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What’s the best way to reduce risk of injury?

Posted on 28th February 2019 by

We came across this fab infographic this week from The Strength Continuum, clearly summarising some research carried out into the most effective way in reducing your risk of injury.

reduce risk of injury

You still see it, day in day out. People obsessively stretching before and after exercising and in between exercise sessions. But the evidence is quite clear, stretching before or after exercise isn’t going to play a significant part in reducing your risk of injury, when compared to other measures.

If you’re a regular exerciser, the risk of picking up injury can often feature in the back of your mind. So what are the best steps to take to reduce the risk of picking up an injury?

According to this research, having a varied exercise programme (multiple exposure), training your proprioception (so balance and co-ordination) and working on your strength will help reduce your risk of injury. In fact, strength training reduced sports injuries to less than a third and the risk of picking up an overuse injury was halved.

Although there isn’t a magic way to totally prevent injury, taking the right steps can certainly play a big part in minimising the risk of injury.

That’s why here at goPhysio, we incorporate strength training into your recovery through a range of services. We’re extremely privileged to have an onsite facility, our STRONG ROOM! Having access to this amazing space enables us to make sure we can teach, guide and support people to work on their strength as part of their recovery process and beyond.

If you’d like some support with your injury, interested in getting started with getting strong but don’t know where to start, get in touch!



Behind The Strong Room

Posted on 27th February 2019 by

When we created our new clinic space in 2016, we were very clear that we wanted to create a specific space for rehabilitation, supervised exercise and strength & conditioning training. All the evidence and latest research into the best outcomes with training and recovery points towards strength training being the gold standard for outcomes and long term physical durability. 

So, when you visit us at goPhysio. You’ll find this dedicated space, aptly named THE STRONG ROOM! 

Why The Strong Room?

The Strong RoomAs many local residents may recall, 11 Bournemouth Road, Chandlers Ford, was once a National Westminster Bank. What does every bank need? A vaulted safe room, of course, AKA a strong room. When we purchased the property, the original strong room was still in situ.

The heavily re-enforced walls and roof no longer served their purpose and to fit in with our grand plans, this area of the building was demolished. (Not an easy task I can add!). If you’re interested you can see the demolition and building works here or you may have seen our photo journal if you’ve been to the clinic! 

In it’s place, a new space was created, to house our rehabilitation service. As an adage to what once stood there, we decided to name this space The Strong Room. Why? Because this space focuses on improving strength (amongst other things!).

What is rehabilitation?

Physiotherapy and sports therapy for people with aches, pains, musculoskeletal and sports injuries, unless you were a high level athlete with access to such facilities, traditionally consisted of treatment based around a treatment couch. Such treatments were often pretty passive, and accompanied by a programme of exercises for the injured person to complete in their own time at home. These exercises are generally progressed at the next physiotherapy session until the patient felt ‘better’ and able to resume normal activities.

However, the outcome and success of treatment often falls on adherence to exercise, the correct exercise technique and the type, timing and progression of the exercises linked to tissue healing and functional goals.

With instant access to both the facilities that offer a huge range of exercise programmes and onsite support of our specialist Graduate Sports & Rehabilitation Therapy team to augment our Physiotherapy team, this space is a great asset to what we can offer you at goPhysio.

The space is used for both 1-2-1 rehabilitation during physio or sports therapy sessions and also regular small group rehab and specialist young rehab for under 16’s. What’s great about it is that it isn’t an intimidating or scare environment. You receive full support, from a team of friendly, clinically trained specialists – a wonderful combination of facilities and expertise, all under one roof!

If you’re in the clinic, let us show you the great facilities we have on offer and  find out more about how it could help you.

#StayStrong



It’s all about LOAD!

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

We appreciate you guys don’t want to get bogged down with the science, research or evidence behind the ways we help you – you just want us to help you recover from your injury, quickly!

But to us, the science and latest evidence is important, it helps us get the best results for you in the best way. So we always get a little bit excited when we see or read what the latest evidence is saying (especially when it’s presented in a fab infographic!).

This infographic, that was shared by Trust me, I’m a Physiotherapist, really highlights the power of loading.

Load & Strength Chandlers Ford

LOADING is currently a bit of a ‘buzz’ word in the physio & rehab circles. And with good reason. In recovery terms, rest isn’t often the best way forwards but progressive loading is! As the infographic above summarises, many of the body’s tissues will get stronger if they are subject to loading.

So, what exactly is loading?

The definition of load is………..

A weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something.

In exercise or rehab terms, loading means working with some weight or resistance to place greater demands on your body. So, that can be using just your body weight, some light resistance, like bands or machines, or using weights. So, running is loading – you’re loading all the structures in your legs (bones, muscles, joints, tendons & ligaments) through the repeated pressure between your foot striking the surface with every step. A press up loads the structures around your shoulder and arms, just as a squat loads your hips and knees. Now, if you add holding a weight whilst you squat, you are increasing the load.

What is important is that loading is gradually progressed. You don’t want to demand too much of your body too quickly (or too often), especially if you’re recovering from an injury, as this will be counterproductive. It’s a careful balance.

The ultimate result of all this loading is that you will have a stronger and more resilient body. It will cope better with the demands placed upon it, making you less prone to picking up injuries, helping you enjoy an active lifestyle and potentially preventing longterm conditions such as osteoporosis.

Put simply, your tissues will adapt to the demands you place upon them.

If you think you would benefit from some guidance on realising the benefits of loading, then do get in touch. Our fully equipped Strong Room and experienced team offer that unique combination of being able to guide you on progressive loading within your own limits. We consider your ‘whole picture’ – where you are now, any injuries or conditions that affect you, what you love (or would love) to do and most importantly where you want to be. We then use our knowledge, experience and skills to tailor a programme just for you and support you as much or as little as you need.

Give us a call or drop us an email to find out more.


Train for the slopes

Posted on 1st November 2018 by

Ski holiday goPhysio

Skiing and snowboarding are a fantastic form of exercise, challenging both our muscles and our cardio vascular system in an extremely enjoyable way. Both require a significant amount of strength and endurance to stay on the slopes for the duration of holiday.  Unfortunately, most of us have not prepared enough in advance to meet the demands of what is required.

Most of the injuries we see in the clinic throughout the year are not as a result of a sudden traumatic injury, like a big fall leading to a broken bone. Instead, the most common injuries are a result of an imbalance between the loads/stresses we put through our body versus their ability to tolerate that load.  The level of tolerance we have is variable and is constantly changing in adaption to our current activity levels.  For example, a marathon runner training to do a marathon can gradually adapt to slowly building their weekly mileage over the training program so that they can tolerate the full 26.2 miles.  If they then don’t run for a few months they wouldn’t be able to run another marathon again without have to train again as their level of tolerance would slowly ebb away leaving them prone to an injury.

Exactly the same applies to skiing and boarding injuries. 

Now unfortunately, the UK doesn’t have many mountains to get some regular practice on!  This means that skiing/snowboarding tends to be something we don’t do all year then suddenly we go away and are on the mountain for 5 hours or so for 6 days a week straight.  That is a dramatic and sudden change in the load and demands we put through our body.  This increase in demand can cause the tissues to become sensitive and painful.  This then causes them to lose tolerance (their ability to cope)  and can mean that everyday activities can start to aggravate them further (more commonly known as an overuse injury). Such injuries then tend to become a vicious cycle of pain, rest, recover, start exercising again, pain, rest………a cycle that needs to be broken to avoid you having to limit what you do and have a life impacted by recurrent pain.

The good news is, you can do a lot to prevent getting such an injury on the slopes. 

Whilst it is difficult to practice skiing/snowboarding in advance of going (there are indoor slopes and dry skiing slopes around, which we encourage you to visit in advance to get used to the demands) you can still take measures to reduce the risks of such overuse injuries. By training your body in another way, we can help give it the ability to deal with the demands that we are likely to put through it over the course of the holiday. 

Over the course of a week, just imagine what physical demands are placed on your body during such a physical task such as skiing or snowboarding?!

To prepare for this, you can increase your body’s ability to cope with those increased demands by strengthening and conditioning your body, which will increase it’s tolerance levels. The best way of doing this is through doing specific strengthening exercises.  Whilst bodyweight exercises are a good start, the ideal method would be through resistance training using weights or resistance machines.

However, the weights area of a gym can be a daunting place if you’ve never used weights before, and even if you have, what are the best exercises to do? What muscles or areas should you target for skiing or boarding? How many repetitions? How many sets? It can all be very confusing!

Let us help you!

Here at goPhysio we’ve set up a specialist exercise programme aimed at getting you prepared for skiing/snowboarding and giving you an introduction into strength training in a friendly, supportive and knowledgeable environment. 

If you’re interested in getting the most out of your holiday, now’s the time to start! (You’d be shocked to hear how many people come in 5 days before their holiday with a knee injury they’ve had for 6 months, wanting us to wave a magic wand!!)

  1. Your first session will be a 1-2-1 Snow Start Up Session. In this practical 1 hour session, Physio Chris will find out more about you and your skiing or boarding level, any injuries or concerns, your fitness and holiday plans. From this he will create a bespoke, guided exercise programme for you to do at goPhysio over the following weeks. This session will be led by Physio Chris, who has previously worked with British ParaSnowSport, bringing his experience into selecting the most suitable exercises to getting you ready for the slopes.
  2. 5 x 1 hour Practical Sessions During each of your 5 following 1 hour practical sessions, you will work on your program alongside 2 other attendees, in our fully equipped Strong Room. This will be under the guidance and supervision of one of our Sports & Rehabilitation Therapists, who will be on hand to adjust your exercises, add new challenges and monitor your progress. You can do 1 session a week or 2 sessions a week – we can be flexible to accommodate your timings!
  3. Review Once you’ve come to the end of your 5 sessions, Physio Chris will carry out a review of your progress, and support you with your goals from there!

This package costs £210 (payable in advance) and you can book your Snow Start Up by calling 023 8025 3317.

Want to read more about skiing or snowboarding injuries? Take a look at these other articles:

The benefit of Pilates for winter sports

5 Tips to Survive the Slopes this Winter

More about Physio Chris and his Snowsport experience


 

 


Balance Awareness Week 2018

Posted on 19th September 2018 by

This week is Balance Awareness Week, a week to raise the awareness of the conditions that can affect Balance Awareness Week 2018 one’s balance and the importance of something we all too often take for granted.

Close your eyes and stand on one foot. It’s hard right? Now imagine having that same disoriented feeling on two feet, and with your eyes open. Balance is something most of us take for granted. It’s automatically hardwired into our bodies at birth, evolving and adapting as we grow and age. While basic balance is innate, some of us are able to perfect or even master our balance through exercise and practice. We don’t often think about our balance—until of course, we lose it.

There are many different reasons why balance can be a struggle. Some are linked to our vestibular system or inner ear, some can be neurological in origin, affecting our brain and nervous system.

The key reason for loss of balance we see here at goPhysio is ageing. As we age, we often experience a loss of strength and flexibility and a decline in our ability to balance as well. All too often, these are seen as an inevitable part of ageing, but this doesn’t have to be the case.

Balance is something you can train and improve.

Just like muscle strength and flexibility, you can and improve train your balance.

By improving balance, you will:

  • Reduce your risk of falling as you get older
  • Stay independent for longer
  • Keep enjoying being social and active

How can you improve your balance?

  • Do some regular exercises to train and challenge your balance safely. These can include standing on 1 leg, going up and down onto your tip toes, standing and closing your eyes, walking a ‘tightrope’ – please get in touch if you’d like more information about some great balance exercises.
  • Get out and about and keep mobile, walk on a variety of surfaces and terrains to challenge you!
  • Try some regular exercise classes with export support and guidance – our Pilates Classes and Active Ageing Classes are perfect.

Read More 

Keeping Active As We Age

Active Ageing Exercise Classes in Chandlers Ford

Why lean muscle mass is so important

Fall Proof – Exercises for older people

 

 


Reach New Heights This Summer With Young Rehab

Posted on 27th July 2018 by

The extra free time over the summer holidays creates a perfect window of time to get you child Young Rehab Summer goPhysiostarted in our Young Rehabilitation sessions in our Strong Room at goPhysio.

These sessions are a great way to get the kids away from screens and to develop their strength and durability to take them into next their next season of sport.  This can help to reduce the risk of future injuries as well as recovery from existing injuries and niggles.  As well as this, it can generally increase their confidence in movement and teach them another form of exercise that they continue with.

The young rehab classes start with a 45 mins session with one of our Sports and Rehab Therapists where participants are set a bespoke programme tailored to their specific goals and sport.  The remaining 4 sessions are run in groups of up to 3 people under direct supervision.

Sessions are booked as blocks of 5 sessions lasting 45 minutes which includes the initial 1-2-1 session.  Each block costs £150. These could be taken as one per week taking them up to the end of the summer holidays or could also be taken more regularly to gain some momentum and maximise what they get from the sessions.

We understand that you may be going away at some point over Summer and that other plans will come up.  For that reason we are flexible and classes can be booked in at various times each week or moved forward to another week to work around your plans.* Sessions can be booked throughout the week, including Saturday mornings and right up until 8pm during the week.

Who might benefit from Young Rehab?

Kids and teens often go through some big changes between the ages of 10 – 14 as they experience a high rate of growth. Combined with lot’s of sports and physical activities, the growing body can sometimes struggle and pain and injury rears it’s head. This can be highly frustrating, as G.P.s will often advise these youngsters to just rest – but try telling that to a competitive teenager who loves sport! Young Rehab provides a great way to support these kids in staying active and getting back to their sport as quick as possible.

We’ve had many kids experience the benefit of of Young Rehab here at goPhysio.

We’ve seen a large number of young gymnasts and dancers. These athletes often have wonderful flexibility but can lack stability, strength and movement control in key areas. This in turn can lead to some common injuries such as knee pain.

Kids who participate in sports with lots of repeated movements also frequently seek our help. Kicking a football, swimming and tennis are great examples. These youngsters are often training or competing many times a week and sometimes their growing bodies just can’t cope.

It’s not only for the very sporty kids – growing children by the very nature of growing can experience aches and pains that can be effectively managed by learning some key exercises.

If you are interested in booking your child in, or you have any questions then please do not hesitate to contact the clinic on 023 8025 3317.  We can get started immediately!

*A 24 hour cancellation policy applies. All sessions must be used within 3 months of the 1st appointment.

Read More 

Young Rehab – All you need to know

Growing Pains – Knee pain in kids and teens

Sever’s Disease

Why youngsters should play multiple sports

 

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Science & Exercise – getting you the best results!

Posted on 28th March 2018 by

When we are putting together an exercise based rehab programme for you as part of your recovery, there’s a lot that goes on behind it. To get you the best possible results and outcome, we want you to be working on the right things in the right way, not only helping you recover from your injury but helloing you building term, physical durability.

At goPhysio your bespoke programme will be constructed and tailored specifically to you using evidence-based research.

Here you can see an example of the top five exercises proven to target the glutes and hamstrings most effectively.

Hamstring Muscle activation

Gluteus Medius muscle activation

Gluteus maximus muscle activation

So, if you want an effective recovery plan from your injury, read more about our bespoke small group rehabilitation here.


Hot OR cold?

Posted on 16th January 2018 by

It’s a common dilemma, you’ve picked up an injury but aren’t sure whether to put ice on it or use heat? Both can be great at relieving pain from an injury, but in some instances it’s better to use heat and in others cold.

So, take a look at our quick reference to guide you!

Hot or cold for injury

This article provides general advice and does not replace individual medical advice. Before you treat an injury yourself, if you are concerned about your symptoms or have specific questions, please seek appropriate medical attention.

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Treatment of Calf Pain in Runners

Posted on 11th August 2017 by

Calf pain for runners is common complaint. Your calf muscles are used extensively and repeatedly during running, so it’s no surprise that sometimes they can become overloaded and develop pain. Here’s a great infographic from Tom Goom from the PhysioEdge series of podcasts, that highlights the recommendations for the treatment of calf pain.

So, what does it mean for you if you’re a runner with calf pain?

  1. Exercise Therapy is a crucial part of the treatment of calf pain. Exercises should be specifically targeted to increase your calf’s capacity for the demands of running. There are some great examples below. Your Physio would be able to identify exactly where any weakness may lie and subsequently advise on the most effective exercises for you. It may not only be your calf muscles that are weak, muscles around your hip and knee support the work of the calves during running, so strengthening these muscles is crucial too. Pilates is great for this! And don’t forget your feet. Working on the static strength of the muscles in your feet that bend your toes can help your running technique.
  2. Neural Mobility is how well your nerves ‘slide’ or move in your body. We all know that our joints and muscles move and stretch but our nerves also have to be able to move freely. When they don’t, this itself can cause pain and restricted flexibility. Reduced neural mobility may not be local to your calf, it could be originating from a more central source (your back/spine). Your Physio would be able to identify whether you have reduced neural mobility and advise on the best exercises to improve neural mobility. It may be that some manual therapy would help too.
  3. Training Loads, so distance, time, speed, terrain, will all have an impact on calf pain. Our aim is to always try and keep you running wherever we can (always keeps runners happy!). So, we offer customised advice in modifying your load to keep you running whilst your calf pain is addressed. This is not always possible though and there are cases where resting from running and doing some specific rehabilitation is essential to your recovery.
  4. Gait Retraining can have a massive impact on recovery and prevention of calf pain. Your running technique and style can improve your efficiency of your running and reduce demands on the structures involved in running. Here at goPhysio we offer a specialist Running Rehab service, where a biomechanical and video running analysis is carried out to guide any beneficial changes to your running technique. Small adjustments to technique can often have a massive impact on your running.

Treatment of calf pain in runners

The trap many runners fall into when they get calf pain is to stop running, rest completely until their pain is gone and then go straight back to their normal running routine. Then they’re frustrated when the pain comes back again and they repeat the cycle. When you pick up an injury, particularly an overuse injury like calf pain, it is crucial to identify and address the cause to prevent the potential long term cycle of injury.

Read More

What’s physiotherapy got do with a dripping tap? Overuse injuries explained.

Top 6 Pilates Exercises for Runners

Top Tips for Injured Runners

Running Rehab Service


The Benefits of Group Physio and Rehab

Posted on 6th July 2017 by

A recent study from Canada has highlighted the benefits of attending group physiotherapy, for patients following a total knee replacement.

The study demonstrated that patients who participated in group-based physiotherapy after joint replacement surgery achieved statistically and clinically important improvements in mobility and function, and with similar satisfaction levels as patients who receive one-on-one therapy.

It’s not only following surgery that people can benefit from physio and rehab in a group setting, anyone recovering from an injury can reap the rewards!

Having our group rehab sessions now in full swing at goPhysio – here’s some thoughts as to why group physio can have such a positive impact!

  • Connection with other people – Often, when you’ve had an injury or a recovering from surgery, it can be a very lonely time. In a group situation, you can gain positive connections with others, working towards a common goal and helping support each other.
  • Amalgamating social and exercise – Sharing an experience with others brings a social context to rehab. This can help increase enjoyment and motivation, key indicators in longer term success and outcomes.
  • Context – Everyone has days they may struggle or relapse slightly, but you’re not alone. Sharing stories or experiences with other people helps give context and perspective to your recovery and helps ‘normailse’ things. You will also get words of encouragement when others notice how well you are doing (when it may feel to you that progress is slow).
  • Commitment and motivation – Exercising as part of a group helps you commit to your goals, you are more likely to help support your peers and be motivated to continue.

And if group rehab isn’t your thing, we also offer a 1-2-1 rehab service so you can be provided with a structured rehab programme to go and do in your own time at home or in the gym.

gophysio Rehab goPhysio Rehabilitation

Group Rehab Chandlers Ford Rehabilitation Southampton

Group Rehab Chandlers Ford Group Rehab Southampton

goPhysio Rehabilitation goPhysio Rehabilitation goPhysio Rehabilitation goPhysio Rehabilitation

Read More

Group Rehabilitation at goPhysio

1-2-1 Rehabilitation at goPhysio

Rehabilitation: Why it’s crucial to you and your performance

Why The Strong Room?

 

 

 

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