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Eastleigh 10k 2019

Posted on 26th March 2019 by

What a glorious day we had for the Eastleigh 10k this year (a stark contrast to the snow of 2018!).

The event always has such a positive, friendly buzz around it. It’s so great chatting to runners before and after the event, hearing stories of P.B.s, overcoming injuries or personal challenges, having the comrardery of running with groups and clubs and friendships formed through running!

We massaged 172 well deserved runners and are grateful to not only our brilliant team who joined us early on a Sunday morning but also our fantastic volunteers from The Universities of Southampton, Solent and Bournemouth and Peter Symonds College to lend us a hand.

We hope you’re recovering well. Don’t forget, if you took part in the run you can take advantage of a host of race pack offers at goPhysio until 30th April. All the details of your discounted offers can be found here.

#Eastleigh10k


Eastleigh 10K Race Offers!

Posted on 19th March 2019 by

Race Pack Offers Eastleigh 10K

For the well deserved participants in the Eastleigh 10K, you should have received our exclusive offers in your race pack.

Until 30th April, you can take advantage of any of these offers:

  • Free 1-2-1 Pilates. Pilates is a fantastic addition to your running training. It helps develop strength, balance and movement control so that you can run more efficiently, preventing injuries. We run over 20 specialist Pilates classes a week. Why not come along for a free 1-2-1 with one of our Clinical Instructors to find out if Pilates could help you. Read more.
  • Free Shockwave assessment. If you’re struggling with a stubborn, long standing injury such as achilles problems or plantar fasciitis, Shockwave Therapy could be the solution. Book a free assessment to find out. Read more.
  • Free computerised foot analysis. Recurrent injuries or daily aches and pains can often be caused by your foot position. Come along and find out if your feet are causing any issues for you. Read more.
  • 15% Off Sports Massage. Helping ease post run soreness, and daily stresses, aches and pains, a sports massage is a great way to invest in your wellbeing. You can claim 15% off as many times as you like before 30th April! Read more.

To book any of these special race pack offers, just give our team a call on 023 8025 3317 and quote EASTLEIGH10K.



Celebrating the Eastleigh 10k

Posted on 18th June 2018 by

The Brain Tumour Charity
If you’d like to donate to our chosen charity for your race day massage, please click here. Thank you.

Sunday 17th June finally arrived for the postponed Hendy Eastleigh 10k event. And what a fantastic event it was!

Hat’s off to Steve and his team for pulling together such a well organised event. The friendly, supportive & positive atmosphere was palpable. Seeing all of the local running clubs in their club shirts getting together for pre-race photos and supporting each other was really amazing.

goPhysio felt honoured to have been invited to be part of the event. We were on hand from 7.15am providing pre and post race massages. Our dedicated team of Physio’s, Sports Therapists and Massage Practitioners worked tirelessly and massaged over 150 runners during the morning, as well as providing lot’s of advice and injury help to those with questions or concerns.

We met so many fantastic runners and their supporters throughout the morning. Many had never had sports massage before and commented how much better they felt after it! Some came for a massage both before and after the race.

It sounded like a great run for many, in wonderful conditions, so many people came in celebrating new PB’s. For some it was their first ever 10k, such a great sense of achievement!

 Eastleigh 10k goPhysio massage  goPhysio Team shot at Eastleigh 10k 2018  

Busy goPhysio at Eastleigh 10k  Eastleigh 10k runners massage

We were delighted to be raising money at the event for our chosen charity this year, The Brain Tumour Charity. Thank you so much to all of those who kindly donated on the day. If you came along for a massage and would like to donate, you can do so here online.

Special Offers!

Just a reminder that all race pack special offers from goPhysio have been extended to 31st July. If you quote EASTLEIGH10K you can take advantage of the following:

  • 20% off Sports Therapy Assessments and Treatments (45 minute assessment normally £68 offer price £54.40 / 30 minute treatment normally £48 offer price £38.40)
  • 20% off Sports Massage (60 minutes normally £55 offer price £44 / 30 minutes normally £40 offer price £32)
  • Free Pilates 1-2-1 worth £40

You can use these offers as many times as you like, so if you’ve picked up an injury or want a niggle looked at, take advantage of seeing one of our Sports Therapists. If you’ve had taster of the benefits of sports massage, why not set some time aside for a full appointment. If you’ve heard what wonders Pilates can do for your running – now’s your chance to give it a try! You can book an appointment by calling us on 023 8025 3317 or booking directly online 24/7 here.

Eastleigh 10k Winner
A well deserved massage for the winner of the Eastleigh 10k 2018

 

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Eastleigh 10k – 10 day countdown from Running Coach, Mike Chambers

Posted on 9th March 2018 by

Running With Us

We are delighted to feature a guest blog today from Mike Chambers, Running Coach (Running with Us)

As the Eastleigh 10k 2019 fast approaches and we all look nervously at the weather hoping there is no repeat of last years March snow, now is the time to get the final weeks of training right to ensure our legs feel ready to run when the gun goes!

In these last 10 days all our training gains have been achieved and banked and now is the time to protect our fitness. But tapering for a 10k can be tricky to get right. 

The Taper

The greatest fear among many new runners is getting to the start line tired from training in the last week, but in my experience, backing off too much is more likely to leave you feeling flat come the big day. Our bodies crave routine. If you have been running 3 times a week, keep to that in your final week – including the actual race in your weekly volume. Look to reduce volume of miles and training intensity but keep the overall structure to your week. 

So, no big efforts or hard track or hill sessions this week. 2-3 easy runs of 20-30 minutes, perhaps finishing with the final 5-10 minutes near your planned race pace will be plenty to keep your legs ticking over and familiar with the speed you will need on the day.  I also encourage a short run the day before the race. Just 15 minutes or so at an easy pace with 2-3 blasts of 30 seconds near race pace will clear your legs ready for Sunday. 

Fueling 

In a world of super foods and diet programmes and get fit quick solutions, I like to keep things simple when we think about our running nutrition.

As long as you are eating a sensible balanced diet, keep to it, no major changes and no major carb load! The small taper in your training in the last week will act as a carb load if you maintain your usual diet. Yes, to a carb based meal the night before but try and have this early in the evening. And this does not need to be super sized! That will just leave you feeling heavy on the start line. A better approach is to graze through Saturday with little and often approach to quality foods. 

Make sure your body is hydrated through those last few days, and don’t go chugging water Sunday morning…you will feel heavy…and be in a long queue for the toilet. Keep up some electrolyte in take through a sports drink on the day. Gels – realistically unless running over 70-80 minutes for the 10k, you won’t need fueling during the race, your body will have all the glycogen stores you need to fire you to the finish.

Race Day Preparation

Most runners I know are creatures of habit and getting the timetable right on the day is critical to avoid a full meltdown! This works best by working backwards from the race start time, breakfast around 2 hours before this and then maybe a light snack (banana) an hour before. 

Thinking through travel and parking on the day. Kit laid out day before. Race number pinned on and check and double check have everything you need…..remember the weather in March can vary significantly …this could be vest or t shirt, but equally we may be looking at a base layer in extreme circumstances. A layer to keep on to the very last minute also worth having

Race day is about trusting in your training and committing to what you set out to do, be it just get round or chasing that PB. Visualise achieving your goal, crossing the line and getting the medal and t-shirt will help you to make that your reality.

So, to all of you doing your first 10k, chasing a new PB or whatever your motivation for getting out there on race day, smile, commit to your pace and the very best of luck.

Mike Chambers

Running Coach, Running with Us

 



Transitioning from Parkrun to 10k

Posted on 1st January 2018 by

Parkrun started back in 2004 when 13 runners got together on a blustery day in Bushy Park, Teddington, UK. It is now an international family of over half a million runners (and Parkruncounting). The Saturday morning 5km is a regular event in many diaries. With the Hendy Eastleigh 10k and many other longer distance running events round the corner, having nailed a 5k, you may have your sights set on more of a challenge!

So, how do you make the leap from 5k?

When you first started running you probably followed a plan and gradually increased the distance and your body adapted to allow you to run 5km quite happily. Now you want to be able to run even further, this may seem daunting at the beginning. So why not go back to basics and follow the same principle you had when training for 5km.

  1. Set yourself a goal for when you want to be able to achieve 10km, maybe book yourself onto a 10km race, like the Hendy Eastleigh 10k, so you have a goal in mind.
  2. Once you have your goal, follow a training plan that gradually increase your distance each week. There are lots of apps that enable you to enter a date and a distance goal and work backwards and formulate a training plan for you. Just make sure it’s realistic, too much too quickly can overload your body and not give it time to adjust, which is a risk for picking up an injury.
  3. Why not join a running club or seek help from a running coach for advice, tips, and tricks to help your transition from 5km to 10km.
  4. Ensure you have varied distance and speed runs within your training. Use hills and interval training too to add different dimensions to your training.
  5. Listen to your body, if increasing the distance is too hard one week, don’t beat yourself up. Do what you can, the training plan is just a guide.
  6. Allow your body to recover, have rest days. If we don’t allow ourselves rest days, the body does not have time to repair and recover from your last run.
  7. Add in some cross training, try Pilates to improve your movement control, strength and stability, giving you a great stretch and recovery session. Why not go for a swim for some cardiovascular training without the stresses and pressures on you body.
  8. If you start to get a reoccurring niggle or injury get it assessed as soon as possible to prevent it from getting worse. Getting there right advice at an early stage will help prevent needing potentially lengthy treatment or rest from running long term.
  9. Listen to some music, an audio book or podcast whilst you run or run with friends to keep the training fun.
  10. Ensure you cool down, stretch, or foam roll. Try using a trigger point MB5 or MB1 ball, which is a great way to release those tight muscles before and after your runs.

Most important of all is to enjoy your training, monitor your progress and don’t panic if you are slightly behind your training schedule remember that is only a guide to help you progress.

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Runners – How to maximise your training time!

Posted on 26th June 2017 by

A lot of runners get stuck into a rut of running the same route at the same pace week in, week out. Whilst this is a fine way of maintaining our current fitness level it is not going to be enough to help us run further or faster. Even just adding the miles at our habitual comfortable pace will only lead to modest improvements in our endurance.

To really get the most out of our training we need to add variety. This challenges both our muscles and our energy systems in new ways to increase the rate at which they adapt to our training. Not only that but it has the added psychological bonus of experimenting with new routes and new training regimes to help keep us motivated and reduce risk of injury.

If you’re short on time the great news is that you don’t need to spend hours pounding away on the tarmac to achieve significant changes in your speed and endurance – you’re likely to get more benefit from a 30 minute higher intensity interval session than from a 1.5 hour run, although they both have their place!

There are 4 main types of training every runner should have in their programme:

  • Long slow run (LSR)
  • Tempo run
  • Speed/hill/interval session
  • Cross training

Long slow run

The LSR should be your longest (and slowest!) run of the week, the one which you gradually add miles to. This steady state sub-maximal training helps to build capillary density and increases number of mitochondria in your muscle cells which are an important part of our aerobic energy system. By doing this we increase the endurance and efficiency of both our cardiovascular system and our muscles. It also primes our tendons and bones to increase their stiffness to cope with gradually increases distances.

Tempo run

Tempo pace is described as ‘comfortably hard’. It is the maximum pace that we can sustain for approximately 1 hour. You should not be able to talk in full sentences but also not gasping for air if you are working in tempo zone.

Training in the ‘tempo zone’ means you are working at or just below your lactate threshold i.e. the point where the bodies ability to remove lactate from the blood is overtaken by the amount of lactate being produced.

As lactate levels increase the body begins to feel fatigued. Therefore by training just below our threshold we gradually increase it – this means we delay the onset of fatigue, helping us run further and faster.

Tempo runs should start with a 10 min warm up then aim to run for 20 minutes at the fastest pace you could sustain for 1 hour. As this gets easier you can gradually increase the time in the tempo zone up to 60 minutes.

Speed/hill/interval session

There are thousands of different ways to do interval sessions. These are the work outs that are going to increase your overall speed and power. They need to be short but hard – if you aren’t out of breath at the end you didn’t do it right! Don’t try to add intervals to your long runs, you won’t be able to work maximally and so you won’t get the full benefit. These sessions should last about 30 minutes in total, allowing 5-10 minutes for warm up and some recovery time in the middle. The fitter you are the shorter the recovery periods you’ll need between intervals and the more sets you can add.

Here’s a few ideas:

Intervals

Begin with: 10 min warm up, run 1 min mod-hard effort: 1 min easy jogging x 5
Progress to: 10 min warm up, 1 min max effort with 90 secs recovery x 10

Hill training

Begin with: 10 min warm up, 3 x 30 secs moderate effort uphill, walking back down
Progress to: 5 x 1min hard effort uphill, jogging back down with 30-60secs rest in between sets
Start with smaller hills then progress to steeper ones!

Cross training

Cross training means doing something other than running! This allows ‘active rest’ – working different muscle groups to running which prevents muscle imbalance but also training our running muscles in different ways to allows greater strength adaptations without overloading the tendons and joints.

Low impact options are great so try swimming or cycling for cardio. Pilates helps to build up your core postural muscles, making you more efficient when you run, and resistance training using relatively light weights and high repetitions allows you to strengthen and tone muscles without gaining muscle mass.

If you’ve got a race coming up, like the Winchester Half Marathon, which is particularly hilly, mixing up your training is crucial.

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Post Marathon Recovery Tips

Posted on 23rd April 2017 by

Whatever your running challenge, whether you’ve run a full 26.2 miles at The London Marathon, ABP Southampton Marathon, the 13.1 miles ABP Half or taken part in a 10k or 5k run, these events can take their toll on your body and mind.

What you do post race plays an important part in your recovery, just like your training and race preparation.

Here’s our top tips to maximise your recovery

  1. Keep hydrated, drink plenty of fluids following the race and in the days after.
  2. Take a bath in Epsom salts and alternate this with a contrasting cool bath or shower to really stimulate circulation.
  3. Make sure you keep moving. However tempting it is to just collapse in an exhausted heap and have a few relaxing days, if you can keep your body lightly active it will help your recovery. Doing some gentle alternative exercise such as swimming or yoga can really help in the week or so after an event. It can take about 2 weeks post marathon for your muscles to return to full strength, so ease back into running gradually.
  4. Increase your protein intake following the event to aid the recovery process.
  5. Invest in a post event sports massage. This will help ease any muscle stiffness and soreness, and improve recovery rate. The best timing for a light massage is 1 to 3 days post event, or 3 to 5 days post event for a deeper tissue massage. You can also use a foam roller, massage stick or massage ball to ease up and loosen out tight areas.

Read More: Exercise Pain – What you need to know about DOMS

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