscles are a big problem in the UK; with over 17 million people living with a musculoskeletal condition, more people suffer with disability from musculoskeletal conditions than anything else.

Good health of bones, joints and muscles underpins living life well. Musculoskeletal conditions affect nearly everyone at some point in their life. They can cause pain, fatigue, restricted mobility and activities of daily living. They impact people’s lives, their work and even people’s other health conditions. Conditions of the bones, joints and muscles represent a significant cost to the individual, the economy and health and social care.

Acknowledging the problem

Everyone knows conditions like arthritis and back pain are common. But they are often misunderstood and ignored, like the figurative elephant in the room. The solution begins in acknowledging the problem. That’s why we need to shift our mindset and start planning and acting nationally, locally and individually for healthy bones, joints and muscles throughout life.

Large rewards

If we’re brave enough to tackle this big and growing problem, to champion lifelong good musculoskeletal health, there are large rewards! We see it day in day out here at goPhysio – poor MSK health has a huge impact on quality of life. If you invest in your MSK health, like in other areas of your health and wellbeing, you can get more out of life!

Why are MSK conditions the elephant in the room?

From our years of experience, there are many factors!

  • Firstly, MSK conditions often occur gradually or creep up on you. It starts as a niggle or minor ache or pain, that you accept as part of life. You manage it yourself or make small adjustments in your life to compensate. Over time, your pain, stiffness and limited mobility gets worse, but the impact on your life has been so gradual, you don’t really notice until the effects are huge. Suddenly you’re not walking so far, aren’t exercising, avoiding certain activities and you take a look and are shocked what affect it’s had on you.
  • MSK conditions aren’t immediately life threatening. Let’s face it, no matter how painful the condition is, there is nothing immediately at stake aside from quality of life. Subsequently, they aren’t always a high priority. However, this view is very short sighted – because over time, the impact of long standing MSK conditions can have a huge impact. Being less active and living with a painful MSK condition can cause many other issues as there will be knock on effects with mental health, cardiovascular health, maintaining a healthy weight and all the complexities that come with health.
  • Culturally, we’ve been lead to believe the ‘wait and see’ approach is OK! How many times have you heard ‘rest’, ‘take painkillers’ ‘it’ll get better in time’? Funding cuts in the NHS has bread this culture! The truth is, if people had the support, education and correct personalised, professional advice from the early onset of an MSK condition, the issues could be reduced massively.
  • Preventing MSK conditions and the solutions aren’t easy! Everyone now wants the easy option, the quick fix! But preventing and addressing MSK conditions need investment in time and effort. If you could take a magic pill that would solve it – great. But tackling these conditions takes time, there often isn’t a miracle miracle cure. e.g. If you have back pain, there is overwhelming evidence that exercise is the best management. But what do most G.P.s do if you go and see them with back pain? They’ll often advise painkillers and rest as the first step. Take osteoarthritis of the knee. Again, exercise is a highly effective treatment for this condition. But shockingly, many people would rather have a risky operation with no guarantee of a positive outcome than commit time and effort to doing regular, prescribed, specific exercises that would help them.

This week is officially Bone and Joint Week. Hopefully, getting the message out there will help filter out awareness of these conditions, the impact they have on so many people.

World Spine Day

Physio for MSK Conditions

physio for MSK conditions hampshire

#BoneJointWeek


How to live an active lifestyle, doing the things you enjoy free from Back Pain

Posted on 8th October 2018 by

If you’re visiting this page, it’s because you or a loved one is suffering with back pain. Well rest Back Pain Report goPhysioassured, you’re not alone! 

At goPhysio, we understand if you’ve got back pain or stiffness – it’s tempting to think that it’s nothing, that it will go away on it’s own. Yet we moan about it, we tell people about it, we struggle to walk upright, we can’t sleep, it stops us doing doing the things we enjoy like golf, gardening or walking – but for some reason we just put up with it. Often hoping it will miraculously disappear by the morning.

If that’s happening to you, you’re not alone. We hear this type of thing all the time. In fact, lower back pain and sciatica is THE most common problem we solve at our Physiotherapy Clinic in Chandlers Ford; getting people just like you back to the activities you enjoy, pain and injury free.

5 Reason’s Why Your Back Pain Could Be Lasting Longer Than You Expect

  1. You’re confused about what do. You’re unsure of what to do or who to see about your back pain? That’s quite common in the early stages, as you’re getting conflicting advice from your friends, family and possibly your GP. 
  2. You’re hoping it will get better itself. This is often wishful thinking, fingers crossed you’ll wake up fre of pain in the morning! (Sound familiar?). Unfortunately, this is rarely the case. If your back pain has lasted for any longer than a few weeks or has recurred a few times, it’s an indication that you need some help to get to the bottom of it.
  3. You’ve been ‘resting’ for too long. Resting too much and for too long is detrimental to recovery. When you rest, your muscles will get tighter and weaker and your joints will get stiffer. This will be most noticeable to you when you try to return to the activities you enjoy. You get ‘straight back to normal’ after a period of rest, and more often than not, this is when your back pain returns and the cycle continues. 
  4. You’re doing generic exercises from ‘Dr Google’ The internet is a great source of free information. However, it’s obvioulsy very generalised. The exercises you may try are not specific for your back problem or for your personal lifestyle. In the real world, this isn’t the most effective way to quickly ease your back pain and get back to doing the hobbies and activities you enjoy!
  5. You’re tackling the symptoms but not the cause. Doing this is like using a sticky plaster. Seeking ways to just relieve your pain or tightness in the short term, like having a massage, hoping it would fix your long term, recurent problem, isn’t the solution. You need to get right to the bottom of the issue and do something about it. There are often a number of issues that have combined to cause your back pain. If they’re not addressed you risk entering that lifelong cycle of pain.

So, if any of that sounds familiar, it’s not a bad thing, in some ways it’s a good thing……… 

Firstly, it tells us what doesn’t work, so we don’t have to waste anymore time. Secondly, it tells us how much closer you are to finding a solution to your back pain and making a decision about permanently fixing it!

At goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, we help you recover from back pain and get back to the activities you enjoy, pain and injury free

What You Can Do To Start Your Recovery From Back Pain Now 

  1. Make a decision to get help. Hopefully, with this information and your free back pain guide, you’re beginning to understand more about your back pain and are closer to making the right decision and returning to the activities you enjoy. Just consider other situations when you’re not confused with your decision about what you need to do………
    1. When your hair is too long, you go to the hairdresser’s and get it cut.
    2. When you have toothache, you’d see the dentist.
    3. When your cat’s ill, you’d call the vet.
    4. If your car broke down, you’d visit the garage…………..So, when you have back pain, you should see a back pain expert to guide you quickly out of pain and disability, returning to the activities you enjoy!
  2. Actually get the right help. Once you’ve decided to get help, don’t delay! Avoid putting up any unnecessary barrier’s to your recovery! Seek out a back pain expert and get some real, expert advice, specific to your injury. You need them to devise a treatment plan aimed at getting back to the activities you enjoy! This may include some ‘hands on’ treatment to help relieve your pain and other symptoms initially, so that you can get mobile and active again in comfort, quickly. Physiotherapists are the first choice for professional sportsman and women the world over, we can also be the best first choice for you!
  3. Do the right exercises’s. Long term, most exercise is great for helping relieve and prevent recurrent back pain. But in the short term, in the early stages, it’s crucial to do the correct exercises, specific to your back pain injury. Being under professional guidance will ensure you receive the right treatment at the right time, speeding your recovery and quickly returning you to the activities you enjoy!
  4. Avoid rest and inactivity. Total rest is never a good idea, it will only delay your recovery, prolonging your injury. Instead, at goPhysio we use the term ‘selective rest’, which means to rest only from the aggravating (pain causing) activities. This is a crucial first step to a speedy recovery! So make sure you’re getting up and moving about as much as you can.

How Deciding To See Us At goPhysio Can Help You 

How can choosing to see a Physiotherapist at goPhysio help you get rid of your back pain in the next few days?

Here’s just a few of the things we can do for you to ease your back pain in the next few days………

  1. Hassle free access to expert Physiotherapists No waiting list’s, convenient early and late appointments, free parking, no referral needed from your GP – you can book by just giving us a call. 
  2. Same day appointments We’ll offer you an appointment within 24hrs of you getting in touch, often on the same day. Once you’ve made the decision to see us, we’ll ensure there are no barrier’s to your recovery.
  3. We can quickly ease your pain and stiffness We can help you find out what’s really going on, and get to the root cause of your back pain once and for all. We know that you want to have some relief from your pain, so will use a range of techniques to make sure we help with this.
  4. We’ll help you get a good nights sleep Trouble sleepin often goes hand in hand with back pain. If you’re having trouble sleeping, we’ll teach you how to position yourself comfortably in bed, to help you sleep much better.
  5. We’ll teach you how to help yourself. It’s all well and good use helping you during your appointments, but its crucial that you are doing everytjing you can do to help yourself the rest of the time. We’ll teach you the best postures, position’s and exercises to ease your pain and stiffness in-between sessions.
  6. Get to the root of YOUR problem We make sure we spend time finding out exactly what’s causing your back pain. We lsiten to your story, what you love to do (and want to get back to). You’ll leave your first session with a bespoke, written personal recovery plan, outlining your treatment program and expected timescales, helping to reassure you with the right information, that’s relevent to you.
  7. We’ll show you how to keep active We’ll make sure from your first to last visit, you clearly understand what you should and shouldn’t be doing, returning you back to more and more activities as you improve, ensuring you stay as active and mobile possible throughout your recovery to the activities you enjoy.
  8. We’re totally focused on you Our care is focused on solving the injury problems and concerns of importance to you, ensuring you achieve your goals, returning to the activities you enjoy!

How Pilates at goPhysio has helped me, by Jill G

Next Steps

Hopefully we’ve answerd some of your questions and concerns and addressed the worries you may be having about your back pain. 

If you have read the information above and think that seeing a Physiotherapist is the best step to take to help you recover from your back pain and our team at goPhysio are the ones to help you, you can book an appointment. 

If you want to know more, you can request a FREE special injury report here.

There are a few options if you’d like to book an appointment:

  1. Call our friendly, helpful Patient Services Team on 023 8025 3317 (we’re open from 8am – 8pm Mon – Thurs, 8am – 6pm Friday & 8am – 12pm Saturday) 
  2. Book an appointment safely and securely online here 24/7
  3. Pop in to see us if you’re in the Chandlers Ford area
  4. Drop us an email or chat to us via our ‘Live Chat’ facility online

If you’re still not sure whether we can help, we’re more than happy to arrange a free telephone consultation. Just drop us an email to fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk to request this and we’ll be in touch. 

Don’t forget to request the free special injury report 8 quick, easy ways to live a healthy, active, positive life, free from back pain here, for more advice and information about back pain. Request my free special injury report.


 


BackCare Awareness Week 2018 – Back Pain in Older Adults

Posted on 6th October 2018 by

This week is the annual Back Care Awareness week, a week brought to us by the BackCare Back Pain older peopleorganisation to highlight and open discussions on back pain.

This year, the theme is back pain in older adults.

Back pain is one of the major disabling health conditions among older adults aged 60 years and older. Many causes of lower back pain are age-related with physical and psychosocial changes. There is a distinct lack of awareness, especially in older adults to the causes and effects of back pain and pain management.

Existing evidence suggests that prevalence rates of severe and chronic low back pain increase with older age. As compared to working-age adults, older adults are more likely to develop lower back pain like osteoporotic vertebral fractures, tumors, spinal infection, and lumbar spinal stenosis.                                                                                       NCBI (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

There are many pro-active ways to both help prevent you developing back pain or tackling back pain if you do start to experience it. Here are 3 of our top tips to help you be back care aware!

  1. Live actively – leading an active life is one of the key ways to help make sure you minimise your risk of developing back pain. If you do develop back pain, keeping moving and active will help give you the best chance of a speedy recovery.
  2. Don’t be afraid of using your back – despite all the messages you may hear “Don’t bend like that, you’ll hurt your back!”, “Be careful of your back!”, “Don’t life that, it’s too heavy and dangerous for your back!” – your back is an extremely strong part of your body, designed to move and support you.
  3. Pain doesn’t always mean harm – it can be very scary experiencing back pain, but the pain you feel doesn’t always mean that you are doing harm or that there is anything serious going on. A serious underlying condition causing pain in your back is very rare. Obviously, if you are worried, seek professional advice to put your mind at ease. But back pain is often nothing to worry about and can be overcome quickly and effectively by doing the right things.

Back care Awareness Weekl

People who read this page also found the following articles useful:

Live well for longer – focus on back pain 

Low back pain and sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Back pain myth 1 – Moving will make my back pain worse

Back pain myth 2 – I should avoid exercising, especially weight training

Back pain myth 3 – A scan will tell me exactly what’s wrong

Help, I’ve got back pain! What should I do?

10 things you should know about your back


 

 

 

 


Live Well For Longer – Focus on Back Pain

Posted on 2nd August 2018 by

Channel 4’s Live Well For Longer programme on Channel 4 this week looked at one of the most common injuries we see and British people experience – Back Pain. Live well for longer back pain

Back pain is thought to cause 30 million days of sick leave a year, costing our economy an estimated £40 billion. It is thought that up to 80% of us will suffer with back pain at some point in our lives.

The programme compared 3 ‘non-medical’ ways to manage long standing back pain; yoga, physiotherapy and osteopathy. They used a well known, standardised tool to measure levels of pain before and after 2 months of each of the interventions in groups of people who had been suffering with back pain for over a year.

In the Physiotherapy group, the physiotherapist helped to facilitate the return of normal movement and worked on strengthening the spine. It was great to see that the ethos of the physiotherapist is teaching people and giving people information and knowledge that they need to help themselves. This is absolutely fundamental in successful treatment of painful conditions such as back pain.

After 2 months, it was found that Yoga and physiotherapy both helped improve people’s pain by 30-50%. Osteopathy reduced pain by a third on average. All 3 groups of people experienced a decrease in their back pain, demonstrating that with time, investment and commitment, there can be huge improvements in pain. The programme obviously only looked at very small sample sizes, but what it demonstrated that there is a positive way to tackle back pain.

The ket message to take away for people with long term back pain, is that you can’t expect short term fixes. People looking for help with back pain need to be realistic – if you’ve had back pain for a long time, there isn’t a quick and easy fix (that so many people seek!). As the Physiotherapist said, retraining muscles can take at least 6 weeks. It’s the dedication, positive attitude and consistency in investing in your body and finding something that works for you that will often be the success!

Read More

Low Back Pain & Sciatica, the latest NICE Guidelines

Help, I’ve got back pain. What should I do?

Back pain Myths: Moving will make my back pain worse, I should avoid exercise if I have back pain, I need a scan to tell me what’s going on


 


On Your Feet Britain 2018

Posted on 7th March 2018 by

UK businesses are failing health needs of their office-based staff – Workers appeal to bosses to take action that will help them lead healthier working lives.

The vast majority of office-based workers are aware of the health dangers of spending hours on end seated at their desks, but management is failing to respond to their needs, according to a survey to mark On Your Feet Britain day on Friday April 28.

Less than a third of line managers were reportedly either aware of the health risks of sedentary behaviour at work but not bothered, or were simply unaware of the issue.

In contrast, close to 90% of employees believed they ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ should be more active at the workplace, while only 5% thought they had no need to increase activity during their working hours.

On Your Feet Britain, now in its third year, is a free event run by the Get Britain Standing campaign in association with Active Working, a community interest company. More than 2,500 businesses have signed up to On Your Feet Britain, encouraging millions of staff members to participate in a variety of fun and simple activities in their workplace to allow them to #sitless and #movemore.

Growing scientific evidence indicates that sitting for more than four hours each day (however active a person you are outside the workplace) leads to multiple health risks (including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and mental health problems).

More than three-quarters of respondents to the survey, of 250 business organisations across the UK, wanted to see clear leadership, encouragement and better education on active working solutions, 38% believed a complete culture change was necessary, and 34% wanted access to adjustable desks.

Only 28% of companies were said to be ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged sitting, an encouraging 36% were ‘somewhat aware but keen to know more’, almost 22% were ‘somewhat aware but not that bothered’ and 13% were totally ignorant on the matter.

Almost 60% of co-workers questioned said they spend six or more hours a day seated during a typical office day and almost 90% spend upwards of five hours a day sitting down.

This despite more than 75% of office workers who replied to the survey confirming that they were ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged or excessive sitting. A further 20% said they were ‘somewhat aware’ of the dangers of the ‘sitting disease’ but wanted to know more. Fewer than 5% were either unaware or simply not that bothered.

Almost a third of line managers were reportedly either aware of the health risks of sedentary behaviour but not bothered or were simply unaware of the issue. Only 28% of companies were said to be ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged sitting, an encouraging 36% were ‘somewhat aware but keen to know more’, almost 22% were ‘somewhat aware but not that bothered’ and 13% were totally ignorant on the matter.

In contrast, close to 90% of employees believed they ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ should be more active at the workplace, while only 5% thought they had no need to increase activity during their working hours.

The average UK office worker sits 10 hours each day, with almost 70% of sitting taking place at work and 73 % only leaving their desk for toilet or tea breaks. Studies indicate that ongoing inactive behaviour is a risk for ALL employees, however fit and active they are outside the workplace.

Employees across the country need to start asking for more activity in the workplace. No employee should be expected to sit for excessive or prolonged periods, like battery hens” says Gavin Bradley, Founding Director of Active Working. “On Your Feet Day is the perfect way to start experiencing the wellness and productivity benefits of sitting less and moving more. We are thrilled to see so many companies getting involved and engaged. We are all becoming increasingly aware of the importance of breaking up and reducing sitting time.

On Your Feet Britain is a day when workers are encouraged to give their health a boost, converting sitting time to standing time by taking some simple actions. For example:

  • Stand during phone calls
  • Stand and take a break from your computer every 30 minutes
  • Use the stairs rather than the lift
  • Have standing or walking meetings
  • Eat your lunch away from your desk
  • Walk to your colleague’s desk instead of phoning or emailing them
  • Stand at the back of the room during presentations

If you’d like to get involved in On Your Feet Britain on 28th April, register here!

 


Back Care Awareness Week – Back Pain in Education

Posted on 2nd October 2017 by

The annual Back Care Awareness Week, run by BackCare, the UK’s leading charity for those impacted by back or neck pain, is to take place between 2 and 6 October. The theme this year is Back Pain in Education.

Back pain is one of the top common causes of absence from work throughout the country. It costs the UK economy around £15 billion every year as over four million working days are lost as a result of the condition. Furthermore, about 80% of the UK population will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives.

BackCare decided it was important to run a campaign targeted at children and young people as many of the back and neck pain problems experienced by adults are due to them not looking after their backs during childhood and teenage years.

Back pain
The image here, that BackPain have promoted has the message ‘Don’t pick up heavy things’. There’s nothing wrong with picking up something heavy! In all our years as Physiotherapists, I don’t recall we’ve ever seen a young patient who’s injured their back by picking up something too heavy!

Dr Brian Hammond, the Chair of BackCare said: “Early teaching of children and young people of the importance of taking care of their backs is bound to have a positive effect on the health of their backs as adults.”

He added: “There are simple things children and young people can do, such as sitting properly and not for too long, exercising regularly, stretching and lifting correctly. They also need to know how to carry their school books and equipment in a way that does not harm their back or neck.”

Why we somewhat disagree with this years message!

However, leading Physiotherapists and the latest research will tend to disagree with some of the points raised in this campaign. Although we agree that education and empowering people with understanding and knowledge of taking care of their bodies from a young age is crucial, implying that they can damage their spines by doing normal, everyday tasks like carrying a school bag, is a myth. These messages can lead to an unnecessary fear, which can then progress into adulthood.

Research is suggesting that there isn’t a ‘perfect posture’ or ‘best way to carry a bag’. So implying that young children can ‘harm’ their back or neck in these ways isn’t a positive message to put across.

This image sums up perfectly how children should be caring for their backs – not focusing on correct postures or harmful habits – moving regularly!

Kids perfect posture

So what messages should we be sharing?

  • Exercise and movement is the key – youngsters should be encouraged and supported to take part in a wide variety of exercise, sport and activities that encourage regular, whole body movement that they enjoy! It doesn’t really matter what it is, but enjoyment and instilling a lifelong, love of being active is the best way to prevent developing any back problems.
  • Move regularly – our bodies aren’t designed to be still. It’s not the posture that’s the problem, but staying in single positions for too long that can lead to issues. So, when you read about issues such as ‘text neck’, it tends to be the duration that people are using their devices in, in a single, sustained position that can cause issues. If you held a so called ‘perfect posture’ for any sustained length of time, this could cause issues!
  • Don’t be afraid of pain – aches and pains can be a normal everyday occurrence. We can all feel a bit of stiffness, aching, muscle soreness etc. But pain doesn’t always equal damage. Particularly with back pain, being afraid of the pain tends to lead to us being overly protective, not moving as much, which in turn can cause more pain. It’s a vicious circle. As long as there are no indications to be concerned that something more serious is going on to cause the pain (trauma, pins & needles or numbness, problems going to the toilet, pain at night for example – if any of these are present, it’s advised to see your GP ASAP), then we need to install the confidence that the pain is OK.
  • Be careful with the language we use – particularly with children, the words we use if they’re in pain can be very influential. Negative words like harm, damage, out of place, torn, can all create very negative messages. We need to focus on positive messages like strong and active. Being overly focused on carrying things correctly at a young age, will install a fear that their backs aren’t designed to cope with such a normal, everyday, task – which ins’t true.

There are obviously times and instances when children do develop back or neck pain. This can be caused by sustained postures (often technology related) and a lack of exercise of general movement. In these cases, specific education and increasing their awareness is a key part of helping them overcome any pain they are experiencing. Postural education may be a part of this.

It’s great that BackCare are are raising awareness of back issues in this campaign, but let’s keep the messages positive and not install a fear into young people that their backs might not be fit for the job!

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Healthy Holiday Guide

Posted on 21st July 2017 by

With schools winding down and the sun well & truly out, it’s time for many to pack their cases for that summer holiday!

You’d be surprised how many last minute panic calls we get from people desperate to see a physio before their holiday to have some help with their injury. So if you are carrying an injury and want to go away injury free so you can fully enjoy your holiday, get in touch now. Recovery can take time and you don’t want to be one of those people who say “I’ve had this months, I should have come sooner.” Which we hear all too often.

Holidays should be a time to relax and unwind. But the stress of packing and travelling can put holidaymakers at risk of picking up strains and sprains before they even hit the beach!

Holidays are about unwinding from all the stresses and strains of everyday life and undoing the sometimes harm we do to ourselves through the rest of the year,” goPhysio’s Clinical Director Paul says.

But “having to contend with masses to organise and a lengthy journey can often lead to awkward postures and doing things our bodies aren’t used to doing, which might cause or aggravate physical problems. Common holiday-related problems include back and neck injuries, as well as shoulder and wrist strains.

We forget we’re doing something out of the ordinary and that could include sitting for hours in cramped seats, queuing and lifting heavy bags. All that combined with high stress levels could mean putting our bodies under physical stresses we’re not accustomed to.”

Even the most simple holiday pleasures can create discomfort. For example, just going for a walk along the beach with bare feet or in the wrong footwear can lead to inflammation and pain in your knees, calves or feet, through over-stretched tendons and ligaments,” Paul says.

There are simple ways to avoid injury when doing activities that are not part of your usual every day routine.

Here’s some simple tips to avoid holiday injuries this year.

Packing a bag: Place your bag on a higher surface such as a bed, to avoid repeatedly bending over to pack. Break up your packing over a few weeks or days, so you’re spreading the preparation out and not rushing to do it quickly at the last minute, doing many repeated movements in a short space of time, which the body often doesn’t like.

Managing luggage: If you’re not used to lifting heavy items or your case is large or awkward, lift it with care. You can find yourself lifting a case many times on a journey (in/out of car boot, on/off luggage trolley, on/off check in and carousel etc.) which can take its’ toll. People often think of back problems associated with lifting, but we also see many people with wrist or shoulder injuries from travelling, having carted luggage and bags around. Minimise the amount of lifting you do as much as possible, choosing a case with wheels and not overpacking! If you’re travelling as part of a family, spread the load so you have more cases, with less weight in each. Try and choose light weight cases too, to lessen the burden. If you are lifting, use your powerful leg muscles to take much of the weight and keep the weight of the case close to your body – this just helps to minimise too much stress.

Standing in queues: There can be a lot of queuing when travelling. Use this opportunity to do some exercises! When standing and waiting, practise good posture. Stand up straight, with your tummy muscles pulled in and shoulders back and down. If you are standing for a very long time, stand as tall as possible and transfer weight from one leg to another to boost your circulation. Try some heel raises – going up and down on your tip toes, or mini squats. Circling your shoulders forwards and back and doing some neck stretches to ease any built up tension, can be good too.

Travelling: As well as standing in queues, you can spend a lot of time sitting down when traveling. When seated, try to sit with your buttocks pushed to the back of the seat. Make sure your lower back is well supported and you are not slumped. You can always take a small towel or lumbar roll with you if you like to have back support. If you are driving, ensure your position is as supported as possible and move the seat to make yourself comfortable. If you’re taking on a very long drive, read our guide to ‘Steering Clear of pain’ when driving. Whenever possible, break up your journey or get out of your seat and have a good walk around.

Holiday activities: Holiday’s can often be a chance to try out a new activity – whether it’s beach volleyball, extra long hikes, mountain climbing or surfing! If you’re trying something physical that’s out of the ordinary for you, start off gradually. Don’t go straight in 100% – especially if you’ve spent the last 6 months sat at a desk and the last 10 hours travelling! Having time to spend being more active is fantastic, but you don’t want to overdo it and pickup injury to spoil your holiday. Listen to your body and warm up for your activity suitably. Pace yourself and make sure you get time to rest in between too!

Most of all, whatever you have planned for this summer, enjoy yourself! If you can make some time for you and some rest and relaxation, away from the fast paced life so many of us now live.

If you do want to have an injury or niggle checked out before you go away, so you can really make the most of your time off – book in to see one of our Physio’s. Or maybe have a deep tissue sports massage before you go, so you start your holiday relaxed and tension free!

If you do pick up a holiday injury, you can book in to get sorted as soon as you return by using our easy and secure online booking system, available to you anywhere in the world 24/7 to book physiotherapy and massage appointments.

Happy Holidays!


New exercise class for back pain sufferers in Chandlers Ford

Posted on 17th May 2017 by

Back pain affects nearly everyone at some point in their life. After stress, back pain is the second most common reason for taking time off of work, with some 4 million working days lost through back pain every year. Unfortunately for some people, back pain can become a recurrent & persistent part of their life.

There isn’t always an obvious cause of back pain, and many factors such as poor posture, working conditions, driving and lifting can all contribute.

Research has shown though that staying physically active is the key to helping back pain. Recent guidelines from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommend that regular physical activity & exercise in combination with education can help people manage their low back pain.

It is based on these guidelines that here at goPhysio, we have developed a new educational & exercise course called Active Backs.

Paul Baker, goPhysio’s Clinical Director, says

“So many people we see are afraid to move when they have back pain. They are scared they are going to cause more damage. As long as anything serious has been ruled out, movement is the key to helping improve your back pain in the long term.”

“All the research agrees that by being educated how to manage your back pain and learning how to exercise correctly, you will be able to gain confidence in using your back correctly. This will help you not only reduce your pain but also prevent it coming back again.”

The programme is thought to be the first one of it’s kind in the area. Classes are run every Tuesday from 11.15am – 12.15pm.

Active Backs will include both an educational element, covering weekly topics such as posture, coping strategies and relaxation. It will also include a weekly exercise circuit to help strengthen and stretch your muscles and improve your fitness. Through coming to Active Backs we aim to help you achieve your goals.

The course will be run by one of our dedicated Clinicians and numbers are limited to six, to ensure that everyone receive the individual attention they require. It is going to be held in our new ‘Strong Room’. fully equipped with resistance training, weights, balls and mats, and equipment designed to help you get the most from exercising for your spine.

For details on how to book, please take a look here. All bookings are easily managed online and you can have maximum flexibility with bookings and even combine with some yoga classes.

Read More 

Latest NICE guideline for back pain & sciatica

10 things you need to know about your back

Help I’ve got back pain, what should I do?


 


10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back

Posted on 4th May 2017 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) have put together a great campaign, ’10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back’.

Back pain research constantly gives new insights into previously held beliefs. Their guide reflects these advances to give clear, simple advice on how to manage your pain and prevent future episodes.

Here’s the latest advice from the CSP:

  1. Your back is stronger than you may think Most people worldwide will experience back pain during their lifetime. It can be disabling and worrying but it is very common and rarely dangerous. The spine is a strong, stable structure and not easily damaged so in most instances it is a simple sprain or strain. In these cases – 98 per cent, according to research – people recover reasonably quickly, and many do so without treatment. Some people experience repeat episodes, which can be distressing, but again these are rarely dangerous.
  2. You rarely need a scan and it can do more harm than good
    This is because seeing perfectly normal changes to their spine can cause people to avoid the activities they should be doing to get better, such as exercise and movement in general. In very rare cases, there may be something more serious or underlying that requires medical advice. A scan may help with your diagnosis and symptoms to be aware of are at the bottom of this page. However, these account for just two per cent of cases so if your physio or GP does not send you for one, you should take it as a good sign that there is nothing concerning going on.
  3. Avoid bed rest, stay in work and gradually resume normal activities
    Scientific studies now indicate prolonged rest and avoidance of activity for people with low back pain actually leads to higher levels of pain, greater disability, poorer recovery and longer absence from work. In the first few days of a new episode of low back pain, avoiding aggravating activities may help to relive pain. However, staying as active as possible and returning to all usual activities gradually is actually important in aiding recovery – this includes staying in work where possible. While it is normal to move differently and more slowly in the first few days of having back pain, this altered movement can be unhealthy if continued in the long-term.
  4. You should not fear bending or lifting
    Bending and lifting are often portrayed as causes of back pain and while an injury can occur if something is picked up in an awkward or unaccustomed way, it’s most likely to just be a sprain or strain. The important thing is to practice and get your body used to carrying different loads and weights in a way we find comfortable and efficient. We all run differently, and it’s perfectly normal for us to find our own technique for lifting.
  5. Exercise and activity reduce and prevent back pain
    Exercise is shown to be very helpful for tackling back pain and is also the most effective strategy to prevent future episodes. Start slowly and build up both the amount and intensity of what you do and don’t worry if it’s sore to begin with – you won’t be damaging your back. No one type of exercise is proven to be more effective than others so just pick an exercise you enjoy, that you can afford to maintain in the long-term and that fits in with your daily schedule.
  6. Painkillers will not speed up your recovery
    There is no strong evidence on the benefits of painkillers and they do not speed up recovery. They should only be used in conjunction with other measures, such as exercise, and even then just as a short-term option as they can bring side effects. Exercise, which is safer and cheaper, is considered the preferred option.
  7. Surgery is rarely needed
    There are some uncommon back conditions where there is pressure on the nerves that supply the legs and the patient gets leg symptoms, such as pain, pins and needles or numbness. For these conditions, surgery can help the leg symptoms but it is important to understand that it is not always required. You also need to know that on average, the results for back surgery are no better in the medium and long term than non-surgical interventions, such as exercise. So a non-surgical option, which includes exercise and activity, should always come first.
  8. Get good quality sleep
    The importance of sleep in tackling back pain has become increasingly clear in recent years. This is because it reduces stress and improves your overall feeling of wellbeing, making you less susceptible to the triggers of pain in the first instance and helping you to cope when it does occur. Aim for 7.5-8 hours a night and try to aim for a regular routine, as far as possible. It is also very important to know that there is no best position or type of mattress – whatever feels most comfortable for you is best.
  9. You can have back pain without any damage or injury
    Many physical or psychological factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. Many factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. They could be– Physical factors, such as ‘protecting’ the back and avoiding movements, or a simple strain.
    – Psychological factors, including a fear of damage or not getting better, feeling down or being stressed.
    – More general health and lifestyle factors, like being tired and rundown, not getting enough good quality sleep, being overweight or not getting enough physical activity
    – Social triggers, such as difficult relationships at work or home, low job satisfaction or stressful life events, like a family death or illness. Crucially, it’s important to know that all pain is 100 per cent real and never ‘all in your head’, even when factors like stress or mood are involved. Each of the factors can turn up the volume on your pain and gaining a greater understanding of when that can happen puts you in a stronger position to recognise them and learn how to turn down the dial again.
  10. If it doesn’t clear up, seek help but don’t worry Physiotherapists provide expert advice, guidance and treatment for back pain. This is to help reduce your chances of future episodes, while improving your overall health and well-being.

At goPhysio, we offer a range of services to help you manage your back pain. 

Physiotherapy – If you want reassurance and help to become more confident with your back, physiotherapy can help. We can provide expert guidance and treatment for your back pain, tailored to you and your lifestyle. You can book an appointment online or give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

Clinical Pilates – Our specialist Pilates classes are a great way to keep you strong and active. They focus on building strength and flexibility and being able to move well. The classes are small and you will be under the close supervision of one of our Therapists at all times. We run 17 classes a week, including evenings and weekends, at a variety of levels, so it’s easy to find a class to suit you. Have a look at our latest timetable.

Rehabilitation – Our rehabilitation service puts into practice the latest, evidence based management for conditions such as back pain. Using a huge range of exercises and equipment, all under the guidance and support of our Clinicians, you will have a tailor made programme put together to help you get strong and physically resilient! It’s a bit like Clinical Personal Training! The great thing is, that it’s personal to you and your condition but you can be confident you are doing the right exercises, in a fun and welcoming environment. Find out more here.

Symptoms to be aware of:

These symptoms are very rare but you should contact a doctor if you experience any of them:

  • Difficulty passing urine or having the sensation to pass water that is not there
  • Numbness/tingling in your genitals or buttocks area
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control
  • Impaired sexual function, such as loss of sensation during intercourse
  • Loss of power in your legs
  • Feeling unwell with your back pain, such as a fever or significant sweating that wakes you from sleep

Read More:

Low back pain and sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Help, I’ve got back pain! What should I do?

Back Pain Myths


 

 


Avoid Bank Holiday Gardening Pains

Posted on 10th April 2017 by

With the 4 day Easter weekend upon us and coinciding with National Gardening Week, it’s that time of year to get out in that garden, tackle those Avoid gardening painweeds and start to prepare for the nicer weather – whether it’s out of choice or because someone has nagged you to do it!

Here are our top tips to avoid injury, whether you’re gardening, painting the shed or washing the patio!

Warm up before starting

You wouldn’t go for a run or start a gym workout without warming up your body – so make sure you do the same before you start work. Go for a brisk walk around the garden, get the blood circulating round your body & do a few gentle stretches to loosen your muscles before you start that weeding!

Cool down when you finish

Same as tip number one – make sure you wind down to a stop and do some more gentle stretches when you finish to stop your muscles stiffening up after your activity. Don’t just sit down and admire your hard work (as tempting as it might be!).

Pace yourself!

With a 4 day weekend, it’s tempting to do all the work in one day to keep the rest of your time free – but this could lead to overworked and over strained muscles and joints. Spread your jobs out evenly over the weekend and build up to the harder jobs.

Variety is key

Try to avoid spending time in prolonged positions – by varying your tasks, you will limit the strain you put on each body part. For example, do 30 minutes of weeding, 30 minutes of digging and then 30 minutes of mowing the lawn. Put some mini breaks in between each job to have a rest, stretch and drink.

Avoid twisting

Keep your feet facing the same way as your hips and shoulders – this stops any rotational strain through your body. Stand straight as you mow the lawn or push a wheelbarrow and keep everything you need close by to avoid twisting to reach it.

Keep everything at the correct height

If you are working at a bench, make sure you don’t have to crouch or stretch to reach it – this could put extra strain on your back. If you’re working at a height, use a ladder or step to stop straining your neck by looking up for long periods.

Lift with your knees, not your back

When lifting heavy objects, make sure to bend your hips and knees to help support your back. Holding the object closer to your body will also help reduce any extra strain – so make sure to wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty!

If you do injur yourself – don’t panic! Have a look back at our previous blogs on using heat vs ice and the ‘POLICE’ method of self treatment. If in doubt, give our friendly Patient Care Team a call and book an appointment with one of Physiotherapists at goPhysio. We’ll be able to assess, diagnose and treat any injury and give you the best advice on how to treat and prevent another episode!

You can also book an appointment online over the bank holiday.