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New Exercise Guide For People With MSK Conditions From Arthritis UK

Posted on 15th March 2017 by

A new report has been launched, ‘Providing physical activity interventions for people with musculoskeletal conditions’ by Arthritis Research UK.

The report highlights that physical activity is a key part of a public health approach to musculoskeletal conditions and it has a range of benefits for people with musculoskeletal conditions in terms of improving quality of life and supporting people to be independent.

Musculoskeletal conditions, such as osteoarthritis and back pain, are the greatest cause of pain and disability in the UK. They’re the reason why so many people seek out our help at our physiotherapy clinic in Chandlers Ford day in, day out. As physiotherapists, exercise and activity has always played a key part in our treatment and recovery programmes, so it’s great to see this being highlighted and the recommendations supported.

Exercise can reduce joint and back pain by 25% while also improving sleep, managing stress and reducing depression, anxiety and dementia.

Physical activity is a broad term. It doesn’t have to be thought of as officially exercising or playing a sport. It can include all forms of activity, such as everyday walking or cycling, … active play, work-related activity, active recreation such as working out in a gym, dancing, gardening or playing active games, as well as organised and competitive sport.

What the report does highlight, is that a one size fits all approach is not appropriate. People with different MSK conditions will have huge variations in their physical ability, levels of disability and also lifestyles. This is where a skilled health professional, such as a physiotherapist would come in, to help advise on and tailored physical activity for the best outcomes.

How can physiotherapy help with physical activity?

  • Advise on a specific exercise programme tailored to your condition and lifestyle. As part of our service we always provide a customised exercise programme, including clear explanations and videos, which we email to you.
  • Help you modify your daily activity so that you can stay physically active, balancing activity with your condition, pain levels and physical abilities.
  • Give you confidence to be physically active. With our support and knowledge we will empower you not to be afraid of being physically active.
  • Help you manage your pain so you can stay physically active. We give you the tools to help manage and work with any pain you may be experiencing, as well as using our physiotherapy skills to help ease your pain.

Read more about arthritis and how physiotherapy can help here:

An overview of arthritis

How can physiotherapy help with arthritis?

The importance of lean muscle mass

In addition to our one to one physiotherapy service, we offer a range of other services to help support your physical activity and wellbeing if you’re managing an MSK condition. This includes our specialist Physio led Pilates classes, which are a great way to exercise gently and safely under the supervision of a physiotherapist. We are also introducing clinical yoga and Positive Steps, a supervised exercise class specifically for over 60’s keen improve and stay active.

If you need any help with your MSK condition, please do give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or book an appointment online.


physical activity older adults


An Arthritis Overview

Posted on 19th May 2014 by

Arthritis means joint inflammation – arthro = joint and itis = inflammation. It’s an umbrella term used to cover many different types of joint inflammation.

Many people know they have arthritis or have heard of arthritis, but sometimes aren’t sure which one they have or what the different types are. This blog will cover the 4 most common types of arthritis and give you more information on what it is, which joints are affected and how it can be treated.

Physiotherapy has a crucial role in helping all types of arthritis by helping to maximise muscle strength, joint mobility and flexibility and supporting functional independence, so helping you to keep doing the things you enjoy.

Osteoarthritis

This is the most common type of arthritis and tends to develop gradually over time.

What Happens?

The cartilage at the joint becomes worn and rough, sometimes wearing out completely. This leads to osteophytes, or small bony growths, forming at the edges of the joint to try and replace the cartilage. The joint space becomes narrowed and tissues surrounding the joint can thicken. Often, there is inflammation making the joint stiff and painful to move.

Which Joints?

Osteoarthritis is most common in the hands, knees, hips, feet and spine.

How Is It Treated?

Medication: Analgesics for pain relief, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories for reducing inflammation and pain & steroids to reduce severe inflammation.

Surgery: Arthroscopy – to clean out the joint and remove any irritants & in more severe cases, joint replacements – most common in hips and knees.

What Can You Do To Help?

  • Keep mobile
  •  Strengthen muscles to help support joints
  • Learn to pace activities

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This is an inflammatory disease, affecting joints and tendons. It tends to present with episodes of ‘flare ups’.

What Happens?

Inflammation usually helps to heal the body, but with Rheumatoid Arthritis, prolonged inflammation causes damage. The immune system starts to attack joints, causing the prolonged inflammation. The joint capsule also becomes inflamed, leading to pain, stiffness and swelling.

Which Joints?

Rheumatoid arthritis is most common in the neck, hands and feet.

How Is It Treated?

Medication: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs to reduce inflammation and slow the damage being caused. Steroids may be used in severe cases of inflammation.

Surgery: Joint replacement surgery if joint function is lost or at risk.

What Can You Do To Help?

  • Learn to pace yourself and accept help on difficult tasks
  • Speak to an Occupational Therapist and Physiotherapist for help with activities of daily living.

Ankylosing Spondylitis

This is another form of inflammatory arthritis that affects the spine. Ankylosing means stiffening and spondylitis means inflammation of the spine.

What Happens?

The joints in the lower part of the spine become painful and inflamed, where the sacrum joins the pelvis. This inflammation then starts to travel up the spine, affecting vertebra at higher levels. The inflammation causes scar tissue to form in the joint spaces between the vertebra, reducing movement. Over time, the scar tissue may become calcified – turning into a bony-like tissue, which fuses the joints together and limits the available movement in the spine.

Which Joints?

Ankylosing Spondylitis mainly affects the spine, but can also affect the hips and shoulders.

How Is It Treated?

Medication: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs to reduce inflammation and slow the damage being caused. Steroids may be used in severe cases of inflammation.

What Can You Do To Help?

  • Keep active
  • Give up smoking – AS can lead to restrictions in rib movements and smoking will reduce lung function further

Gout

This type of arthritis responds well to treatment and further joint damage can be avoided with effective treatment.

What Happens?

Gout is caused by high levels of uric acid crystals building up in the joints. This happens when levels of uric acid are too high in the body – either because more is produced or not being effectively removed as a waste substance. Once the uric acid forms crystals around the joints, there may move into the joint space – this is when the pain, swelling and inflammation starts. It tends to last a few days and then settle, letting the joint return to normal.

Which Joints?

Most commonly affects the big toe joint, but can also affect the ankles, knees, hands, wrists and elbows.

How Is It Treated?

Severe acute attacks will be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. For people affected regularly, preventative medication like allopurinol or febuxostat may be given to stop uric acid build up in the body.

What Can You Do To Help?

Drink plenty of water Avoid alcohol and red meat – these can increase uric acid levels


National Arthritis Week – FREE Drop in Physio Advice Session

Posted on 15th May 2014 by

To coincide with Arthritis Care week, running from 19th – 25th May 2014, each day that week we’ll be posting a new blog article on arthritis, finishing with a drop in session on Friday 23rd from 11am – 12pm with one of or Physiotherapists at the Chandler’s Ford Clinic. You can come along and ask any questions or queries you may have on all sorts of things to do with arthritis, such as ideas and advice on how to manage your arthritis, what you can do to prevent it from getting any worse or tips on how to care for your joints and reduce the risk of developing arthritis. You don’t need to have arthritis to attend – everyone is welcome! Just give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or email us mail@gophysiotherapy.co.uk for more information or feel free to pop in on the day.


The blog topics we’ll be posting next week will include:
• What is arthritis?
• Facts and Figures
• How can Physiotherapy help with arthritis?
• How to live with arthritis
• Arthritis Research


How can Physiotherapy help with Arthritic Joints?

Posted on 21st March 2014 by

Arthritis care at goPhysio joints
Each week in the clinic we get new patients coming in asking for help and advice in looking after, treating and improving arthritic joints.
Here are some of the many ways we can help you or someone you know with arthritis:

Prevention
• We take a very pro-active approach to helping maintain a healthy, active life. As physio’s we are perfectly placed to advise on helping minimise the impact of some arthritis’s. For example – if you’ve suffered with an injury or pain for some time, it is no doubt going to have an impact on how you move. The adjustments your body can make to compensate can be incredible and subsequently this can cause wear & tear on other areas of the body. By making sure you move as optimally as possible during your rehabilitation, we minimise any unnecessary impact on other areas of your body, helping you move ‘normally’.
• By advising people on how best to support and look after their joints, often we can help to delay the onset of arthritis or reduce the impact it has on their daily lives. After all, prevention is always better than cure!
• We can look at joint movement, muscle strength, posture, gait and alignment and give tips on areas that are weak or may need work to stop them from developing into a more serious issue. You may benefit from a course of Physiotherapy, a home exercise programme or joining one of our Pilates classes to keep mobile.


Treatment
• If you book an appointment to see us to help resolve your arthritic pain, we’ll fully assess, diagnose and treat your symptoms, getting you back to your normal self as quickly as we can. We take into account your lifestyle, your aims & goals and are realistic with helping you work out what you can achieve.
• The initial assessment will look at movement, strength and function of the painful joint or region. We’ll also look at your posture and gait to make sure you are moving correctly. Treatment will be tailored to your needs and you’ll also get a home exercise programme to help with your recovery. Treatment could consist of the following:
• Joint Mobilisations – to loosen stiff joints and increase the range of movement available.
• Soft Tissue Work – including massage, trigger point release and myofascial release to relieve muscular spasm and tightness that could be limiting movement or causing pain.
• Ultrasound Therapy – this helps promote healing and reduces inflammation – key in arthritic joints.
• Exercise Programme – this could cover a variety of areas, including strength, mobility, flexibility, balance and proprioception.
• Acupuncture – to help with pain relief or to loosen out soft tissues that may be tight or overactive.


On Friday 23rd March, from 11am – 12pm, Chartered Physiotherapist Kim will be available at our Chandlers Ford Clinic to answer any arthritis related questions you may have. Feel free to pop in to the clinic that morning for a free chat.

If you would like to book an appointment or speak to one of our Physiotherapists about how we can help – just give the Reception team a call on 023 8025 3317.