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Why is acupuncture like winding spaghetti round a fork or going fishing?

Posted on 3rd Oct 2018 by

At goPhysio our team of Clinicians are trained to use a variety of acupuncture techniques, from Dry Needling (which focuses on the myofascial trigger points), through to Traditional Chinese Acupuncture. 

The different methods of acupuncture can all be used to assist in the treatment of a variety of injuries from knee pain through to headaches, helping speed up the return to active rehabilitation as well as improving general health and wellbeing.

Traditional Chinese Acupuncture

Traditional Chinese Acupuncture is based around specific acupuncture points, of which there are over 2000 in the body (361 commonly used points identified by the World Health Organisation in 1991).  These points are connected by pathways called meridians.  These pathways conduct energy, known as Qi, through the body and its internal organs. Acupuncture at goPhysio

When we experience pain, one theory is that it is due to a disruption in the flow of this energy.  When acupuncture is administered using this method the therapist is aiming to elicit a sensation known as De-qi in order to harmonise the flow of Qi (energy).  De-qi is the sensation that is felt by the person receiving the acupuncture and is a sign to the acupuncturist that indicates the curative effect has been initiated.  De-qi can be described in numerous ways ranging from a sensation of heaviness, warmth, cold or aching through to tingling or numbness.  

As well as a physical sensation felt by the person receiving the acupuncture De-qi is also a biomechanical phenomenon known as needle grasp.  In needle grasp the therapist feels resistance to further needle manipulation/stimulation which has been described as a fish biting on a line (Song to Elucidate Mysteries, Biao You Fu).

Dry Needling, or Myofascial Needling

Dry Needling, or Myofascial Needling, is based around placing the acupuncture needles in areas of tightness/restriction or muscular trigger points.  Several theories as to how this method of needling works include the stimulation of the nervous system, relaxation of trigger points (tight knots) and the stimulation of the body to produce substances called endorphins and natural opiods which reduce pain. Acupuncture Treatment Chandlers Ford

As with Traditional Chinese Acupuncture, the therapist will manipulate the needle, most commonly by rotating it.  This fundementally leads to the winding of the tissues around the needle like winding spaghetti round a fork (at a microscopic level!).  

The needle grasp (fish biting on a line) that is felt in Chinese acupuncture is the same as the winding of tissues (spaghetti around the fork) that is elicited in dry needling/myofascial needling.

Consequently the two approaches to acupuncture have many overlaps both from a patient experience as well as the therapist application.

When would acupuncture benefit me?

Our Clinicians may suggest acupuncture to you as a treatment technique, if they think it would help ease your pain or symptoms. It is generally a treatment used as part of a holistic recovery plan, a good way to help ease your pain so you can get more active and move easier, which in turn will boost your recovery. It is often combined with an exercise programme, education and advice and other physio treatments that will help your recovery.

People who’ve read this page have also read Acupuncture helped ease my neck pain, Acupuncture Awareness Week, Acupuncture Myths.


Migraine Awareness Week

Posted on 1st Sep 2018 by

Migraine Awareness Week 2018

Each September, The Migraine Trust dedicate a week to raise general awareness of migraine as a serious public health issue and to reduce stigma.

Migraine is the third most common disease in the world, with an estimated global prevalence of one in seven people. Despite being recognised as one of the most disabling lifetime conditions, awareness and understanding is low.

This year, Migraine Awareness Week is focusing on the impact of migraine in the workplace. 

Being mindful of migraines means that employers should try:

  • to be aware of the high numbers of people who get migraine, that it is very common and that there is a strong possibility that someone they employ might get migraine.
  • to have an understanding that it is a complex neurological condition and that people can experience migraine very differently.
  • to make reasonable adjustments once they become aware that they have an employee who gets migraine, such as considering flexible working practices and looking at how their physical environment can be adjusted to help prevent the triggering of a migraine.

Workplaces being mindful of migraine won’t mean that people with migraine never struggle at work again or that they won’t encounter issues at work because of migraine, but we believe it is an important step in helping people work with migraine.

How Physiotherapy can help people with migraine

Headaches and migraines can have many different causes. You can read more about some of the common types on a previous blog.

Physiotherapy techniques can be very effective at successfully relieving and preventing headaches and migraines. One such technique we use at goPhysio is acupuncture.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Acupuncture works as preventative method for treating headaches and migraines – it works to resolve the cause of the issue by addressing imbalances and then continues to maintain that equilibrium to prevent any further re-occurrence of migraines.

Migraines often have a systemic cause involving reduced or compromised blood supply to the brain – TCM Acupuncture aims to improve the blood supply and circulation to help reduce the symptoms of a migraine.

It can also help with the following:

  • Pain relief – by stimulating nerves located in the surrounding muscles, neuro-chemicals are released that alter how the brain processes pain signals.
  • Reducing inflammation – by promoting the release of vascular and immune system altering factors.
  • Regulating extra- and intra-cranial blood flow.
  • Reducing the degree of cortical spreading depression, which is an electrical wave in the brain common in migraines.
  • Affecting the serotonin levels within the brain, which can halt an acute migraine attack

Read more about the evidence and safety of using acupuncture to treat migraines.

At goPhysio, we will use an integrated approach to help you manage your migraines. We will look at all the factors involved and tend to use acupuncture as a part of your treatment programme, which may also include:

  • Exercises to address muscle strength, flexibility and stability around the neck and back areas if this is contributing to your migraines
  • Education and advice to address any lifestyle factors or habits
  • Addressing any other areas that may be contributing to your problems, commonly neck, thoracic spine or shoulder regions

Read more

Tension headaches

Cervicogenic headaches

The prevalence of headaches

The impact of migraine to the economy

#letsbeatmigraine #migraineawarenessweek

Migraine Awareness Week 2018

Migraine Awareness Week 2018

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Acupuncture Myth #3 I’ll be covered in plasters!

Posted on 9th Mar 2017 by

Acupuncture Myth I’ll be covered in plasters after my acupuncture session

Reality Very rarely do you bleed after having acupuncture – the needles are so fine and your skin is so elastic, the point where the needle has been closes up with no need for a plaster! You probably won’t even see where the needles have been.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Myth #2 “I can’t give blood if I’ve had acupuncture”

Posted on 8th Mar 2017 by

Myth: I can’t give blood if I have acupuncture

Reality: If you have had acupuncture by a qualified healthcare professional registered with a statutory body (such as the AACP), you are safe to give blood. If the acupuncturist is not registered then you can’t give blood for 4 months. You may need to ask your acupuncturist for their registration number to take when you give blood.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Awareness Week Myth 1 ‘Acupuncture is painful’

Posted on 7th Mar 2017 by

This week is acupuncture awareness week and so we’re dispelling some commonly held myths about this treatment technique.

Myth Acupuncture treatment is painful

Reality Acupuncture isn’t always completely pain-free, but it’s not as bad as you might think! Acupuncture is less painful than having blood taken or an injection, as the needles are so fine. You may feel a tiny ‘sting’ as the needle goes in, but many people don’t feel anything. The discomfort you tend to experience with acupuncture while the needles are in place is a deep dull aching, known as ‘De Qi’. According to traditional Chinese practice is the stimulation of energy at that point and is a good sign the needles are doing their job.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Awareness Week – Getting To The Point

Posted on 6th Mar 2017 by

This week is acupuncture awareness week – but what is acupuncture and how does it work?

In this article, we take a look at some common ways acupuncture is used in physiotherapy.

What is acupuncture?

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese therapy which involves inserting very fine needles into the body to help remedy a huge variety of conditions. With a 2,500 year history and a growing body of medical research confirming its effectiveness, acupuncture has now been widely accepted by western healthcare. Although acupuncture is often sought out as a last resort after all ‘normal’ treatments have failed it is fast becoming one of the most popular complementary therapies in the UK with 2.3 million acupuncture treatments carried out each year. Have a look at some of the conditions acupuncture can be beneficial for in these fact sheets. 

What can acupuncture help?

Traditional acupuncture can treat a huge range of conditions from infertility to anxiety. In physiotherapy we commonly use it to treat pain such as back pain, headaches, muscle and Acupuncture Chandlers Fordtendon problems and osteoarthritis of the knee, as these conditions have all been shown to have some evidence that they respond to acupuncture. Because acupuncture is a calming treatment it can also help promote a feeling of general relaxation and well-being, aiding sleep which is useful in many long term pain conditions.

Acupuncture usually works best with combined with other treatments such as exercise or hands on therapy, therefore it’s rarely used as a stand-alone treatment by physiotherapists.

Is acupuncture the right treatment for me?

Your therapist will ask you a series of questions to help determine whether acupuncture is right for you. These include asking about your medical history and of course about any phobia of needles! A few reasons we might not use acupuncture include a history of epilepsy, blood clotting disorders, infection or if you are pregnant. As physiotherapists we have many treatment options for all conditions so if acupuncture is likely to help your condition your physio will recommend it but if you’re not a fan of needles that’s fine too – we have plenty of other options!

How does it work?

There are many different theories – in ancient Chinese medicine they believe that acupuncture helps clear your energy channels (meridians) and restore your natural balance of energy coming in and leaving the body (yin and yang). In western medicine research has shown that acupuncture can help to ‘switch off’ the body’s pain response by giving it an alternative sensation which blocks out the barrage of pain signals to the brain. It also releases chemicals such as endorphins and natural opioids which are both pain-relieving substances as well as improving circulation to the healing area. Acupuncture is known to promote relaxation of tight knots (trigger points) in the muscles and has a general calming effect on the central nervous system by lowering your heart rate and blood pressure.

How long are the sessions and how many will I need?

Acupuncture can be included in your normal physiotherapy treatment session, so depending on what your therapist is treating you for they may leave the needles in for anything from 5 – 30 minutes. Your first session of acupuncture is usually slightly shorter to see how you respond but the length of treatment and number of needles used may be increased as you get used to the sensation. Most people respond to acupuncture in 4-6 sessions, however this is individual and depends on your condition.

Are they any side effects?

Acupuncture is a very safe treatment – the needles used are sterile and single use, surprisingly much narrower than injection needles. The smallest are around 0.13mm wide (about the thickness of a human hair) so most people don’t feel the needles go in. It is common to get a mild tingling, warmth or heavy feeling in the area whilst the needles are in. The most common side effect is mild bruising, however some people can feel a little light-headed or drowsy after treatment.

The risk of serious harm with acupuncture is incredibly low – a study in 2006 reviewed 4 million acupuncture treatments and found only 11 serious adverse events and zero fatalities. This makes it far safer than the majority of household medicines. Looking for an acupuncturist that has trained through an accredited organisation such as the British Acupuncture Council or the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists is the best way to minimise you risk as you can be sure the practitioner has undergone rigorous training.

Is there anything I should I do before/after acupuncture?

Try and eat a couple hours before your treatment, particularly if you have a condition such as diabetes where you could be more at risk of feeling faint if your blood sugar is low.

After treatment make sure you have time to sit and drink a glass of water before rushing off. You may also want to avoid driving after your first appointment in case you feel dizzy or drowsy.

Try not to plan anything strenuous such as vigorous exercise after an acupuncture session and avoid stimulants such as caffeine and alcohol for the rest of the day to enhance the feeling of relaxation from acupuncture.

If you think you could benefit from the combine approach of physiotherapy and acupuncture to help your recovery from a painful condition or injury, then give us a call or book an appointment online.

Read more about how acupuncture helped ease Martin’s neck pain.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek

 


How having acupuncture at goPhysio helped my neck pain & stiffness

Posted on 26th Aug 2016 by

My name is Martin and I’m a local sales manager, who commutes for a living & works a lot on the laptop. During a recent very busy period at work I suddenly developed a really stiff & painful neck. I was commuting hundreds of miles & nothing would ease the pain.

Then through the recommendation of a friend I went to see Paul at goPhysio. Paul used what he called ‘myofascial acupuncture’. This involved targeting the needles at the source of my pain. He also gave me confidence that it was OK to move my neck and some exercises to help get it moving again. Within only a couple of sessions the treatment relieved all my muscle spasm & pain, much to my delight. Without Paul’s treatment I think my neck would have got stiffer and stiffer and the pain would have got worse. He gave me lot’s of advice how to prevent it becoming a problem again too – thinking about my driving and working on my computer especially.

I don’t hesitate to recommend goPhysio now to anyone in pain!


Could acupuncture help you recover from injury?

Posted on 16th Jun 2016 by

All of our Physiotherapists are experienced at using acupuncture as part of their physiotherapy treatment. They have undertaken rigorous post graduate training and education in the safe and effective use of acupuncture. If you think acupuncture may help you, get in touch to find out more.

Acupuncture for pain relief at goPhysio


How having acupuncture at goPhysio helped my neck pain & stiffness

Posted on 28th Feb 2012 by

My name is Martin and I’m a local sales manager, who commutes for a living and works a lot on the laptop. During a recent very busy period at work I suddenly developed a really stiff and painful neck. I was commuting hundreds of miles and nothing would ease the pain.

Then through the recommendation of a friend I went to see Paul at goPhysio. Paul useMyofascial acupuncture Chandlers Fordd what he called ‘myofascial acupuncture’. This involved targeting the needles at the source of my pain. He also gave me confidence that it was OK to move my neck and some exercises to help get it moving again.

Within only a couple of sessions the treatment relieved all my muscle spasm and pain, much to my delight. Without Paul’s treatment I think my neck would have got stiffer and stiffer and the pain would have got worse. He gave me lot’s of advice how to prevent it becoming a problem again too – thinking about my driving and working on my computer especially.

I don’t hesitate to recommend goPhysio now to anyone in pain!

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