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Sever’s Disease

Posted on 13th August 2017 by

What is Sever’s Disease?

Sever’s isn’t really a ‘disease’ as such. Sever’s is an inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel, which occurs in growing, adolescent children.

What causes Sever’s?

As children go through their ‘growth spurts’, bones will grow faster than muscles and tendons. Because of this, in Sever’s, the tendon at the back of the heel (Achilles tendon) pulls at the heel bone. Thus, due to repetitive stress, it is particularly common in active children.

Sever's Disease How is Sever’s diagnosed?

Sever’s is pretty easy to diagnose through a thorough assessment. The history, your symptoms and the pattern of the problem will paint a picture that leads to the diagnosis. A thorough assessment involves matching the symptoms reported to a physical examination of the heels, alongside discussing activity level and participation in sports.

What might Sever’s feel like?

Sever’s presents as pain in the back of the heel, often present in day to day activities such as walking, and made worse during or after physical activity – especially sports involving running and jumping.

How do the symptoms of Sever’s progress?

The pain caused by Sever’s tends to be directly linked to activity levels. What’s most frustrating about this is that it’s often the most active kids that suffer with it, so limiting their activity can be quite distressing.

The condition may get worse and may be more difficult to treat if you ignore the symptoms and carry on high levels of activity through it. Therefore, without the correct management, the symptoms of Severs can persist until growth stops. Whilst there is no direct treatment that can stop the pathology of Severs, there are many things physiotherapy can do to help relieve and manage the symptoms.

What is the best treatment for Sever’s?

One we have a diagnosis of Severs, we will really focus on helping your child manage the condition.

This can include:

  • Advice on pain relief and managing the symptoms
  • Guidance on sport and activity modification, a term we call ‘relative rest’
  • Exercises to stretch and strengthen muscles in the lower limb, foam rolling can be great
  • Shoe modifications, such as heel pads that cushion the heel as it strikes the ground, heel lifts that reduce strain on the Achilles tendon by raising the heel, or arch supports that hold the heel in an ideal position

The outlook for Sever’s 

The sooner Sever’s is managed, the quicker recovery can be, and with correct management, the condition usually goes away within a few months. The problem does not cause problems later in life.

Related injuries

Severs in very similar in nature to Osgood Schlatter’s of the knee. However, other conditions we consider when children present with heel pain include:

Severs Case Study 

11 year old Joe came to see us complaining of a 3 month history or worsening heel pain. Joe was an extremely enthusiastic grass roots football player, training and playing 4 times a week. He’d recently started trampolining, which he loved! However, his heel pain was starting to get so severe, it was limiting his ability to play football, with him often limping off the pitch after 30 minutes.

When he came to see us, we found he had:

  • A significant tender spot on both heels
  • Naturally flattened arches in his feet
  • Very tight, painful and tense calf muscles

Joe’s Management 

The first steps we took, were to educate and reassure Joe about his condition. Sometimes this reassurance and understanding can be a turning point in recovery – it isn’t anything serious and it will get better!

We taught Joe’s parents a treatment protocol, called The Strickland Protocol. This is a set and timed programme of rest, muscle release and re-introducing activity and stretching.

Joe was advised a short period of complete rest from any impact activity (with the reassurance of the long term gains of this) with a gradual re-introduction. In Joe’s case, he was advised to stop trampolining and football completely for a few weeks, to try and help settle his symptoms as they were so severe. He started a daily treatment programme at home that his parents could help with – the aim of this was to reduce tension of calf muscles and start to reduce the pull on his heel bone. He also used ice on his heels and painkillers when necessary to ease the pain.

As his symptoms eased, stretching and foam rolling of his calf muscles was started and activity was carefully re-introduced.

It was concluded that trampolining was likely to have been one of the main triggers of his problem. Given that returning to football was his upmost priority, it was decided in conjunction with his parents that returning to trampolining was not advisable. Instead, Joe started swimming regularly. The benefits of this were that swimming would help maintain and improve his fitness, whilst being low impact and not irritating his heel pain. He gradually increased his football playing time, using pain levels as a guide and building on time gradually.

We also guided him on his choice of footwear – to wear supportive and cushioned trainers and school shoes and a really good, supportive football boot. Many of the football shoes that are now on the market look great but offer absolutely no cushioning or support. Particularly astro boots, which are like running around on a piece of cardboard! Joe opted for a traditional leather boot, which offered much more support. He was advised to minimise playing in astro boots as much as possible.

It has taken almost a year of guided management for Joe to return fully to normal activity free from pain. What has reassured Joe and his parents is that they understand what’s going on, have made the right informed choices to help recovery and enabled Joe to get back to doing what he loves, playing football! Much of this management was advice and education and Joe doing a regular programme of exercises himself at home.

Had he not had the right advice, Joe could have gone down a route of spiralling inactivity and developed secondary issues – not only physical but also psychological, if he couldn’t play football.

If you’d like some advice on managing Sever’s or any other growing pains, give us a call on 023 8025 3317. 


 

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“Why do I have tennis elbow if I’ve never played tennis?”

Posted on 4th July 2017 by

It’s a question we hear a lot in physio! The term ‘tennis elbow’ is the commonly used (and much easier to pronounce) name to describe what’s actually known in the medical world as ‘lateral epicondylalgia’ or ‘lateral epicondylitis‘, meaning ‘pain on the outside of the elbow’.

ennis elbow physioTennis elbow is a common type of elbow pain which occurs when the tendon of our wrist extensors muscles (the muscles that life our wrist up) becomes inflamed and irritated where they insert on the outside of the elbow. Because these wrist extensor muscles are worked extra hard in tennis which requires both a strong grip and explosive flicks of the wrist for back hand shots, these two names became synonymous.

However tennis elbow can occur in any one who does a lot of repetitive wrist extension or gripping activities and can be classified as a repetitive strain injury (RSI). In fact, it probably affects more non-tennis player’s than tennis players! Outside of the tennis world we see it a lot in office workers who spend long periods of time typing or who have a poor ergonomic set up, who come to see us with pain in their elbow.

In the early stages, tennis elbow can be treated effectively with rest, ice, anti-inflammatories and modification of activities to change the way you lift, grip or type. For example, lifting an object using your hand palm-up rather than palm down uses different muscle groups so affords the wrist extensors some rest.

Using ergonomic keyboards and mouse set ups (e.g. vertical mouse) can also reduce the strain on these muscles.

Unfortunately, this condition can be persistent if you don’t change the aggravating activities or have left it and it has become a longer term issue. If the above simple strategies aren’t working for you, you’ve been experiencing problems for some time or the pain is limiting you doing what you want or need to do everyday, come and seek our help. We’ll be able to assess you in detail and use a combination of manual therapy, ultrasound, acupuncture and strength and flexibility exercises to speed up your recovery. We’ll also ask about your day to day activities you struggle with and offer helpful solutions to modify these, or use of an Epi-clasp strap to offload the area if necessary. Remember the sooner you seek help the quicker and easier it is to get your pain better, so don’t’ let it linger on!

Read More

Tennis Elbow

Anyone for tennis?

Tennis injuries

Golfing injuries

What’s physiotherapy got to do with a dripping tap?

 


Anyone for tennis?

Posted on 29th June 2017 by

Wimbledon 2017With Wimbledon starting next week our attention turns to the tennis courts. Whilst you’re enjoying the obligatory Pimms, strawberrys and cream this year you may feel inspired to get on the court and try it out for yourself. In this blog we take a look at the health benefits of tennis, how it can help you get in shape this summer and importantly how to avoid injury.

Tennis is truly a full body work out; a single 1 hour game can burn as many as 600 calories and requires cardiovascular fitness, endurance, quick reaction speed, power and flexibility. The professional’s can serve a ball at over 130mph and will use both brain and brawn to defeat their opponent.

The good news is you don’t need to be super fit to get started, tennis is suitable for people of all ages and abilities so whether you’re a complete novice or a competitive club player it’s a great way of keeping in shape, developing tactical skills, as well as enjoying the social side of things off the court.

New to tennis?

If you’re new to tennis, start with a friendly game, aiming to keep the ball in play for as long as possible. This will help you learn hand-eye coordination skills and sharpen your reaction time. If you’re not used to regular exercise a doubles game means a little less running around and doesn’t require quite as much flexibility to reach the ball.

Tennis can be a great way to meet new people or get the kids more active over the summer holidays. Playing regularly can help to lower your resting heart rate and blood pressure, improve your metabolic function, reduce cholesterol and body fat, improve co-ordination and increase bone density. It can even help combat stress and anxiety.

Take a look at the following local opportunities to play tennis:

Hiltingbury Tennis Courts – Get yourself a key card for just £10. You can book courts or pop along for open access.

Eastleigh Park Sport – are running a range of tennis sessions this summer for 8 – 16 year olds for just £1 a session!

Find your nearest tennis court here, on the LTA website.

Tennis for kids gives 5 – 8 years olds an opportunity to learn the basics of tennis in a free 6 week course.

Avoid Injury

tennis racquet grip sizeTo avoid injury make sure you get the basics right first – if you have current injuries or health problems get them checked out by a physiotherapist or by your GP before you start playing.

Make sure you pick an appropriate beginners racquet with the correct grip size to avoid hand and wrist injuries. Your local sports shop should be able to help you with this but as a guide you should have a finger width of space between your thumb and fingers when gripping the racquet.

A dynamic warm up for 10 minutes before you play should include jogging, heel raises, lunges, trunk rotations and arm circles as a minimum. Make sure you stretch the major muscle groups after playing to avoid post-exercise muscle soreness.

Getting coaching on proper technique will ensure you don’t develop bad habits early on which could increase your risk of injury. It also means you learn all the skills you require to develop your game quickly.

As tennis is a relatively high impact sport make sure you alternate it with low impact exercise such as swimming or yoga to help improve muscle balance and flexibility.

Read More 

Tennis Elbow

Tennis Injuries

#GoHitIt

 

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Top tips for injured runners

Posted on 28th June 2017 by

Having an injury can be a frustrating time for a runner, particularly when you have an event looming. How do you maintain your fitness when you can’t run?

Here’s our top tips to keep your physical and mental health in tip top condition whilst you’re recovering.

  1. Can you still run at all without increasing your pain? For most people maintaining some level of running is going to be better for them than complete rest as it helps prevent deconditioning both of the muscles and of the cardiovascular system. This one will depend on your injury so its always best to seek professional advice from a physiotherapist. Try taking out hills and speed work, go back to short, gentle runs on flatter terrain – its going to be much better to keep up short frequent runs of 1-2 miles rather than nothing at all even if you’re used to doing 10miles+ as this will give you a starting point from which you can progress. The main exception to this is running on a suspected stress fracture – you will not be able to run through this pain and you WILL make it worse by continuing to run. As a guide consider your pain levels during the run, but also over the next 24 hours – if your pain eases quickly when you start running and doesn’t leave lingering pain or stiffness into the evening or next day you are generally fine to keep going at this level.

  2. Cross training such as cycling, swimming and deep water running are great ways to keep up your cardio fitness whilst not running at your usual intensity. Try to match this to your normal training schedule – for example if you would normally do 3 runs a week – perhaps a 1 hour slow run, a 30 minute tempo run and a 20 minute speed/interval session try to replicate both the time and the intensity of these sessions on a bike or in the water.

  3. Work on technique – video analysis can help to find the route cause of why you are injured and specific tailored running drills and strengthening exercises can help prevent this problem reoccurring in the future. This is also going to help improve your efficiency as a runner so when your injury is healed you’re likely to be better than ever! Think about investing in our Running Rehab service – where we will analyse your running and combine this with an in depth physical assessment to identify and target any potential troublesome areas that need some work or adjusting.

  4. Don’t neglect strength and conditioning – use the time off running to work on areas of weakness. For example if you always get achy calves at the end of a run try building strength with single leg heel raises. Or if you are getting knee pain you can often work the hip and core muscles really hard without irritating the knee. A physiotherapist will be able to assess which areas of weakness might have contributed to your injury and guide you through a specific individualised strength training programme that isn’t going to aggravate it.

  5. Beat stress! A lot of us use running as a tool to keep our mental health in check so not being able to run can lead to feeling of guilt, anxiety and depression. It’s important to find another outlet for stress – cycling, swimming, yoga and Pilates can be great alternatives. Remember not to be too hard on yourself, recovery is an important part of the training process. Take this time to restore your general wellbeing – eat healthily, drink plenty of water and make sure you are getting enough sleep – this is going to speed up your recovery.

Read More 

Running Rehab

Warming up for running

How to maximise your training time

 


New report shows health benefits of swimming

Posted on 22nd June 2017 by

A new report has just been published, that outlines the health benefits of swimming.

Based on significant evidence and research, the report summarises that:

“As one of the most popular modes of physical activity, swimming/aquatic exercise confers significant physical health benefits for both healthy individuals and those with disease. Furthermore, these health benefits extend across the entire life-course – from foetus through to the frail elderly.”

As physiotherapist, we often recommend swimming to our patients. Water is an excellent environment for exercising in, not only as a regular, low impact form of exercise but also if you’re recovering from an injury. The buoyancy of water helps promote freedom of movement, increasing joint mobility and easing pain and stiffness. You don’t have to go to a pool and swim lengths! We often give people exercises to do in the water, that they wouldn’t always be able to do on dry land. It is also a fantastic way of maintaining fitness if you aren’t able to take part in your normal high impact exercise (such as running) due to an injury. Swimming can be a way to maintain cardiovascular fitness and endurance, whilst your injury heals and progress is being made at gradually returning you to your normal exercise.

A recent example of a young patient we’ve had at goPhysio, where swimming has been excellent. An 11 year old keen footballer with Severs (heel pain related to growth), Unable to play or attend football training more than twice a week due to heel pain, this young boy was becoming increasingly frustrated, starting to gain weight and loose cardiovascular fitness. Part of the management of Severs is to modify activity and treatments are limited, with time and normal growth rate  being a key part of symptom reduction. So, he was advised to start swimming regularly and his progress has been amazing. He’s felt more positive, been able to maintain and improve fitness and has gradually increased his time on the pitch, without aggravating his pain. Swimming has paid a key part in helping his endurance, strength, muscle flexibility and psychological wellbeing.

The report summarises that  for musculoskeletal health “evidence suggests that aquatic exercise has positive effects for a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions, favourably influencing pain, function and, for some, quality of life. The nature of the aquatic environment is ideally suited to individuals with MSK problems, given the reduced compressive joint force secondary to buoyancy.”

Health Benefits of Swimming

Source: The health & wellbeing benefits of swimming. Commissioned by Swim England’s Swimming and Health Commission, chaired by Professor Ian Cumming, Produced June 2017

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Osteoporosis

Posted on 25th May 2017 by

The definition of osteoporosis comes from, ‘Osteo’ – a prefix denoting bone and ‘porosis’ – implying the weakening of a structure or porous bone.

It’s the loss of boney tissue resulting in bones that are weakened and liable to fracture.

Osteoporosis

Who is at risk osteoporosis?

  • Those with low body weight
  • Maternal history of the disease
  • Smokers
  • Excess alcohol consumption
  • Low dietary calcium intake
  • Late puberty
  • History of eating disorders
  • Generally physically inactive
  • High caffeine intake
  • History of steroid use/treatment
  • Previous fractures, particularly after menopause

Who can be affected by osteoporosis?

Worldwide it is estimated that 200 million women suffer from osteoporosis. It is unknown how many men suffer from the disease but it is on the increase. Although it is commonly thought of as an affliction of the older population, it can affect people of all ages. It is more common amongst the white and Asian population and less so in black populations.

What potential problems arise from osteoporosis?

The bones become weakened and result in low bone mass and are, therefore, more susceptible to a fracture. In the UK there are an estimated 60,000 hip, 50,000 wrist and 40,000 spine fractures due to osteoporosis every year.

Other fragility fractures are also associated with osteoporosis e.g. pelvis and upper arm.

1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men surviving to the age of 80 will suffer a hip fracture.

What are the signs and symptoms of osteoporosis?

It is usually a silent disease until the individual suffers a fracture. However, there are many screening tests that can now be done and if you think you are at risk of osteoporosis from the risk factors above, it is advised to see your GP.

A Colles fracture is a break of the wrist and is most common among women aged between 45 and 65. It is often the first sign of osteoporosis.

Back pain can be a symptom of osteoporosis. Pain in the back can gradually creep up over time and your posture can become noticeably more flexed forwards. Over time, you can lose height too. Episodes of acute back pain which settle after a few weeks can be due to spontaneous vertebral fractures, caused by osteoporosis.

Physiotherapy and osteoporosis

Physiotherapy can have a key role to play in both the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. There are a number of ways in which we can help.

  • Education on appropriate exercise, posture, diet and lifestyle changes. This can be both to prevent osteoporosis or help minimise it’s impact of you’ve been diagnosed with osteoporosis.
  • Exercises to target vulnerable areas and help keep the bones and joints strong.
  • Core stability and muscle strengthening exercise programmes.
  • Balance exercises to help prevent falls.
  • Advice on water-based exercises to help strengthen core stability, improve range of movement and reduce pain.
  • Ongoing support in order to self-manage the disease in the long term including preventing and managing fractures.

The role of exercise in managing osteoporosis

Weight-bearing exercise is proven to have a positive effect on bone mass.  The less weight that goes through the bones, the more likely they are to weaken further, so weight bearing and resistance exercises play a crucial part. Specific exercise, as prescribed by your physiotherapist, target the vulnerable areas of the body. Through strengthening the muscles and keeping joint stiffness to a minimum, you are less likely to suffer from pain and the risk of fractures may be reduced.

Other exercise to be considered:

We offer a range of services at goPhysio to help support you if you are looking to prevent or minimise the impact of osteoporosis. If you’d like any help or advice, please give us a call.


Rehabilitation: Why it is Crucial to You and Your Performance!

Posted on 24th May 2017 by

By definition, rehabilitation is the restoration of optimal form (anatomy) and function goPhysio Rehabilitation(physiology). It is a structured process, designed and delivered by your therapist, to reduce time-loss from injury, promote recovery, and maximise your functional capacity, fitness and performance.

After sustaining an injury,  the rehabilitation process should start as soon as safely possible. It can run in parallel with the therapeutic interventions that your physiotherapist will deliver.

Should an injury require surgery, rehabilitation can also start before or immediately after to enhance your outcomes. This is well evidenced with research showing people who engaged in rehab prior to undergoing their surgery had much better outcomes than patients who only had rehab after surgery.

There is also evidence to show rehab is as beneficial as some surgeries for various shoulder, hip, knee and lower back conditions.

Rehab Planning

At the centre of the rehabilitation plan is you! Planning starts at the first appointment, and during our appointments, we will be gathering lots information about you and your activities to ensure we prepare you to return safely to the same environment in which the injury occurred. This is the perfect time to focus on not just your injury, but other aspects of your performance to ensure your ability to perform will be better than before!

When planning rehabilitation, it’s crucial to consider the injured structure involved and where you sit in relation to the body’s natural phases of healing. There are 5 overlapping stages to consider and doing so allows the appropriate load to be applied at all times to promote tissue healing. This is where our experience, training and knowledge really come into their own. If you’ve suffered an injury and just rest until it feels better and then go straight back to what you were doing before, you can really increase your risk of re-injury or other problems. If you’re serious about looking after your body, investing in long term durability so you can keeping what you love, rehabilitation is crucial.

On a more detailed level, as your body heals, controlled therapeutic stress is necessary to optimise collagen matrix formation, but too much stress can damage new structures.

So, choosing the level of load that neither overloads nor underlaps the healing tissue is therefore crucial to a successful rehabilitation process, and your therapist will be able to use their expert knowledge to prescribe suitable exercises throughout the process.

To do this, we ensure rehabilitation is delivered in sequential phases that has specific therapeutic and rehabilitative objectives for each phase; as well as measurable, objective criteria for progression to each subsequent phase.

Overall this acts to promote:

  • Healing of injured tissues
  • Preparation of these tissues for return to function
  • Use of proper techniques to maximise rehabilitation & re-conditioning

With all this in mind, to supplement our existing and well established physiotherapy service, we are now adding a dedicated rehabilitation service at goPhysio. Rehabilitation has always been a key part of what we do here at goPhysio. However, this has often been on an advisory basis, giving you programmes that you can take away and do at home or in your gym. The ultimate outcome of such self administered programmes can be dependent on your adherence, how well you are doing the exercises and the frequency of the programme.

With our new Rehabilitation service, you will be given the support and opportunity to take part in supervised rehabilitation sessions, either as small groups or on an individual basis. This can be done in conjunction with physiotherapy treatment or when you reach a point in your recovery when rehabilitation is all you need.

In summary, the ultimate goal of the rehabilitation process that goPhysio delivers is to limit the extent of your injury, reduce or reverse the functional loss, and prevent, correct or eliminate the problem altogether. This process is crucial to preventing re-injury and improving YOUR overall performance. We look forward to seeing you in our newly developed ‘strong room’ for your rehab sessions!

We’re very excited to be able to offer this service at goPhysio – we’ll be launching it in a few weeks, so watch this space!


New Exercise Guide For People With MSK Conditions From Arthritis UK

Posted on 15th March 2017 by

A new report has been launched, ‘Providing physical activity interventions for people with musculoskeletal conditions’ by Arthritis Research UK.

The report highlights that physical activity is a key part of a public health approach to musculoskeletal conditions and it has a range of benefits for people with musculoskeletal conditions in terms of improving quality of life and supporting people to be independent.

Musculoskeletal conditions, such as osteoarthritis and back pain, are the greatest cause of pain and disability in the UK. They’re the reason why so many people seek out our help at our physiotherapy clinic in Chandlers Ford day in, day out. As physiotherapists, exercise and activity has always played a key part in our treatment and recovery programmes, so it’s great to see this being highlighted and the recommendations supported.

Exercise can reduce joint and back pain by 25% while also improving sleep, managing stress and reducing depression, anxiety and dementia.

Physical activity is a broad term. It doesn’t have to be thought of as officially exercising or playing a sport. It can include all forms of activity, such as everyday walking or cycling, … active play, work-related activity, active recreation such as working out in a gym, dancing, gardening or playing active games, as well as organised and competitive sport.

What the report does highlight, is that a one size fits all approach is not appropriate. People with different MSK conditions will have huge variations in their physical ability, levels of disability and also lifestyles. This is where a skilled health professional, such as a physiotherapist would come in, to help advise on and tailored physical activity for the best outcomes.

How can physiotherapy help with physical activity?

  • Advise on a specific exercise programme tailored to your condition and lifestyle. As part of our service we always provide a customised exercise programme, including clear explanations and videos, which we email to you.
  • Help you modify your daily activity so that you can stay physically active, balancing activity with your condition, pain levels and physical abilities.
  • Give you confidence to be physically active. With our support and knowledge we will empower you not to be afraid of being physically active.
  • Help you manage your pain so you can stay physically active. We give you the tools to help manage and work with any pain you may be experiencing, as well as using our physiotherapy skills to help ease your pain.

Read more about arthritis and how physiotherapy can help here:

An overview of arthritis

How can physiotherapy help with arthritis?

The importance of lean muscle mass

In addition to our one to one physiotherapy service, we offer a range of other services to help support your physical activity and wellbeing if you’re managing an MSK condition. This includes our specialist Physio led Pilates classes, which are a great way to exercise gently and safely under the supervision of a physiotherapist. We are also introducing clinical yoga and Positive Steps, a supervised exercise class specifically for over 60’s keen improve and stay active.

If you need any help with your MSK condition, please do give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or book an appointment online.


physical activity older adults


Joint Focus: The Shoulder & Arm

Posted on 8th February 2017 by

Shoulder injuriesThe shoulder joins the arm to the trunk and is the most mobile, yet unstable joint in the body. It relies on a complex, synchronised pattern of muscle and joint interaction to maintain stability and function of the whole arm.

This excessive mobility is its main weakness, causing it to become easily injured through trauma, overuse or the cumulative effects of poor posture.

Common shoulder and arm injuries

Injuries we often see at goPhysio to the shoulder & arm include:

If you’re suffering with shoulder or arm pain and it’s stopping you doing what you love or being as active as you need to be, our team can help you. We offer a range of services from our clinic in Chandlers Ford, which can help identify & resolve your shoulder or arm problems and also address the prevention of such injuries.

If you want any advice, please do give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or you can book an appointment online.


How goPhysio are different

Posted on 24th January 2017 by

There’s a lot of choice out there if you want to see a Physio. As a customer looking for someone to help solve your injury frustrations and get you back to enjoying an active life, it can be a bit daunting.

Unless someone has been recommended to you, you probably head straight for your computer & Google! But what do you look for?

Here’s how we’re different at goPhysio..……….

We employ all our staff

All our Physiotherapists are full time employees of goPhysio. So what you may ask? Well we think it’s a big deal. Having a team of full time employees gives us a really cohesive force. The team’s working time is fully dedicated to goPhysio – not being pulled or split between too many commitments. This means they are there to fully support you and your treatment. Our staff don’t turn up for an evening clinic having already spent a whole day working in the NHS, already exhausted!

We have a dedicated clinic, open over 60 hours a week

Our dedicated clinic is open 6 days a week, from sunrise to sunset during the week! The fact we’re open all day, every day gives you a consistent service, with appointments at a time to suit you. If you need to contact us, you can. If you need to see someone today – more often than not, you can! We’re even open on a Saturday morning if you can’t quite squeeze in an appointment during the week.

Experienced clinicians

All of our staff have a minimum of 5 years experience working as a Physiotherapist. Between us, we’ve got a combined experience of over 30 years. This experience helps get better outcomes for you, faster. The hundreds of patients they’ve seen, combined with an environment of shared knowledge creates a dynamic, progressive and problem solving environment, giving you the best possible care and service. If you come and see us at goPhysio, you won’t be seeing someone who’s recently qualified, with minimal real life experience in resolving injuries.

Range of onsite services

Whether you’re after help with an injury or being proactive about your health and physical well being, we offer a range of in-house, services all within the clinic. Our team all work very closely together, so if you want’t to carry on your rehabilitation through coming to one of our Pilates classes, the transition is seamless. If, during a sports massage, a more serious injury is picked up, you’ll be referred on to a Physio. This integrated method of care helps support you to achieve your goals.

Dedicated administration team

Our dedicated administration team are always on hand to help you. We now have over 60 hours a week of administration support at the clinic. Whether it’s booking or changing an appointment, liaising with your insurance company or sorting out a receipt for your cash back plan, they can help. It also means that our clinical staff aren’t pulled between answering the phone, booking appointments and managing diaries – they can focus on you as their patient! When our desk or phones aren’t manned, you can even book an appointment online safely and securely on our website.

Our Clinic

We’re one of the only private practices in the area that has their own, completely independent clinic and facilities. We’re not renting a room in a GP surgery or gym or reliant on third parties for long term stability. We are completely independent and in control of our facilities which gives us stability and control. We are able to continually re-invest into the clinic to offer the best facilities and experience in the area. At the end of 2016, we moved into our brand new clinic in Chandlers Ford. This is our third clinic in Chandlers Ford, each time we’ve moved we’ve doubled in size. We spent a year renovating a derelict old building and now have an amazing new space – with large, private treatment rooms, a spacious studio, rehabilitation room and air conditioning throughout for your comfort. There’s a free on site car park for your use and great local transport links. We’ve got everything you need to have a relaxed, welcoming & supported recovery.

Local, Family Business

goPhysio is a truly local, small, family business. It’s owned and managed by husband and wife team, Paul & Fiona. It was established locally back in 2001 and has grown from strength to strength ever since. Paul & Fiona not only have a business in Chandlers Ford but live here too with their 3 children, who go to school locally. They love being able to provide such a crucial and valued service in the area. You can read more about the history of goPhysio here! 

Recommendations

Over 80% of our new customers come to us through a personal recommendation. Unlike many other physio’s we don’t fill our diaries with 3rd party external referrals from high volume/low cost work (which is now commonplace in the industry). So the patients that fill our diaries are there because they value the service we offer and results we achieve, they have chosen us based on the quality of service we offer. This is the biggest compliment and endorsement we can get – personal recommendations and returning customers! We even say thank you to those who refer a friend with our ‘Refer A Friend’ Scheme.
goPhysio Chandlers FordgoPhysio SouthamptongoPhysio Physiotherapy Clinic Chandlers Ford goPhysio Studio Chandlers Ford