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National Fitness Day 2018

Posted on 25th September 2018 by

This year’s National Fitness Day is on Wednesday 26th September and promises to continue to National Fitness Day 2018encourage the nation to celebrate the fun of fitness and physical activity across the UK.

As part of National Fitness Day, UK Active will be running a social media campaign – #Fitness2Me

#Fitness2Me aims to celebrate what fitness means to people, promoting that keeping physically active means something different to us all.

UK Active want to make #Fitness2Me the biggest movement in breaking down the barriers that stop people being active, showing that fitness is for everyone!

They hope that by encouraging people from all walks of life, activity levels, and interests to share what fitness means to them, it will inspire others to live healthier and happier lives through being active.

So if it is getting fit, getting happy, playing with grandkids, or connecting with pets, whatever it means to you we want to hear about it!

  • Simply grab a piece of paper and scribble down what Fitness Means 2 You
  • Then take a photo or capture a 60 second video to share with us on social media
  • Don’t forget to add #Fitness2Me and #FitnessDay and tag us via @FitnessDayUK

A major issue that people face when trying to increase activity levels, is overcoming perceived or actual barriers.

Here are some suggestions for overcoming barriers to physical activity.

Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers
Lack of time Identify available time slots. Monitor your daily activities for one week. Identify at least three 30-minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
Add physical activity to your daily routine. For example, walk or ride your bike to work or shopping, organise school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stairclimbing.
Social influence Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family. Ask them to support your efforts.
Invite friends and family members to exercise with you. Plan social activities involving exercise, like family walks or walk to a coffee shop with a friend.
Develop new friendships with physically active people. Join a group, such as a walking club.
Lack of energy Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel most energetic naturally.
Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level; then, try it.
Lack of motivation Plan ahead. Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it on your calendar.
Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
Join an exercise group or class.
Fear of injury Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health status.
Make sure you get any injuries checked out, so you have confidence to exercise without fear. 
Lack of skill Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs, or jogging.
Take a class to develop new skills.
Lack of resources Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, skipping, or free online classes.
Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community Park Run, Eastleigh Borough Council Activities, Health walks etc. 
Weather conditions Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor cycling, free online classes, indoor swimming,  stair climbing, skipping, dancing, yoga, etc.)
Travel Put a skipping rope in your suitcase and skip.
Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
Join a nationwide gym.
Visit the local shopping centre and walk for half an hour or more.
Bring your mp3 player your favorite aerobic exercise music.
Family obligations Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbour, or family member who also has small children.
Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, do an aerobic dance or exercise video for kids (there are several online) and exercise together. You can spend time together and still get your exercise.
True skipping, ride a stationary bicycle, or use other home gymnasium equipment while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g., during school hours or their nap time).
Retirement years Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less. Spend more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren. Children with short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, line dancing, or swimming.
Now that you have the time, make regular physical activity a part of every day. Go for a walk every morning or every evening before dinner. Treat yourself to an exercycle and ride every day while reading a favorite book or magazine.

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Balance Awareness Week 2018

Posted on 19th September 2018 by

This week is Balance Awareness Week, a week to raise the awareness of the conditions that can affect Balance Awareness Week 2018 one’s balance and the importance of something we all too often take for granted.

Close your eyes and stand on one foot. It’s hard right? Now imagine having that same disoriented feeling on two feet, and with your eyes open. Balance is something most of us take for granted. It’s automatically hardwired into our bodies at birth, evolving and adapting as we grow and age. While basic balance is innate, some of us are able to perfect or even master our balance through exercise and practice. We don’t often think about our balance—until of course, we lose it.

There are many different reasons why balance can be a struggle. Some are linked to our vestibular system or inner ear, some can be neurological in origin, affecting our brain and nervous system.

The key reason for loss of balance we see here at goPhysio is ageing. As we age, we often experience a loss of strength and flexibility and a decline in our ability to balance as well. All too often, these are seen as an inevitable part of ageing, but this doesn’t have to be the case.

Balance is something you can train and improve.

Just like muscle strength and flexibility, you can and improve train your balance.

By improving balance, you will:

  • Reduce your risk of falling as you get older
  • Stay independent for longer
  • Keep enjoying being social and active

How can you improve your balance?

  • Do some regular exercises to train and challenge your balance safely. These can include standing on 1 leg, going up and down onto your tip toes, standing and closing your eyes, walking a ‘tightrope’ – please get in touch if you’d like more information about some great balance exercises.
  • Get out and about and keep mobile, walk on a variety of surfaces and terrains to challenge you!
  • Try some regular exercise classes with export support and guidance – our Pilates Classes and Active Ageing Classes are perfect.

Read More 

Keeping Active As We Age

Active Ageing Exercise Classes in Chandlers Ford

Why lean muscle mass is so important

Fall Proof – Exercises for older people

 

 


The Common Sense Guide to Exercise & Movement

Posted on 24th August 2018 by

The benefits of exercising, moving more and being active are undeniable. We must hear and see articles, posts and headlines about this on a daily basis. But sometimes it can all seem a bit daunting – what’s best to do, how often, why, is it enough, is it too much….???? So many questions! It’s sometimes so overwhelming that it seems easier not to do anything.

So, when we saw this great Common Sense Guide to Exercise & Movement from Cor-Kinetic, it was too good not to share with you. 20 fantastic, simple and easy to follow tips to help guide you to being more active!


Common Sense Movement Exercise Guidelines

If you need any help, guidance or support in your health & wellbeing journey, you can access our wide range of specialist services. These include:

Physiotherapy or Sports Therapy to help you recover from an injury to make sure you can exercise or be as active as you want to be!

Rehabilitation to work on getting you back to your pre-injury condition.

Pilates classes to build your strength, stability and body condition.

Active Ageing Classes, specially designed to help older people gain confidence in exercising in a safe, supported environment.

Please do get in touch to find out more!


Love activity, Hate exercise? Do more of what you love with Physio!

Posted on 12th June 2018 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists has launched a new campaign, Love activity, Hate Love activity hate exercsie posterexercise?

It is well documented that physical inactivity is a major public health problem. This campaign sets about to help identify barriers that prevent people from being more active. It also highlights what a positive influence as Physio’s can have in promoting and supporting physical activity at every touch point.

As a team of Physiotherapists, Pilates Instructors, Sports Therapists & Sports Massage Practitioners, we all have an important role to play in promoting physical activity. We want to maximise the opportunities to discuss the benefits of physical activity and any barriers to it with our patients, and make exercise more accessible to a wider range of people.

goPhysio’s Clinical Director, Paul, says “It doesn’t have to be ‘exercise’ per se, ‘activity’ is what is great! It’s about keeping it simple, finding things that you enjoy doing that get you moving and challenge you physically. So, gardening, walking, playing tennis with friends, marathon running, taking the stairs instead of the lift, even pushing a trolley round the supermarket, they all count! That’s what’s great about this campaign, even if the term ‘exercise’ frightens you, you don’t need to be afraid of being active!”

Do more of what you love with physio is such a great term. It’s exactly what we do – help make sure you can do more of what you love doing!

So whether that’s physio or sports therapy treatment to help you recover from an injury, Pilates to help improve and maintain your physical wellbeing or Positive Steps elderly exercise classes, we run a host of services from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, Hampshire, that  help you do more of what you love.

So, what are the tips to getting started if you love activity but hate exercise?

  1. Find something you enjoy so that you’ll keep going.
  2. Set goals for yourself – big or small – to keep you motivated.
  3. Pace yourself – start slowly and gradually build up.
  4. It’s OK to ache but if pain persists, ease back and go slower.
  5. Need more motivation and support? Find someone join you!

If you need any help or support or just don’t know where to start, just get in touch. Our friendly and supportive team are here to help you.

 


The ‘Magic’ 10,000 Steps A Day

Posted on 2nd May 2017 by

May is National Walking Month – a month to inspire you to get out on your feet every day

10,000 – the magic number of recommended steps we need to do every day! But why and where has this come from?

Originally, the magic ‘10,000 steps a day concept’ was created in Japan back in the 1960s. A team of Japanese researchers worked out that the average person took 3,000 – 5,000 steps per day. However, if they were to increase their steps to 10,000 steps per day, the potential result would be healthier, thinner people!

This number wasn’t based on medical research, however, since then much research has been carried out and this seems to be the figure the NHS, WHO and other organisations have promoted to be the number of steps we should try and take every day to help improve our health and reduce the risk of many diseases.

10,000 steps equates to approximately 5 miles

10,000 steps roughly equates to 30 minutes of ‘activity’

In the UK, the NHS has published guidelines for the minimum activity levels we should aim for every day to maintain & improve our health. This includes 30 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity 5 days a week – brisk walking can be an integral part of this.

What can 10,000 steps help with?

  • Improving overall health
  • Decreasing risk of heart disease
  • Reducing body fat % and helping weight loss
  • Decreasing risk of type II diabetes
  • Increasing energy levels
  • Reducing stress

What’s good about 10,000 is that 10,000 steps a day is a realistic goal that is achievable by people of all shapes, sizes and ages. It isn’t really a magic number but a good guideline that matches activity expectations to meet recommended activity levels.

You’d be surprised how much you probably overestimate how many steps a day you actually do. Most people living a ‘normally’ active day will only do between 3,000 – 5,000 steps! So, reaching 10,000 does require some lifestyle changes and it will take some extra effort.

Read More 

The ‘Active 10’ Campaign

Increasing activity with technology

Exercise and stress

#NationalWalkingMonth


‘Shake Up September’ Workplace Challenge

Posted on 5th September 2016 by

Shake Up September Workplace Challenge

Companies and organisations across the UK are invited to take part in the ‘Workplace Challenge’ this month, in a campaign named ‘Shake Up September’. The aim of the programme is to promote sport, physical activity and health improvements across the UK’s workplaces.

With both the Olympics & Paralympics fresh in people’s minds, the Workplace Challenge aims to encourage employees to bring physical activity into the workplace by trying out as many Olympic or Paralympic sports as possible throughout this month.

Why get active in the workplace? 

We spend up to 60% of our waking hours at work and an estimated 40 per cent of people do not exercise enough, according to Public Health England. To help combat the issue, Workplace Challenge, seeks to inspire businesses and encourage workers to get active in and around the working day.

Inspired by Team GB, workers are being urged to sign up to Workplace Challenge for free and try at least five different sports throughout ‘Shake Up September’. The more activities they log via the Workplace Challenge website or mobile app, the more points they will earn for their workplace as they go for gold on a national challenge leaderboard – with prizes on offer for winning individuals and workplaces, plus spot prizes available for those who get active and get involved with the challenge.

County Sports Partnerships across England will also be running local events and activities, as well as offering a host of online offers with local businesses and National Governing Bodies covering a wide range of sports.

Research has shown that physical activity can boost morale, communication, lift team spirit, increase productivity and reduce the number of sickness absence days taken. From our point of view, being active in the workplace can really help prevent and minimise any work related injuries such as back pain, neck pain and overuse injuries or repetitive strains.

The site also has some great resources and ideas for helping encourage activity in the workplace, such as the Flexible Lunch Break Manifesto.

So, download your Sports Bingo card, sign up and get active!

#ShakeUp2016


Is technology to blame for youth inactivity?

Posted on 26th August 2016 by

Research recently undertaken by UK Active has revealed that 9 out of 10 parents blame tech for youth inactivity.

Some Facts & Figures

  • Only half of seven-year-olds are meeting recommended physical activity guidelines of 60 minutes/day.
  • 75% of the 1039 parents interviewed agreed that it is more difficult for parents today to encourage children to become physically active than for previous generations.
  • 90% think technology is partly to blame.
  • Around 10% of children start primary school obese.
  • Only 9% of toddlers are meeting the chief medical officer’s activity guidelines.
  • Just 47% of those in the study think there are enough affordable opportunities for children to be active in their local area during school holidays

As a parent myself I understand the daily battle between over ‘screen time’. I think my kids are pretty active. They all walk to school, they take part in as much sport as possible in and out of school, we get out as a family and enjoy ‘active time’ and they have a garden to play in. My older 2 also share my slight FitBit Activity tracker obsession (and love a bit of healthy competition!) and I was shocked by how little ‘physical activity’ they actually do some days, despite doing all the above.

It has made me think about the very common scenario or typical day of being driven to school and dropped off at the gate, the limited PE provided in schools, wet break (so no opportunity to move around at playtime), being driven home again for an evening sat in front of the TV/playing computer games/doing homework.

It does take investment by parents nowadays to encourage and promote physical activity. But I don’t think it’s purely technology at blame. Many families have working parents who are stretched to their limits too and time resources are scarce. We rely on our cars far too much, so we’re less likely to have physical activity like walking, scooting or cycling built into our daily routine. School sport and PE (in my personal experience) can be pretty shocking! It’s certainly not inspiring for those who aren’t naturally drawn to sport. Organised sports can be expensive and time consuming and not always accessible for everyone. Plus, screen time is often the easy option – when we lead busy lives as working parents, a few hours of quiet time can be bliss!

However, as another report published last year by UK Active highlights, Generation Inactive, inactivity is a ticking tome bomb for the NHS. Just like we want the best for our children in terms of education, nutrition, happiness etc. helping them be physically active is fundamental. We (parents & schools) have to be teaching our children healthy habits for life.

Getting kids active

  • Walk whenever you can – if you find yourself with a bit of extra time, build walking into your day. Seize every opportunity!
  • Take advantage of nature – parks, country parks, beaches…they’re all free to access (apart from parking charges often!) and great for getting kids of all ages active.
  • Arrange to meet friends in an open space for some semi-organised sports, take a ball, rounders, cricket. Once they get going, the kids often take the lead and parents can catch up with others from the sidelines!
  • Take advantage of regular free organised activities in the area like SkyRide or Junior Parkrun. There are also many free sporting activities around in the school holidays. Locally for example, Arsenal Football Club run free coaching sessions in the holidays and in the summer Eastleigh run a great Park Sport scheme.
  • Encourage kids to try something new. Many sports clubs offer free tasters. Try something different or not necessarily mainstream, you may be surprised by what they enjoy.
  • Involve kids in household chores – hoovering, helping in the garden, washing the car. They’re all physical activities, it doesn’t have to be sport.
  • Set a good example. If they see you being active, enjoying investing in your body by walking or exercising, it will be seen as a positive lifestyle choice.

With the cost of games consoles and games these days, how can it not be possible to find a cheaper alternative to be active?!


Road Safety Week

Posted on 18th November 2015 by

The message this year is to drive less and live more.

Need to go the shop for a few bits for the tea. Do you really need the car or would it be as quick to walk? You’ll probably spend most of your journey looking for a parking space when you do eventually reach your destination.

Leaving the car at home for a day will only help improve the environment by reducing on toxins released from motor vehicles.

By taking the train or the bus to work, we can all make our roads safer. It would mean less traffic, speeding up the daily commute which I think we would all agree is a major benefit.

Walking and cycling also gives the extra benefit of stretching our legs and getting some regular exercise. Even a short walk from the bus-stop to our place of work is sufficient to raise the heart rate and improve circulation. This way we can build exercise into our daily routine without feeling the need to find more time in our already busy days to undertake formal exercise, like going to the gym.

So let’s try leaving the car at home for short journeys and walking or cycling instead. You might even feel better for it!