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Spread the word, Pelvic Girdle Pain is treatable

Posted on 28th January 2019 by

The Pelvic Partnership has just launched a new campaign, the ‘Stickmum’ campaign, to raise awareness of pregnancy-related Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP).

Pelvic Partnership Chandlers Ford

What is PGP?

  • a condition which affects 1 in 5 pregnant women
  • pain and stiffness in the pelvic joints
  • asymmetry of movement, joint irritation and pain when walking, climbing stairs and turning over in bed
  • in some cases, long-term pain and dysfunction after giving birth which can persist for months or years without treatment

Can PGP be treated?

In short, yes! But treatments can often be poorly understood, with many people thinking that pelvic pain is just a ‘normal’ and acceptable part of pregnancy.

  • PGP can be treated with manual therapy
  • If you’re suffering with PGP you don’t even need a referral. You can just give us a call and book an appointment for an assessment and treatment of the pelvic joints and soft tissues by our specialist pelvic Physiotherapist, Kim.
  • Pain and function should improve after each treatment session

When can PGP be treated?

  • Early diagnosis and treatment can lead to full resolution or reduction in symptoms during pregnancy, so try and get help ASAP if you think you are staring to feel PGP
  • It is safe to treat at any stage during or after pregnancy, even if there is very severe pain
What to expect from treatment

If you think you’re suffering with PGP, please call 023 8025 3317 to book an appointment with our specialist Physiotherapist, Kim. We aim to be able to offer you an appointment within 24 – 48 hours.

Download some really useful information about the PGP and the benefits of treatment here.


The Pelvic Partnership campaign

Read More

The effects of pregnancy on the body

Pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy

Pelvic pain awareness month

#PGPistreatable #getamummoving



5 Tips for the Romsey 5 Mile Run 2019

Posted on 23rd January 2019 by

This Sunday is the Romsey 5 Mile Run of 2019. The Romsey 5 Mile Run is set within the grounds of The Broadlands Estate, Romsey, Hampshire, once the home of The Earl Romsey 5 Mile RunMountbatten of Burma. The surface is mainly tarmac with a short distance of smooth hardcore.  The course is 2.5 laps of the estate making it one of the flattest 5 mile races in the county and as such attracts athletes from further a field looking for a PB time.

5 miles is a tough distance. It’s uncommon and hides nicely between those big 10km races and your weekly 5km parkrun. It’s an underrated distance and hence often underestimated. It’s a brilliant training run and a very credible distance to take the opportunity to clock some good times. It’s not a plod but it’s far from sprinting – it’s the sweet spot of speed and endurance. So just because it’s shorter doesn’t mean you can get away with no training! So we have put together 5 tips in time for the Romsey 5 miles!

  1. The best way to tackle such a peculiar distance is to mix up your training. Try a variety of different sessions which help to train different aspects of your fitness. Interval training will help with speed, long runs will ensure you have the stamina, whilst gym/resistive training to get the power your legs need to drive through those last kilometres. Fartlek training is also great to get a better understanding of your pace – timing that sprint finish and camera composure is invaluable!
  2. The shorter the distance you are competing, the more important it is that you warm up thoroughly. For 5 miles, it’s an essential. A good warm up should be about half an hour in total. You should consider starting to warm up about an hour before the race begins. This may seem a bit keen, but trust me – when you take into account the time taken striping down to shorts/vest, getting that last toilet break in and then the minutes taken just standing around at the start line, that hour will fly by. Get running for at least 10 minutes. During the warm up incorporate dynamic stretches– high knees, heel flicks, side strides, ring the bell, straight legged march – remember those from secondary school P.E? – well turns out they are useful after all! They get the muscles working more effectively and ready to go – reducing your risk of injury considerably. Read more about warming up for running here.
  3. But the preparation doesn’t just start at the warm up! If you have event looming and you’re already starting to get some aches and niggles, invest in a course of Sports Massage. Sports Massage will keep those niggles from developing into full blown injuries, supporting you through your training, getting you to race day in one piece!
  4. Lungs collapsing, knees about to give way and the body demands food, baths or just bed! But you’ll save yourself a lot of trouble with a good cool down – you’ll thank yourself if you can motivate yourself for a 10 minute plod! This will flush the lactic and waste products from the muscles by introducing fresh oxygenated blood. If there is a masseur on hand, make the most of them – they’ll do most of that more you! Also do a mix of dynamic and static stretches to relax the muscles.
  5. Just because the event has come and gone, doesn’t mean you switch off. That warm down will have helped avoid those stiff and achy legs, but by having a follow up recovery Sports Massage, you’ll cleanse your body from that event, and focus on the next one! You can book your massage online here 24/7. Good Luck to all doing the Romsey 5 Miles, especially those doubling up and doing the Hendy Eastleigh 10K too! Look forward to seeing familiar faces!

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It’s all about LOAD!

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

We appreciate you guys don’t want to get bogged down with the science, research or evidence behind the ways we help you – you just want us to help you recover from your injury, quickly!

But to us, the science and latest evidence is important, it helps us get the best results for you in the best way. So we always get a little bit excited when we see or read what the latest evidence is saying (especially when it’s presented in a fab infographic!).

This infographic, that was shared by Trust me, I’m a Physiotherapist, really highlights the power of loading.

Load & Strength Chandlers Ford

LOADING is currently a bit of a ‘buzz’ word in the physio & rehab circles. And with good reason. In recovery terms, rest isn’t often the best way forwards but progressive loading is! As the infographic above summarises, many of the body’s tissues will get stronger if they are subject to loading.

So, what exactly is loading?

The definition of load is………..

A weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something.

In exercise or rehab terms, loading means working with some weight or resistance to place greater demands on your body. So, that can be using just your body weight, some light resistance, like bands or machines, or using weights. So, running is loading – you’re loading all the structures in your legs (bones, muscles, joints, tendons & ligaments) through the repeated pressure between your foot striking the surface with every step. A press up loads the structures around your shoulder and arms, just as a squat loads your hips and knees. Now, if you add holding a weight whilst you squat, you are increasing the load.

What is important is that loading is gradually progressed. You don’t want to demand too much of your body too quickly (or too often), especially if you’re recovering from an injury, as this will be counterproductive. It’s a careful balance.

The ultimate result of all this loading is that you will have a stronger and more resilient body. It will cope better with the demands placed upon it, making you less prone to picking up injuries, helping you enjoy an active lifestyle and potentially preventing longterm conditions such as osteoporosis.

Put simply, your tissues will adapt to the demands you place upon them.

If you think you would benefit from some guidance on realising the benefits of loading, then do get in touch. Our fully equipped Strong Room and experienced team offer that unique combination of being able to guide you on progressive loading within your own limits. We consider your ‘whole picture’ – where you are now, any injuries or conditions that affect you, what you love (or would love) to do and most importantly where you want to be. We then use our knowledge, experience and skills to tailor a programme just for you and support you as much or as little as you need.

Give us a call or drop us an email to find out more.


Patient Stories #1 How Shockwave got Mike back running

Posted on 18th January 2019 by

Today, local runner, Personal Trainer & Running Coach, Mike, shares with us his story of recovery from Plantar Fasciitis.

As a bit of a brief background, Mike developed plantar fasciitis in both of his feet, after a period of increasing his running mileage 14 months ago. The painful condition affected him so much that he had to stop doing what he loved – run. When he finally came to see us, he hadn’t run for over a year. Having tried many other treatments and ways to tackle his plantar fasciitis, Mike wanted to give Shockwave Therapy a go. Both he and we are delighted with the progress that he made and within 6 weeks or so, he was back competing in his first 10k in over a year, pain free!

We asked Mike to share more about his experience and how Shockwave Therapy helped him finally recover from his plantar fasciitis.

Tell us more about your injury Mike?

In October 2017 I started to increase my weekly running miles as part of my winter training. I was focused on attending the World Masters Athletics championships in 2018. My weekly volume was 45 miles per week and I was running both cross-country and half marathon events. Since the summer of 2017 I had been experiencing post training calf tightness and this increasingly manifested in painful heels in the morning when getting up or after period of rest.

For some time I didn’t really address this as was still managing to train but by December 2017 the pain in the morning and calf tightness when running was so much that I had to stop running completely. 

From seeing a physio I was told I was experiencing bilateral (both feet) plantar fasciitis.

How was it affecting your life? 

Unable to train to my previous volume and intensity for months, it became clear I would not be able to compete at the World Master Championships in the Summer of 2018. In fact, the pain was so much that I didn’t compete in any races throughout 2018. This was very difficult to accept and greatly affected my mental wellbeing. Running is important to me for fitness but always plays a huge part of in my wellbeing. I am also a running coach and personal trainer and was increasingly unable to run with clients and the athletes I train. The injury was also therefore affecting my professional career.

What treatment had you tried before Shockwave? 

During the first months of the symptoms I had regular sports massage and also used a foam roller at home. I had sessions of acupuncture and dry needling. Whilst all these treatments relieved symptoms in the immediate term, none seemed to ultimately reduce the discomfort once I increased my training volume.

What did the Shockwave treatment feel like?

ECSWT Plantar Fasciitis

Shockwave treatment was certainly not as uncomfortable as I had feared! I guess it is like deep tissue massage. There were times when this can be uncomfortable, but only for short periods, and has a similar ‘good pain’ feel to it. 

There were post treatment symptoms where my heels would feel sore for a number of days after but this soon reduced. Gradually through the course of treatment it was clear the symptoms of plantar fasciitis were reducing the consequently the discomfort of the actual treatment also reduced. 

Where are you now with your injury?

Plantar Fasciitis Shockwave Treatment

I have finished the treatment and I am now starting to increase my running volume again. Last week I competed in the Stubbington 10k. The first time I have been able to compete in a race since October 2017! Whilst no where near my previous form I was delighted to run the 10k in 40:51 which is very encouraging for 2019. 

I now need to be sensible with small weekly increases of mileage and continue with strengthening exercises to my feet and calves and regular stretching and sports massage. But overall I am so pleased with the treatment and the effect it is had on my symptoms. 

Do you have any advice for anyone considering Shockwave?

Do your own background reading to make sure you understand what the treatment does. Try to address your symptoms through other options first. But if you have a chronic and stubborn injury, Shockwave treatment should certainly be a serious option to explore. The goPhysio team will explain the whole process, and potential outcomes. 


The entire team at goPhysio is highly professional and genuinely cares and is committed to getting you pain free and getting you back to doing what you love. I would encourage anyone to get in touch for a consultation and know you will be in first class hands.shockwave

Mike Chambers
Hampshire Shockwave Therapy

Hampshire Shockwave Therapy is brought to you by goPhysio. It is a highly effective treatment for helping long standing, stubborn conditions that have failed respond to other treatments. These include plantar fasciitis, achilles tendinopathy, tennis and golfers elbow and patella tendinopathy, amongst others. It is a genuine and successful alternative to steroid injections and even surgery for many conditions.

If your life is being affected by a long term injury and you’d like to find out whether Shockwave Therapy could help you like it did Mike, complete this brief questionnaire and we’ll be in touch. You can also give us a call on 023 8025 3317 to find out more.



goPhysio become local ‘Beauty Spot’

Posted on 11th January 2019 by

“Our mission is straightforward: to provide essential supplies to people who can’t afford them, via partner charities across the UK. Beauty Banks isn’t a physical “bank” as such; instead we supply local organisations who may not have our contacts.”

Beauty Banks is a non-profit organisation set up by the brilliant Sali Hughes (beauty columnist & writer) and Jo Jones (a PR & beauty director). They focus on collecting basic toiletries and cosmetic products for people living in serious poverty who cannot afford the items we take for granted on a daily basis – things like toothpaste, shampoo and deodorant. 

Beauty Bank

Here’s where you can help………. If you have unwanted and unused beauty gifts, toiletries or general hygiene products then please do get in touch and donate! If you don’t have anything spare, as an alternative to monetary donations, people have been adding items to their weekly shop to help those in need. All donations received will be delivered to a charity within Hampshire, supporting the local communities and will be gratefully received. 

Beauty Banks accept sanitary products, disposable razors, shampoo, shaving foam, shower gel, combs, hair bands, face wipes, hand gel, sunscreen, baby lotion, soap, face wash, spot cream, deodorant, moisturiser, Band-Aids, conditioner, lacquer, lotion, lipstick, gift sets and anything in an unused hygienic condition. 


goPhysio are delighted to be part of this amazing initiative and have become a local ‘beauty spot’. We are collecting your donations at our clinic – 11 Bournemouth Rd, Chandler’s Ford, Eastleigh SO53 3DA. Deliveries can be made to us directly during our opening hours. 

Your help is invaluable so THANK YOU! 

You can follow the organisation direct on social media – @thebeautybanks or contact Jessica Eades who is dealing with all Hampshire donations and logistics. 

Beauty Bank Hampshire

Email: contact@stylingbyjessicaeades.co.uk

Tel: 07860 638 735

@eadesjessica 

A little more coverage and information… 

Sali Hughes on Beauty Bank

People living in poverty need toiletries and beauty products. Here’s how to help.

Beauty Banks: The toiletry equivalent to food banks takes off



Body Worlds – Body Amazing

Posted on 9th January 2019 by

It’s not everyone’s idea of a New Year day outing, but if you’re a family of Physio’s & Personal Trainers, it fit’s the bill!

Body Worlds London

We love having a little day trip planned for New Year’s day. Having visited the Body World’s exhibition when it first came to the UK as a newly qualified Physio (many, many years ago), and seeing it had returned to London, we decided to make this our 1st event of 2019!

The philosophy behind Body Worlds is preventative healthcare. The Body Worlds exhibitions were conceived to educate the public about the inner workings of the human body and to show the effects of healthy and unhealthy lifestyles. The exhibitions are aimed to inspire visitors to become aware of the fragility of their bodies and to recognise the anatomical individual beauty inside each of us. And it certainly achieved this for us! With our group age ranging from 4 to 70, the exhibition kept us all engaged for a good few hours.

It was very interesting and made me aware of how much power you have over your body. It showed me that smoking can decrease your life by many years, as it makes your lungs black.

Annabelle, Aged 10

What were the highlights, messages & takeaways?

  • The human body is undeniably AMAZING! Seeing it stripped back (literally) to all it’s amazing components was fascinating.
  • Stress plays a huge part in health and wellbeing. We all realised that stress features highly in our lives now on a daily basis and the exhibition reminded us to take stock and slow down.
  • The effects of obesity on our health and seeing it in 3D, and how diet and exercise are so crucial, was frightening. You are what you eat has never had so much power!
  • The ITB is huge and there is definitely no way you can stretch it!

People are like bicycles. They can keep their balance only as long as they keep moving.

Albert Einstein

The Einstein quote really resonated – at goPhysio we’re all about movement! And life is all about being balanced. A healthy mind and body, supported by eating well, sleeping well, relaxing well and moving well, as we wrote about in a previous blog, are so important. None can be neglected and we are privileged to work with so many people and support them with their movement as a crucial part of this healthy jigsaw.

And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.

Abraham Lincoln
Body Worlds Nervous System
The Nervous System (can you spot the Sciatic nerve?)
The exhibition ended with this fantastic TED Talk from survivor of the Hudson River plane crash in 2009. 3 Things I Learned While My Plane Crashed. Well worth a watch.


For more information and tickets to the London exhibition, take a look here.


Pilates with Resistance Band

Posted on 1st January 2019 by

There’s a very simple piece of kit you may have seen or used in one of our Pilates classes, the humble resistance band! It doesn’t look much but it’s a great way to challenge your Pilates exercises. It comes in a range of different strengths, depending on how much you’d like to challenge yourself!

We’ve put together some of our favourite Pilates exercises for doing with the resistance band.

#1 Roll Up

  1. Starting position: Sitting upright. Neutral lumbo-pelvic position. Legs extended in front. Legs extended in front, hips adducted, knees slightly flexed (to allow neutral spine position), ankles in mid ROM dorsiflexion. Theraband looped around the feet and held in each hand. Upper spine and back of the neck lengthened.
  2. Action: Inhale to prepare. Exhale, roll off the back of the sitting bones in a small range of motion to round the pelvis and the lumbar spine. The ribcage and upper quadrant should remain still. Keep the head and neck upright. Inhale, roll forwards onto the top of the sitting bones to resume the neutral spine starting position. The ribcage and upper quadrant should remain still. Keep the head and neck upright.
  3. Tips: Keep the feet on the floor. Do not poke the chin forward.

#2 One Leg Circle

  1. Starting position: On your back, knees bent, feet flat. Neutral lumbo-pelvic position. Resistance band looped around one foot. Hands holding the band. Back of the neck long.
  2. Action: Inhale to prepare. Exhale, float the left leg into the tabletop position then extend the knee. Inhale and hold the extended knee position keeping the band feeling taut. Exhale, circle outwards and downwards in a clockwise direction in a small, controlled range of motion. Inhale, complete the circle on this leg by circling inwards and upwards to finish where the circle started.
  3. Repeat circling this leg 6 – 8 times in the clockwise direction then exhale as you lower this leg to resume the neutral spine starting position.
  4. Repeat 6- 8 clockwise circles on right leg then repeat on 6 – 8 counter-clockwise circles on the left leg. Repeat 6 – 8 anti-clockwise circles on the right leg.
  5. Tips: Keep the pelvis still while doing the leg circles. Keep the knee facing the same direction through the movement to avoid hip rotation.
  6. If you are confused with the breathing, you can start doing the movement without focusing on the breathing..

#3 Shoulder Bridge

  1. Starting Position: The rest position. Neutral lumbo-pelvic position. Resistance band looped around both knees with the band feeling taut. Arms resting long beside the body. Back of the neck long.
  2. Action:
  3. Inhale to prepare. Exhale, gently roll the lower back into mat, lift the tailbone upwards towards the ceiling and continue to peel your spine off the mat, bone by bone until you are resting on your shoulder blades. Maintain tautness in the band.
  4. Inhale and hold the shoulder bridge position. Move your knees out towards the resistance of the band and back in again 6 – 8 times while maintaining the shoulder bridge position and normal breathing.
  5. Inhale and hold the shoulder bridge position. Exhale, and lower the shoulder bridge by drawing the breastbone downwards towards the mat, continue to peel your spine back onto the mat bone by bone until the tailbone connects the mat and the spine returns to neutral.
  6. Tips: Do not extend the thoracic spine (the shoulders must never be higher than the hips). Do not put your weight through your shoulder and neck but rather on your shoulders. Use segmental motion for the lift and lowering, peeling your spinal vertebrae 1 at a time like we do in class.

#4 Lower & Lift

  1. Starting Position: Lie on your side with your shoulders and hips stacked and a band between your legs, just above the ankles. Underneath arm outstretched in alignment with the trunk. Ensure your back is in neutral and your centre is engaged.
  2. Action: Inhale to prepare. Exhale, reach your top leg away from your body and then lift it upwards on an arc. Simultaneously point this ankle.
  3. Inhale, lower this leg to the starting position. Simultaneously flex this ankle.
  4. Tips: Imagine balancing a cup of tea on your top hip and top shoulder to avoid moving these areas. Imagine that the inner aspect of the top leg is polishing a glass tabletop to help keep this leg lifted at hip height. Imagine that the front hand is resting on a cream cake to avoid heavy pressure through this hand.

#5 Side Kick Press

  1. Starting position: Side lying. Underneath arm outstretched in alignment with the trunk with your head resting on this arm. Hips bent to approx. 45° and knees bent to approx. 90°. Shoulders and hips stacked. Resistance band to be looped round 1 foot and held in opposite hand.
  2. Action: Inhale to prepare. Exhale, lift the uppermost leg to bring the knee and ankle to hip height. Then extend the uppermost hip and the knee as far as control can be maintained. Inhale, flex the uppermost leg to the starting position.
  3. Tips: Keep the pelvis still while doing the leg movement.

#6 Clam

  1. Starting position: Side lying. Underneath arm outstretched in alignment with the trunk. Head resting on the underneath arm. Hips bent up to approx. 45° and knees bent up to approx. 90°. Resistance band looped around the knees. Shoulders and hips stacked one on top of the other. Top hand resting on the floor.
  2. Action: Inhale to prepare. Exhale, lift the top knee upwards, keeping the feet together. Inhale, lower the top knee onto the bottom leg.
  3. Tips: Keep the pelvis still while opening the leg.

You can pick up resistance band from goPhysio in Chandlers Ford for £5 a length. Ask your instructor what colour they’d recommend you use, depending on your level and how much of a challenge you need.

If you attend our Pilates classes and would like advice or guidance on any of this exercises, please ask your Instructor, who’d be more than happy to help!

goPhysio strongly recommends that you consult with your doctor before beginning any exercise program. You should understand that when participating in any exercise or exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. If you are in any doubt, please seek professional advice.



Top tips on how to get the most out of your Pilates classes

Posted on 1st January 2019 by

A lot of thought, care and preparation goes into our Pilates classes at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford. We want to provide classes that will help you not only physically, but give you time to focus on yourself and is something to look forward to and enjoy doing.

Pilates at goPhysio

There are a few things you can do to get the most from your classes too.

Pilates Instructor Francesca, shares her top tips! 

  1. Come prepared; Pilates socks at the ready, water bottle in hand!
  2. Leave all your worries and the stresses of the day at the door and turn your phone off so as to not be disturbed unnecessarily.
  3. Think of your Pilates as a whole hour to focus on yourself. Let’s face it, with the lifestyles we lead there is little opportunity for this normally. 
  4. Don’t worry about what other people are doing in your class. We will always give you different levels or variations of the exercises to challenge you and help you progress if you so wish. Don’t be concerned if you are doing a different exercise to someone else, we try to tailor the class to all of your needs. With our small classes, we are lucky enough to get to know you well, so know when you may need to modify an exercise, use an extra soft block or can’t get into a certain position and will help you accordingly. 
  5. Ask the instructor if you aren’t sure of something or you aren’t feeling the right muscle working. It may be that we can tweak the position you are in enabling you to complete the exercise with the correct technique 
  6. Why not try some pilates at home, especially if there is an exercise you are finding particularly challenging; ask your instructor to send you the exercises via email so you have an option to practice correctly at home or on holiday. 
  7. When making up a class why not try a different level to what you are used to, go back to basics or challenge yourself by going up a level. Just make sure you let the instructor know which class you are normally in. 
  8. Most of all enjoy the class and remember how far you have come from your first class to now.