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Sever’s Disease

Posted on 13th August 2017 by

What is Sever’s Disease?

Sever’s isn’t really a ‘disease’ as such. Sever’s is an inflammation of the growth plate at the back of the heel, which occurs in growing, adolescent children.

What causes Sever’s?

As children go through their ‘growth spurts’, bones will grow faster than muscles and tendons. Because of this, in Sever’s, the tendon at the back of the heel (Achilles tendon) pulls at the heel bone. Thus, due to repetitive stress, it is particularly common in active children.

Sever's Disease How is Sever’s diagnosed?

Sever’s is pretty easy to diagnose through a thorough assessment. The history, your symptoms and the pattern of the problem will paint a picture that leads to the diagnosis. A thorough assessment involves matching the symptoms reported to a physical examination of the heels, alongside discussing activity level and participation in sports.

What might Sever’s feel like?

Sever’s presents as pain in the back of the heel, often present in day to day activities such as walking, and made worse during or after physical activity – especially sports involving running and jumping.

How do the symptoms of Sever’s progress?

The pain caused by Sever’s tends to be directly linked to activity levels. What’s most frustrating about this is that it’s often the most active kids that suffer with it, so limiting their activity can be quite distressing.

The condition may get worse and may be more difficult to treat if you ignore the symptoms and carry on high levels of activity through it. Therefore, without the correct management, the symptoms of Severs can persist until growth stops. Whilst there is no direct treatment that can stop the pathology of Severs, there are many things physiotherapy can do to help relieve and manage the symptoms.

What is the best treatment for Sever’s?

One we have a diagnosis of Severs, we will really focus on helping your child manage the condition.

This can include:

  • Advice on pain relief and managing the symptoms
  • Guidance on sport and activity modification, a term we call ‘relative rest’
  • Exercises to stretch and strengthen muscles in the lower limb, foam rolling can be great
  • Shoe modifications, such as heel pads that cushion the heel as it strikes the ground, heel lifts that reduce strain on the Achilles tendon by raising the heel, or arch supports that hold the heel in an ideal position

The outlook for Sever’s 

The sooner Sever’s is managed, the quicker recovery can be, and with correct management, the condition usually goes away within a few months. The problem does not cause problems later in life.

Related injuries

Severs in very similar in nature to Osgood Schlatter’s of the knee. However, other conditions we consider when children present with heel pain include:

Severs Case Study 

11 year old Joe came to see us complaining of a 3 month history or worsening heel pain. Joe was an extremely enthusiastic grass roots football player, training and playing 4 times a week. He’d recently started trampolining, which he loved! However, his heel pain was starting to get so severe, it was limiting his ability to play football, with him often limping off the pitch after 30 minutes.

When he came to see us, we found he had:

  • A significant tender spot on both heels
  • Naturally flattened arches in his feet
  • Very tight, painful and tense calf muscles

Joe’s Management 

The first steps we took, were to educate and reassure Joe about his condition. Sometimes this reassurance and understanding can be a turning point in recovery – it isn’t anything serious and it will get better!

We taught Joe’s parents a treatment protocol, called The Strickland Protocol. This is a set and timed programme of rest, muscle release and re-introducing activity and stretching.

Joe was advised a short period of complete rest from any impact activity (with the reassurance of the long term gains of this) with a gradual re-introduction. In Joe’s case, he was advised to stop trampolining and football completely for a few weeks, to try and help settle his symptoms as they were so severe. He started a daily treatment programme at home that his parents could help with – the aim of this was to reduce tension of calf muscles and start to reduce the pull on his heel bone. He also used ice on his heels and painkillers when necessary to ease the pain.

As his symptoms eased, stretching and foam rolling of his calf muscles was started and activity was carefully re-introduced.

It was concluded that trampolining was likely to have been one of the main triggers of his problem. Given that returning to football was his upmost priority, it was decided in conjunction with his parents that returning to trampolining was not advisable. Instead, Joe started swimming regularly. The benefits of this were that swimming would help maintain and improve his fitness, whilst being low impact and not irritating his heel pain. He gradually increased his football playing time, using pain levels as a guide and building on time gradually.

We also guided him on his choice of footwear – to wear supportive and cushioned trainers and school shoes and a really good, supportive football boot. Many of the football shoes that are now on the market look great but offer absolutely no cushioning or support. Particularly astro boots, which are like running around on a piece of cardboard! Joe opted for a traditional leather boot, which offered much more support. He was advised to minimise playing in astro boots as much as possible.

It has taken almost a year of guided management for Joe to return fully to normal activity free from pain. What has reassured Joe and his parents is that they understand what’s going on, have made the right informed choices to help recovery and enabled Joe to get back to doing what he loves, playing football! Much of this management was advice and education and Joe doing a regular programme of exercises himself at home.

Had he not had the right advice, Joe could have gone down a route of spiralling inactivity and developed secondary issues – not only physical but also psychological, if he couldn’t play football.

If you’d like some advice on managing Sever’s or any other growing pains, give us a call on 023 8025 3317. 


 

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Treatment of Calf Pain in Runners

Posted on 11th August 2017 by

Calf pain for runners is common complaint. Your calf muscles are used extensively and repeatedly during running, so it’s no surprise that sometimes they can become overloaded and develop pain. Here’s a great infographic from Tom Goom from the PhysioEdge series of podcasts, that highlights the recommendations for the treatment of calf pain.

So, what does it mean for you if you’re a runner with calf pain?

  1. Exercise Therapy is a crucial part of the treatment of calf pain. Exercises should be specifically targeted to increase your calf’s capacity for the demands of running. There are some great examples below. Your Physio would be able to identify exactly where any weakness may lie and subsequently advise on the most effective exercises for you. It may not only be your calf muscles that are weak, muscles around your hip and knee support the work of the calves during running, so strengthening these muscles is crucial too. Pilates is great for this! And don’t forget your feet. Working on the static strength of the muscles in your feet that bend your toes can help your running technique.
  2. Neural Mobility is how well your nerves ‘slide’ or move in your body. We all know that our joints and muscles move and stretch but our nerves also have to be able to move freely. When they don’t, this itself can cause pain and restricted flexibility. Reduced neural mobility may not be local to your calf, it could be originating from a more central source (your back/spine). Your Physio would be able to identify whether you have reduced neural mobility and advise on the best exercises to improve neural mobility. It may be that some manual therapy would help too.
  3. Training Loads, so distance, time, speed, terrain, will all have an impact on calf pain. Our aim is to always try and keep you running wherever we can (always keeps runners happy!). So, we offer customised advice in modifying your load to keep you running whilst your calf pain is addressed. This is not always possible though and there are cases where resting from running and doing some specific rehabilitation is essential to your recovery.
  4. Gait Retraining can have a massive impact on recovery and prevention of calf pain. Your running technique and style can improve your efficiency of your running and reduce demands on the structures involved in running. Here at goPhysio we offer a specialist Running Rehab service, where a biomechanical and video running analysis is carried out to guide any beneficial changes to your running technique. Small adjustments to technique can often have a massive impact on your running.

Treatment of calf pain in runners

The trap many runners fall into when they get calf pain is to stop running, rest completely until their pain is gone and then go straight back to their normal running routine. Then they’re frustrated when the pain comes back again and they repeat the cycle. When you pick up an injury, particularly an overuse injury like calf pain, it is crucial to identify and address the cause to prevent the potential long term cycle of injury.

Read More

What’s physiotherapy got do with a dripping tap? Overuse injuries explained.

Top 6 Pilates Exercises for Runners

Top Tips for Injured Runners

Running Rehab Service


Get your running back on track!

Posted on 4th August 2017 by

Every year around 80% of runners will develop a running related injury – these are often caused by inefficient techniques, muscle imbalances, poor training habits and incorrect footwear. Here at goPhysio, we want to keep runners running so our expert physiotherapists are here to help!

Our Running Rehab service is designed for runners of all levels so whether you’re starting out with the ‘Couch to 5K’ or you’re a seasoned marathon runner; if you have a niggling injury that is affecting your running we can help. We can also offer training and technique guidance for those that are new to running, returning after a long break or are struggling to get past a certain mileage.

The Running Rehab assessment includes:

  • A detailed history of your injury, training programme and goals
  • Comprehensive lower limb strength and flexibility assessment to look for muscle imbalances
  • Running assessment on a treadmill with slow motion video analysis and feedback
  • Personalised recovery plan which may include strength and conditioning exercises, running drills, training programme or integrated physiotherapy follow up for specific injury management

Common running conditions that we see include:

Should I book Running Rehab or a Physio Appointment? 

If you can still run at least 1km we would recommend the Running Rehab service as your first port of call for the most comprehensive assessment, however if your pain is stopping your running completely its best to start with normal physiotherapy assessment and treatment until the pain settles. All of our services are integrated so there’s no problem transferring between services, in fact that’s the best way to ensure a full recovery.

The slow-motion video allows us to look at your running style from top to toe, and whilst there is no one perfect technique, it does allow us to easily identify subtle movement dysfunctions or imbalances that are hard to perceive at normal speed. These imbalances can often lead to inefficiencies and even injury in a repetitive sport like running. You will be given instant feedback on how to correct your running style with simple cues and running drills. Together with your injury history this helps us develop an individual personalised recovery programme for you to resolve your injury and improve your running performance.

Benefits of Running Rehab 

  • Speeds up recovery from injury
  • Get back to running as soon as possible
  • Confidence to progress running in the knowledge that you are not causing more damage
  • Comprehensive plan to improve running efficiency, performance, strengthen areas of weakness to help prevent future injuries
  • Achieve your running goals!

Read More

Running Rehab Service 

Common Triathlon Injuries

 


Sports Massage? Not just for the Sporting Type!

Posted on 4th August 2017 by

You think that sports massage is primarily for the gym bunnies, marathon runners or the elite sporting teams? Right? Wrong! Sports massage is a great way to help all individuals with aches and pains, no matter what type of lifestyle you lead –  it’s accessible to all! Whether you are stuck at a desk every day or are running around after the kids, sports massage can target those problem areas you have and alleviate the pain.

Through a variety of techniques, sports massage will help promote flexibility and reduce fatigue, while also emphasising on the prevention and healing of injuries or repetitive strains to the muscles and tendons. Here at goPhysio, we are able to target those long term aches and pains you’ve been having, and we’ll work together to get you back on track to a pain free lifestlye.

So, say goodbye to the lower back pain and that tension headache, sports massage will make you feel great!

We provide massage appointments at goPhysio 6 days a week, with appointments up until 8pm during the week and a Saturday morning. You can book your appointment by giving us a call on 023 8025 3317 or book online 24/7 here.

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New Sports Massage Loyalty Rewards

Posted on 28th July 2017 by

To celebrate and welcome our new team of Massage Therapists and extended massage appointment availability, we’re launching a loyalty reward scheme.

When you next come in for a massage, ask for one of our loyalty cards. Every time you come for a massage appointment, you’ll get a stamp on your card. You’ll then receive £10 off your 5th massage and £20 off your 10th massage! 

goPhysio Sports MassagegoPhysio Chandlers Ford sports massage

We now have a team of 3 qualified and experienced Sports Massage Therapists, Francesca, Elizabeth and Cameron.

Massage appointments are available daily, with additional evening appointments Monday – Thursday until 8pm and every Saturday morning.

To book your massage appointment, you can give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or make a booking online here.

Read more about sports massage.


Starting Pilates – how hard is it and how long until I feel the benefit?

Posted on 21st July 2017 by

Starting any new form of exercise can seem daunting at first, many us worry about looking silly in front of a class or not knowing what to do, what to expect or even what to wear!

The best way to combat this is to come along to one of our highly recommended 1-2-1 sessions first. This allows you to talk through any health or injury concerns with a physiotherapist so that they can modify exercises to suit your individual needs and guide you towards a suitable level class for you.

You’ll also learn the basics of what pilates is: finding your postural muscles and learning some of the common beginner exercises to get you up to speed before entering a class.
You’ll have the chance to ask questions about anything else you’re concerned about so you can start your first class in confidence.

The first class can be as much as a mental workout as a physical one whilst you get used to controlling your breathing whilst using new muscles in a new way. However no one expects you to be perfect straight away so don’t panic – the Clinician leading the class will make sure you’re exercising safely and at the correct level, as long as you are still breathing that’s a good enough start for the first few weeks so don’t worry if you can’t co-ordinate everything straight away!

As with learning any new skill it takes time. Remember that pilates is non-competitive so you will work at your own level during each class. We’ll progress your exercises gradually and encourage you to move up to intermediate and advanced level classes when you’re ready.

It can take 6-8weeks to build muscle, and much longer if you’ve had pain or weakness in an area for a long time so whilst we can’t expect an overnight body transformation, you will notice the difference if you stick with it. Our regular pilates attendees report increased flexibility, reduced pain, improved balance, improved muscle tone and strength, better posture and improved confidence to exercise as just a few of the benefits of our classes!

pilates gophysio pilates gophysio

Don’t forget – everyone was a beginner at some point and our classes provide a really supportive and friendly environment to exercise.

Read More

Rehabilitation Pilates

Flexible Summer Pilates

Centreing, the building block of Pilates

 


Healthy Holiday Guide

Posted on 21st July 2017 by

With schools winding down and the sun well & truly out, it’s time for many to pack their cases for that summer holiday!

You’d be surprised how many last minute panic calls we get from people desperate to see a physio before their holiday to have some help with their injury. So if you are carrying an injury and want to go away injury free so you can fully enjoy your holiday, get in touch now. Recovery can take time and you don’t want to be one of those people who say “I’ve had this months, I should have come sooner.” Which we hear all too often.

Holidays should be a time to relax and unwind. But the stress of packing and travelling can put holidaymakers at risk of picking up strains and sprains before they even hit the beach!

Holidays are about unwinding from all the stresses and strains of everyday life and undoing the sometimes harm we do to ourselves through the rest of the year,” goPhysio’s Clinical Director Paul says.

But “having to contend with masses to organise and a lengthy journey can often lead to awkward postures and doing things our bodies aren’t used to doing, which might cause or aggravate physical problems. Common holiday-related problems include back and neck injuries, as well as shoulder and wrist strains.

We forget we’re doing something out of the ordinary and that could include sitting for hours in cramped seats, queuing and lifting heavy bags. All that combined with high stress levels could mean putting our bodies under physical stresses we’re not accustomed to.”

Even the most simple holiday pleasures can create discomfort. For example, just going for a walk along the beach with bare feet or in the wrong footwear can lead to inflammation and pain in your knees, calves or feet, through over-stretched tendons and ligaments,” Paul says.

There are simple ways to avoid injury when doing activities that are not part of your usual every day routine.

Here’s some simple tips to avoid holiday injuries this year.

Packing a bag: Place your bag on a higher surface such as a bed, to avoid repeatedly bending over to pack. Break up your packing over a few weeks or days, so you’re spreading the preparation out and not rushing to do it quickly at the last minute, doing many repeated movements in a short space of time, which the body often doesn’t like.

Managing luggage: If you’re not used to lifting heavy items or your case is large or awkward, lift it with care. You can find yourself lifting a case many times on a journey (in/out of car boot, on/off luggage trolley, on/off check in and carousel etc.) which can take its’ toll. People often think of back problems associated with lifting, but we also see many people with wrist or shoulder injuries from travelling, having carted luggage and bags around. Minimise the amount of lifting you do as much as possible, choosing a case with wheels and not overpacking! If you’re travelling as part of a family, spread the load so you have more cases, with less weight in each. Try and choose light weight cases too, to lessen the burden. If you are lifting, use your powerful leg muscles to take much of the weight and keep the weight of the case close to your body – this just helps to minimise too much stress.

Standing in queues: There can be a lot of queuing when travelling. Use this opportunity to do some exercises! When standing and waiting, practise good posture. Stand up straight, with your tummy muscles pulled in and shoulders back and down. If you are standing for a very long time, stand as tall as possible and transfer weight from one leg to another to boost your circulation. Try some heel raises – going up and down on your tip toes, or mini squats. Circling your shoulders forwards and back and doing some neck stretches to ease any built up tension, can be good too.

Travelling: As well as standing in queues, you can spend a lot of time sitting down when traveling. When seated, try to sit with your buttocks pushed to the back of the seat. Make sure your lower back is well supported and you are not slumped. You can always take a small towel or lumbar roll with you if you like to have back support. If you are driving, ensure your position is as supported as possible and move the seat to make yourself comfortable. If you’re taking on a very long drive, read our guide to ‘Steering Clear of pain’ when driving. Whenever possible, break up your journey or get out of your seat and have a good walk around.

Holiday activities: Holiday’s can often be a chance to try out a new activity – whether it’s beach volleyball, extra long hikes, mountain climbing or surfing! If you’re trying something physical that’s out of the ordinary for you, start off gradually. Don’t go straight in 100% – especially if you’ve spent the last 6 months sat at a desk and the last 10 hours travelling! Having time to spend being more active is fantastic, but you don’t want to overdo it and pickup injury to spoil your holiday. Listen to your body and warm up for your activity suitably. Pace yourself and make sure you get time to rest in between too!

Most of all, whatever you have planned for this summer, enjoy yourself! If you can make some time for you and some rest and relaxation, away from the fast paced life so many of us now live.

If you do want to have an injury or niggle checked out before you go away, so you can really make the most of your time off – book in to see one of our Physio’s. Or maybe have a deep tissue sports massage before you go, so you start your holiday relaxed and tension free!

If you do pick up a holiday injury, you can book in to get sorted as soon as you return by using our easy and secure online booking system, available to you anywhere in the world 24/7 to book physiotherapy and massage appointments.

Happy Holidays!


Our Top 6 Pilates Exercises For Runners

Posted on 17th July 2017 by

Pilates can be a fantastic way to keep your body balanced, which is especially important in a repetitive sport like running.

Here’s our top 6 Pilates exercises to strengthen and tone your running muscles, help to prevent injury and improve your running technique and efficiency.

Foot Series

  1. Stand with your feet hip width apart
  2. Bend your knee into a squat, keeping your chest upright and knees pointing over your toes
  3. From the squat position slowly rise up onto your toes (keeping the knees bent) then lower the heels
  4. Repeat 5 heel raises per squat, 10 times

Pilates for Runners Exercises Pilates for Runners Exercises


Shoulder Bridge 

  1. Lying on your back with your knees bent
  2. Squeeze your bottom to lift your hips off the floor
  3. Slowly extend one leg in line with your body, keeping the pelvis level
  4. Lower this leg then repeat on the other side
  5. Aim to do 10 on each leg

Pilates for runners goPhysuio


Scissors

  1. Lying on your back, bring both feet off the floor so that your hips and knees are at a 90 degree angle
  2. Keep you back flat to the floor
  3. Slowly lower one leg to tap the toes on the floor, then bring it back up to 90 degrees
  4. Repeat on both legs 10 times

Pilates for runners Chandlers Ford


The Clam

  1. Lay on one side with your knees bent, hips stacked one on top of the other and feet back in line with your bottom
  2. Lift your heels sop they are hoovering 6 inches off the floor
  3. Squeeze your bottom muscles to lift the top knee towards the ceiling, keeping your heels together and not rolling back from the pelvis
  4. Repeat 20 on each leg

Pilates exercises for runners


Swimming 

  1. From your hands and knees draw your tummy muscles in so your spine in straight
  2. Lift one arm up in front of you and the opposite leg out behind you
  3. Hold this balance for 5 secs without rotating or arching your back
  4. Repeat 10 times on each side

Pilates for runners


Hip Flexor Stretch

  1. Kneel with one knee in front of the other
  2. Keep your chest upright and slowly push your hips forward until you feel a stretch in the front of the back thigh
  3. Gently tuck your tailbone underneath you to increase the stretch
  4. Hold 30 secs each side

Stretches for runners


Read More 

Centring – the building blocks of Pilates

Clinical Mat Pilates

Pilates Timetable

Running Rehab Service


Priority Booking now open for next Pilates Course

Posted on 17th July 2017 by

Priority booking for our next Pilates course is now open for current Pilates class attendees. As we’re having a break from our regular Pilates timetable over the summer, many people have requested to book the September course before the break. Here are the next course dates and classes. To guarantee a place in a particular class, please book and pay for your place by Friday 28th July. Bookings will still be available after this date but a space can not be guaranteed.

Don’t forget, if you want to keep up with Pilates classes over the summer, you can join our Flexible Summer Pilates classes.

Pilates Course Dates September : October 2017


Andy Murray’s Trigger Point Ball 1 of our favourites too!

Posted on 13th July 2017 by

Andy Murray Trp Ball Tennis star, Andy Murray, was recently pictured with a Trigger Point ball tucked firmly under his arm.

The MB5 Massage Trigger Point ball that Andy is holding is one of our best sellers in the our clinic. A great alternative or adjunct to a foam roller, it can be used to ease off areas of tension, as part of a warm up or cool down and to help get into those painful, tight areas.

goPhysio Trigger Point Massage

Suitable for use on all the major muscle groups, we often recommend a TrP release series as part of a comprehensive warm up. We also sell the smaller MB1 ball (pictured above), which is great for smaller areas such as feet and forearms.

The good thing about these products is that they are made for a number of different layers, with multi-density, making them super long lasting and very durable , so they don’t compress and loose their efficiency over time. They also have a slip resistant surface to help stabilisation. Best of all they’re lightweight and very portable – perfect for events, work, travel and being on the road. (Can you tell we love this ball!).


Here’s a selection of the key releases,  to get to all the major parts of your body.

TrP and Ball Release

If you’d like to get yourself one of these balls, the smaller MB1 or the very popular grid roller, pop into the clinic where we have the full range in stock.

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