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goPhysio Joint Focus: The Shoulder

Posted on 25th March 2017 by

The shoulder joins the arm to the trunk and is the most mobile, yet unstable joint in the body.

The ‘shoulder complex’ is actually made up of 4 joints

  • The shoulder joint itself known as the Glenohumeral joint. This is a ball and socket type of joint between the head of the upper arm bone or humerus and the glenoid cavity of the scapula or shoulder blade.
  • The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is where the clavicle or collar bone meets the acromion of the shoulder blade.
  • The sternoclavicular (SC) joint is where the clavicle (collar bone) meets the chest bone or sternum.
  • The scapulothoracic joint is where the shoulder blade meets with the ribs at the back of the chest.

Shoulder anatomy

The shoulder joints rely on a complex, synchronised pattern of muscle and joint interaction to maintain stability and function of the whole arm.

This excessive mobility is its main weakness, causing it to become easily injured through trauma or overuse.

Common Injuries

Here are some of the most common shoulder area injuries and problems we tend to see

  • Rotator cuff injuries and tendonopathies
  • Shoulder impingement or subacromial impingement
  • Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis
  • Muscle and ligament tears
  • Tendon problems such as biceps tendonopathy
  • Traumatic shoulder dislocation
  • Recurrent shoulder dislocation
  • Fractures of the humerus or collar bone
  • Acromioclavicular joint sprains
  • Sternocalvicular joint sprains
  • Bursitis

Shoulder injuries are often associated with certain sports such as swimming or tennis, where a large degree of shoulder flexibility is required, along with repetitive and large movements. The shoulder is prone to overuse injuries.

It can also suffer a wide range of traumatic injuries, such as fractures, dislocations, sprains and tears as a result of a fall, impact or collision during sport or every day life.

There are many physiotherapy treatments that can help with shoulder problems. We always start by carrying out a thorough assessment to find out exactly what’s going on with your shoulder. Once this is established, you’ll start a comprehensive rehabilitation programme. This may be a combination of hands on treatments such as soft tissue work, taping, trigger point release, mobilisations or acupuncture and a big focus on exercises to regain strength, flexibility and endurance in your shoulder. A crucial part of recovery from a shoulder injury is making sure all the joints and muscles are working well together, a key part in preventing any future problems.

If you’ve suffered a shoulder injury or are experiencing pain in your shoulder area, give us a call or book an appointment online at our Chandlers Ford Physiotherapy Clinic in Hampshire.

 


Acupuncture Myth #3 I’ll be covered in plasters!

Posted on 9th March 2017 by

Acupuncture Myth I’ll be covered in plasters after my acupuncture session

Reality Very rarely do you bleed after having acupuncture – the needles are so fine and your skin is so elastic, the point where the needle has been closes up with no need for a plaster! You probably won’t even see where the needles have been.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Myth #2 “I can’t give blood if I’ve had acupuncture”

Posted on 8th March 2017 by

Myth: I can’t give blood if I have acupuncture

Reality: If you have had acupuncture by a qualified healthcare professional registered with a statutory body (such as the AACP), you are safe to give blood. If the acupuncturist is not registered then you can’t give blood for 4 months. You may need to ask your acupuncturist for their registration number to take when you give blood.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Awareness Week Myth 1 ‘Acupuncture is painful’

Posted on 7th March 2017 by

This week is acupuncture awareness week and so we’re dispelling some commonly held myths about this treatment technique.

Myth Acupuncture treatment is painful

Reality Acupuncture isn’t always completely pain-free, but it’s not as bad as you might think! Acupuncture is less painful than having blood taken or an injection, as the needles are so fine. You may feel a tiny ‘sting’ as the needle goes in, but many people don’t feel anything. The discomfort you tend to experience with acupuncture while the needles are in place is a deep dull aching, known as ‘De Qi’. According to traditional Chinese practice is the stimulation of energy at that point and is a good sign the needles are doing their job.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek


Acupuncture Awareness Week – Getting To The Point

Posted on 6th March 2017 by

This week is acupuncture awareness week – but what is acupuncture and how does it work?

In this article, we take a look at some common ways acupuncture is used in physiotherapy.

What is acupuncture?

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese therapy which involves inserting very fine needles into the body to help remedy a huge variety of conditions. With a 2,500 year history and a growing body of medical research confirming its effectiveness, acupuncture has now been widely accepted by western healthcare. Although acupuncture is often sought out as a last resort after all ‘normal’ treatments have failed it is fast becoming one of the most popular complementary therapies in the UK with 2.3 million acupuncture treatments carried out each year. Have a look at some of the conditions acupuncture can be beneficial for in these fact sheets. 

What can acupuncture help?

Traditional acupuncture can treat a huge range of conditions from infertility to anxiety. In physiotherapy we commonly use it to treat pain such as back pain, headaches, muscle and Acupuncture Chandlers Fordtendon problems and osteoarthritis of the knee, as these conditions have all been shown to have some evidence that they respond to acupuncture. Because acupuncture is a calming treatment it can also help promote a feeling of general relaxation and well-being, aiding sleep which is useful in many long term pain conditions.

Acupuncture usually works best with combined with other treatments such as exercise or hands on therapy, therefore it’s rarely used as a stand-alone treatment by physiotherapists.

Is acupuncture the right treatment for me?

Your therapist will ask you a series of questions to help determine whether acupuncture is right for you. These include asking about your medical history and of course about any phobia of needles! A few reasons we might not use acupuncture include a history of epilepsy, blood clotting disorders, infection or if you are pregnant. As physiotherapists we have many treatment options for all conditions so if acupuncture is likely to help your condition your physio will recommend it but if you’re not a fan of needles that’s fine too – we have plenty of other options!

How does it work?

There are many different theories – in ancient Chinese medicine they believe that acupuncture helps clear your energy channels (meridians) and restore your natural balance of energy coming in and leaving the body (yin and yang). In western medicine research has shown that acupuncture can help to ‘switch off’ the body’s pain response by giving it an alternative sensation which blocks out the barrage of pain signals to the brain. It also releases chemicals such as endorphins and natural opioids which are both pain-relieving substances as well as improving circulation to the healing area. Acupuncture is known to promote relaxation of tight knots (trigger points) in the muscles and has a general calming effect on the central nervous system by lowering your heart rate and blood pressure.

How long are the sessions and how many will I need?

Acupuncture can be included in your normal physiotherapy treatment session, so depending on what your therapist is treating you for they may leave the needles in for anything from 5 – 30 minutes. Your first session of acupuncture is usually slightly shorter to see how you respond but the length of treatment and number of needles used may be increased as you get used to the sensation. Most people respond to acupuncture in 4-6 sessions, however this is individual and depends on your condition.

Are they any side effects?

Acupuncture is a very safe treatment – the needles used are sterile and single use, surprisingly much narrower than injection needles. The smallest are around 0.13mm wide (about the thickness of a human hair) so most people don’t feel the needles go in. It is common to get a mild tingling, warmth or heavy feeling in the area whilst the needles are in. The most common side effect is mild bruising, however some people can feel a little light-headed or drowsy after treatment.

The risk of serious harm with acupuncture is incredibly low – a study in 2006 reviewed 4 million acupuncture treatments and found only 11 serious adverse events and zero fatalities. This makes it far safer than the majority of household medicines. Looking for an acupuncturist that has trained through an accredited organisation such as the British Acupuncture Council or the Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists is the best way to minimise you risk as you can be sure the practitioner has undergone rigorous training.

Is there anything I should I do before/after acupuncture?

Try and eat a couple hours before your treatment, particularly if you have a condition such as diabetes where you could be more at risk of feeling faint if your blood sugar is low.

After treatment make sure you have time to sit and drink a glass of water before rushing off. You may also want to avoid driving after your first appointment in case you feel dizzy or drowsy.

Try not to plan anything strenuous such as vigorous exercise after an acupuncture session and avoid stimulants such as caffeine and alcohol for the rest of the day to enhance the feeling of relaxation from acupuncture.

If you think you could benefit from the combine approach of physiotherapy and acupuncture to help your recovery from a painful condition or injury, then give us a call or book an appointment online.

Read more about how acupuncture helped ease Martin’s neck pain.

#AcupunctureAwarenessWeek

 


On Day 10 Of Our Countdown Win A Sports Massage

Posted on 9th December 2016 by

Sports Massage 10 days to go until we open the clinic doors and today we’re giving you the chance to win a 30 minute sports massage at goPhysio. Let Amanda or Melissa ease away the pre festive tension, ready to help you relax and enjoy Christmas! Tight shoulders from carrying all those shopping bags, off skiing and want to help loosen up your legs?

Just like us and share this post for your chance to win!


11 Days Until Opening – You Can Win A Therapearl Hot/Cold Pack

Posted on 8th December 2016 by

goPhysio countdown For today’s giveaway, you could win a great hot / cold pack from Therapearl. Just like our page & share our post!

The Pearl Technology® contained in every THERA°PEARL pack is game changing innovation born of an age old therapy. Crafted by a doctor who knew she could offer her patients something better than a bag of frozen peas, THERA°PEARL was designed with you in mind. Whether chilled or heated, Pearl Technology conveniently holds its temperature for the doctor recommended time of 20 minutes and conforms to your body to deliver the perfect relief from your aches and pains.

Easily pliable when frozen, our Pearl Technology is cold enough to offer targeted ice therapy without sacrificing flexibility. Not stiff, jagged or uncomfortable, chilled THERA°PEARL packs stay smooth and soft on your skin as they conform to deliver soothing relief.

When conveniently heated in a microwave, the Pearl Technology in your THERA°PEARL pack is the perfect solution to relax stiff muscles and encourage blood flow and healing. Delivering consistent heat therapy directly to your desired relief area without a mess, the reusable packs are combination therapy in one convenient product.

 


17 Days To Go! goPhysio’s Daily Countdown Giveaway – Biofreeze Cooling Gel

Posted on 2nd December 2016 by

goPhysio moving dateOn day 2 of our giveaway, you could be in with a chance of winning some pain relieving, Biofreeze cooling gel.

Biofreeze is a topical analgesic that uses the cooling effect of menthol, a natural pain reliever, to soothe minor muscle and joint pain. It penetrates quickly, offering relief through cold therapy.

If you’re in pain, Biofreeze is a great way to ease this, helping your recovery.

To be in with a chance to win, like or follow us and don’t forget to share the post on social media. The winner will be randomly selected and announced tomorrow!


Improving Flexibility: Yoga From A Physio’s Perspective

Posted on 28th November 2016 by

Physiotherapist & Pilates Instructor, Gemma, recently attended a specialist yoga course for Physiotherapists. On this blog she gives a great overview of yoga and also highlights how it compares to Pilates.

Yoga combines movement, meditation and awareness of breathing through a sequence of exercises. This has many positive effects on the body from improving flexibility and strength, to aiding relaxation, body awareness and self-discipline.

Although originating in India, some 5000 years ago and linked with Hinduism and Buddism, Yoga is a non-religious practice and has been adapted into an exercise class format by Western cultures.

Is it different from Pilates?

Yoga and Pilates share many similarities and some of the exercises are indeed identical. However the philosophy and focus are different. Pilates works on training the core muscles, developing stability and improving normal posture. Whereas yoga focusses more on improving flexibility and mind-body awareness; tending to be a more flowing sequence of movements.

Which is better for me?

Generally if you are very bendy (hypermobile), Pilates will be better for you to help gain stability and strength through your joints, and if you’re stiff yoga is great to improve flexibility. However both types of class can be adapted to suit you so a lot of it comes down to personal preference.

What are the health benefits of yoga? 

Yoga can help improve:

  • Strength
  • Flexibility
  • Balance
  • Prevent falls
  • Help with arthritis
  • Reduce lower back pain
  • Reduce depression, anxiety and stress levels

Do I have to do headstands?!

No! Headstands are just one exercise from a branch of traditional yoga poses known as ‘inversions’ but other inversions can include simply laying on your back with your feet up against a wall which is much more achievable for most of us!

How hard is it?

Yoga can be as hard as you want it to be… from pure meditation and breathing to an aerobic sweat-inducing power yoga class and everything in-between!

Yoga can be done by people of all ages; from adolescents to octogenarians it can have significant health benefits. It doesn’t matter how flexible you are or how good (or bad) your balance is as all the exercises can be tailored, there are even chair based classes for those less able.

What are the different types of yoga?

There are many different forms, the most common are:

  • Hatha yoga – a simple, slow class of postures
  • Vinyasa – a faster flowing sequence of poses
  • Ashtanga – an intense and athletic ‘pure’ form of yoga postures
  • Hot yoga/Bikram yoga – done in a heated room up to 32degrees C
  • Sivananda – slow, gentle and spiritual, focusing on 12 main poses, breathing, meditation, proper diet and mindfulness

Is it better to do a class rather than use a DVD/Youtube video?

Whilst the internet has a wealth of classes online and DVDs can be a good way of keeping up practice at home, the only way to make sure you’re doing the exercises safely and correctly is to come to a class with a trained yoga instructor. They will also be able to guide you through exercises of the right level, help you develop correct breathing techniques and teach you modifications where necessary to prevent injury.

Gemma is incorporating yoga into her rehabilitation programmes where her patients will benefit. You can read one of her success stories here.

Yoga Pilates