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Personal Training For Your Pelvic Floor

Posted on 22nd Nov 2017 by

Many women who develop continence issues following childbirth are suffering in silence because of embarrassment over the condition.

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy and the Royal College of Midwives are launching a joint initiative to prevent and reduce incontinence among women following pregnancy and birth.

In this film you can learn from a patient, physio and midwife about how pelvic floor exercises can maintain muscle strength following pregnancy and birth.

In the video above you can hear from a patient, physio and midwife about how pelvic floor exercises can maintain muscle strength following pregnancy and birth

One of the less obvious consequences of pregnancy and birth is the impact it can have on your pelvic floor muscles.

Throughout pregnancy, your baby is supported in the pelvis by your pelvic floor muscles. During delivery, the same muscles become very stretched, which can then cause many common pelvic floor problems including loss of bladder and/or bowel control, pelvic organ prolapse and reduced sensation or satisfaction during sex.

Exercising the pelvic floor muscles during and after pregnancy can help to protect you from these problems, both in the short and long term.

And the good news is that pelvic floor muscle exercises are easy to perform and can be done anywhere.

Pelvic Floor Exercises

Pelvic Floor physio

Read More

Pregnancy related incontinence

goMummy – Post Natal Check Up

Pregnancy Pilates

 


Why ‘Massage’ should be a regular entry in your diary!

Posted on 20th Nov 2017 by

Sports Massage Chandlers FordThe word Massage can conjure up lots of different thoughts – from a soft, gentle, candle lit, relaxing experience to a quick ‘rub down’ at the side of a muddy pitch!

There are certainly lots of different types and styles of massage; deep tissue, aromatherapy, Sweedish, hot stone………..whatever your preference, the overall aim of massage is to spend some time focused on you, away from every day stresses, helping you feel refreshed, physically relaxed and rejuvenated!

Life can be pretty hectic and more often than not, there is another priority that rises above getting a massage. But, before you prioritise everyone and everything else, let’s explore the benefits that massage can bring you!

Massage is a great way to promote your physical and mental well-being.

Here are our Top 5 Benefits of Massage

  1. Massage Helps Relaxation – This is one of the most immediate and noticeable effects of massage. Massage helps with the release of endorphins, the body’s natural chemicals that produce feelings of calm and well-being. It can also help reduce levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, adrenaline and nor-adrenaline. The impact of this on our general health, wellbeing and longevity can be massive.
  2. Massage Reduces Stress – Stress appears in everyone’s life to some extent. It isn’t always a negative thing, it’s a natural response to help us get through life. However, there are times that stress can become too much or overwhelming and it’s good to have strategies to both help us reduce the feeling of stress and also manage stress day to day. Massage is a fantastic way to both ease your feelings of stress and also manage stress long term. It enforces you to take time out, chill for an hour and will physically help you cope by easing any stress induced tension your muscles are holding.
  3. Massage Helps You Sleep Well – The importance of the quality of our sleep and it’s impact on our life is becoming increasingly recognised. Sleep is an ultimate way to recover and having a massage can undoubtedly help improve your quality of sleep.
  4. Massage Helps Recovery – Physically, massage is a key tool you can use to help not only tour mental but also physical recovery. If you’re training for an event, taken part in a race or competition or just exercise regularly, your body needs recovery to help it perform. The physical effects of a massage can help encourage and promote recovery and ward off injuries. Regular massages part of a training programme is a great investment as it can play a key part in helping prevent injuries and optimising your physical performance.
  5. Massage Improves Circulation – The manual techniques that are used by your massage therapist, will physically encourage circulation by moving blood through your tissues which can help flush the lactic acid through your muscles. It will also help with circulation of lymph fluid which carries metabolic waste any from muscles and internal organs. Enhancing your circulation will help promote healing as oxygen rich blood is circulated to damaged, tense muscles.

How often should I get a massage?

There’s no doubt that having a massage is good for our health and well-being. Whether you’re busy Mum, work at a desk most of the day, training for a marathon or spends hours commuting, a massage will help you feel great!

We often get asked how often people should have a massage. The frequency of a massage comes down to many factors. If you’re training intensely for a physical event, a weekly massage is ideal. If you build up tension in your neck and shoulders over time, once a month may be enough. Generally, once a fortnight is great – as it helps keep top of those stresses and strains, without them building up and becoming a problem.

Whatever works for you, if you can set aside time for a regular massage your body and mind will thank you for it!

What type of massage do you do at goPhysio?

At goPhysio, we practice Sports and Remedial Massage. This is a ‘clinically’ based massage, that involves working on deep tissues to promote recovery and ease tension. Your Therapist will always ask you a series of questions before they start, so they can tailor the experience to your exact needs and the areas you want to focus on. Appointments are available 6 days a week, as early as 8am and as late as 8pm. You can book appointments online here or give us a call on 023 8025 3317. We often have same day appointments available!

So, if you’d like to experience the benefits of regular massage, book your appointment today!

*Special Offer* Receive a 60 minute massage for the price of a 30 minute massage throughout November.

Just quote ’60 for 30′.


Universal Children’s Day

Posted on 20th Nov 2017 by

Established by the United Nations in 1954, the 20th November is Universal Children’s Day; a time to celebrate the future generation and promote well-being among children.

Here at goPhysio we remember that children aren’t just mini-adults but have a completely different physiology (let alone psychology!) to adults. This means they will experience different injuries to adults and will need different rehabilitation strategies to get better. All our Physio’s and Sports Therapists have experience treating children and undergo child protection training.

One of the most common problems we are increasingly seeing in children is back and neck pain linked to inactivity and poor posture. As the evenings get darker playing outside is swapped for ipads and movies, meanwhile there’s an increasing pile of homework to be done at a computer as the new school term gets underway. This increase in sitting still, often in slouched positions can lead to aches and pains in the short term but also lead to poor habits as we get older.

If we can instil good habits in children when they are young we can ensure these issues don’t follow them into adulthood. With childhood obesity also on the rise the message to get active is more pertinent than ever.

Here’s our 5 top tips to prevent postural back and neck pain and get your children moving this autumn.

Limit IT time

It’s estimated that teenagers spend an average of 6.5hours a day in front of a screen. Whilst technology can be a great learning tool these sustained periods can have a detrimental effect on both mental and physical health. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends that we limit screen time to 2 hours a day. As a parent try to lead by example and set boundaries such as a technology free night or tech-free rooms in the house, particularly bedrooms and meal times.

Get set up

There are times when using a computer or laptop is necessary for homework and other tasks. Get a good set up at home by sitting at a proper table or desk in a straight-backed chair (not on the sofa!) and aim to get the screen to eye-level. This might mean using a laptop stand or placing the screen onto a thick book to make it higher. Remove other distractions and take a short break every 30-60minutes. Not only will this improve concentration, but it will allow time to stretch and move around so our muscles don’t get tired and achy from being in one position too long.

Try new activities

Allowing your children to experience new activities can be an important confidence booster. Not everyone is going to be great at school sports such as athletics and football, but the more opportunities children have the more likely they find a sport that suits them and that they are good at. Therefore, they will be far more likely to participate in regular exercise. The NHS recommends kids should be doing at least 60 minutes of exercise a day. Think outside the box – rock climbing, ice skating, martial arts, watersports…you never know what you could be good at until you try! NHS choices has a great search tool for activities in your local area.

Explore the outdoors

Autumn is a great time to wrap up warm and go and kick up some autumn leaves. We are lucky to live in an area with so much beautiful countryside with the New Forest, South Downs and Farley Mount on our doorstep so get outside and get exploring! You might even try building a den or tree house!

Make small changes

Getting more active often doesn’t need a radical change in lifestyle, instead start with small changes. For example, try walking or cycling to school at least once a week, or getting off the bus one or two stops earlier. Before you know it, you might be signing up for you first Park Run (5k) or Junior Park Run (2k), which happen in Southampton, Eastleigh and Winchester every Saturday morning.

All these small changes could make a big difference overall to your child’s health.


Cauda Equina Syndrome

Posted on 17th Nov 2017 by

As trained, healthcare professionals, an absolutely crucial part of the role we play in assessing and treating people who come to see us, is identifying when people need to be referred on for additional tests and care.

If we’re not happy with something you’re presenting with or want a second opinion, we make sure we point you in the right direction, armed with information to help you in the best possible way.

Thankfully, serious conditions are very rarely seen in the clinic, although they do sometimes occur. Our team are highly trained to spot any worrying signs or symptoms. One such condition, that we may pick up on when people come to us with back pain, is Cauda Equina Syndrome.

What is Cauda Equina Syndrome?

The spinal cord extends from the brain down through a canal inside the vertebral column. At each level of the spine nerves branch off from your spinal cord (nerve roots) and are responsible for sending signals to and from the muscles and other structures throughout your body. The spinal cord finishes just above your waist, below this is the group of nerves called the Cauda Equina. The nerves of the Cauda Equina supply the muscles that control the bladder, bowel and the legs. Cauda Equina Syndrome is the symptoms which occur when the nerves of the Cauda Equina are compressed.

What causes Cauda Equina Syndrome?

Numerous causes of Cauda Equina syndrome have been reported, the most common being, very large disc prolapse or spinal stenosis (a narrow spinal canal). Less common causes include tumour, infection, or trauma. Cauda Equina syndrome is rare but when it does occur it tends to be in adults of any age.

How is it diagnosed?

Initially the diagnosis of Cauda Equina Syndrome is made from the information that you tell the clinician who assesses you. The examination findings are useful in that they give an indication of how urgently the problem needs treatment.

Treatment

If Cauda Equina Syndrome is confirmed on the scan, urgent spinal surgery is indicated, to prevent permanent damage to the nerves which supply the bladder and bowel.

Symptoms

Cauda Equina Syndrome presents as one or a combination of the following symptoms. Most commonly these symptoms develop suddenly and may worsen rapidly, within hours or days. However, some people develop symptoms gradually.

  • Saddle Anaesthesia

    Saddle anaesthesia
    Saddle Anaesthesia
  • Loss of feeling between the legs
  • Numbness in or around the back passage and/or genitals
  • Inability to feel the toilet paper when wiping
  • Bladder disturbance
  • Inability to urinate (pass water)
  • Difficulty initiating urination (urinary hesitancy)
  • Loss of sensation when you pass urine
  • Inability to stop or control urination (incontinence)
  • Loss of the full bladder sensation
  • Bowel disturbance
  • Inability to stop a bowel movement (incontinence)
  • Constipation
  • Loss of sensation when passing a bowel motion.
  • Sexual problems
  • Inability to achieve an erection or ejaculate (Males)
  • Loss of sensation during intercourse

If you suddenly develop any of the above symptoms then it is strongly recommended that you contact your GP as an emergency or an accident and emergency department.


Self Care Week 2017

Posted on 12th Nov 2017 by

Self Care Week is an annual national awareness week that focuses on establishing support for self care across communities, families and Self Care Week 2017 generations.

More needs to be done to support people to better look after their own health. Empowering individuals to self care has many benefits for their short term and long term health and this is important since people are living longer.

Embracing Self Care for Life is about living well and being healthy. Being active, eating healthily and learning when to self treat common ailments are all ways to embrace self care.

Many long term conditions such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are avoidable. However, numbers are still increasing. It is important to embrace self care, making healthy life choices now in order to look after ourselves in the future.

There are some really simple changes you can make to help avoid getting a long term condition.

  • Move more! If going to the gym isn’t for you, try walking part of the way to work, taking the stairs or having a dance to your favourite songs! This is something at goPhysio we continually encourage and support – it’s the core of what we do!
  • Stop smoking! One of the best things you can do for your health is to stop smoking. Ask your local pharmacist about stop smoking services.
  • Sleep. A good night’s sleep is essential to good physical and mental health so don’t burn the candle at both ends, make sure you get at least 7 hours sleep a night!
  • Eat well. It is vitally important that we get the nutrients we need and avoid excessive amounts of salt, fat and sugar. Try swapping chocolate and crisps to nuts and fruit for healthy snack options. Ask your pharmacist for advice on managing your weight.
  • Relax. We have such busy lives that we sometimes forget to take time out to relax, but it is essential for our physical and mental wellbeing. Find time in the day to be still and quieten your mind. Consider mindfulness or yoga as these can be helpful.

During Self Care Week, and always, make time to think about the positive steps you can take to embrace Self Care for Life. Let’s make Self Care a life long habit.

When we see people at goPhysio, a huge part of our input is educating people about their injury and steps and changes they can make so that they are empowered to invest in themselves and have an active part to play in their recovery and future preventing of injury.

Read a recent blog we wrote on the principles of being well.

Be well goPhysio


Breaking the injury cycle: Calf Tear in a Runner

Posted on 3rd Nov 2017 by

We were recently asked some advice from a regular recreational runner. It’s a story that we hear a lot of here at goPhysio (not always calf related, but the same principles apply), so we thought it warranted a little blog post!

The runner in question was concerned, as they’d picked up a calf injury when out for a run a few weeks previously. Nothing major, but felt a bit of a tug on the calf when they had to move suddenly during the run. The calf was painful, so they did what they thought they should and rested for a week from running. The calf then felt fine, so they went back to running. Since then, the calf pain comes and goes. They don’t only feel it when they try and run but can feel it driving, going up & down stairs and first thing in the morning.

The dilemma is……….what is the best thing to do? Carry on running (because they love it and it they were progressing so well!)? Stop running (because it’s making the injury potentially worse)? Exercise? Ice? Heat? Strapping? New trainers? Taping? See their GP? Have a sports massage? Ask a friend? Use a foam roller????????? So many questions?

This is a really common story that we hear a lot in physio. A simple calf tear should take 3-6 weeks to repair itself, however its easy to get stuck in a cycle of tear, rest, repair, tear again, making the recovery much longer and much more frustrating.

How do we break this cycle?

Whilst rest is important it is not enough to adequately repair our damaged muscle to take the strain of running again, which is why it keeps being re-irritated. If we continue to do this we cause a lot of scar tissue to form in the healing muscle. Scar tissue is neither as strong nor as flexible as normal muscle fibres which make it easy to re-tear when stressed by anything more than day to day activities.

In the early stages of recovery from an injury, relative rest is important to help with healing. What that means is avoiding any activity which aggravates the injury, but trying to do alternative activities or modified activities so that you aren’t resting totally.

However, the important thing is to rehabilitate the calf muscle during the ‘rest’ period – gently stressing it with progressive strengthening exercises and stretches to regain its normal strength and elasticity. Ready to run again!

Physiotherapists are experts at guiding you through this process, making sure you are exercising at the optimal level for your stage of healing. They will make sure you are doing the right exercises (technique, loading, reps etc. all carefully worked out) and that you progress them at the right stage – all tailored to you individually and your own goals.

A programme for a minor calf tear for an ultra marathon runner would look very different to a programme for a severe tear in a Saturday morning Park Runner. There isn’t a one size fits all approach and although ‘Dr Google’ or Joe Bloggs at running club who also had a calf injury can be useful resources, relying on such information won’t always give the best long term outcome!

In addition to a specific exercise programme, Physio’s can also carry out a range of other treatments such as hands-on therapy, ultrasound and taping which can help to speed up your recovery. They an also advise on treatments you can do at home, such as foam rolling. A crucial part of your recovery is obviously returning to running at the right time. We know taking time out of running can be very frustrating, so we limit this as much as possible, guiding you with your return programme so you don’t do too much too soon and risk re-injury. If you have a specific event or race coming up, this is factored in.

So, if you love running and are worried about a calf injury, don’t hang about, book in to see an expert to guide you out of the injury cycle and back to running!

Here are two great simple exercises for a calf tear

Calf raise exercise Heel raises – standing on both feet, slowly rise up onto your tip toes then lower back to the ground. If you can manage 20 or more of these try doing it just on the injured leg, holding onto a support for a little balance, remember slow and controlled is key!


Calf stretch – stand in a long stride position with the injured Calf stretch exercise leg behind. Bend the front knee and gently press the back heel down towards the ground until you feel a stretch in your calf. Take it to where you feel a mild to moderate stretch (but not pain!) then hold for 30secs.


More information

Treatment of calf pain in runners

Top Pilates exercises for runners

Top tips for injured runners

Get your running back on track

How to warm up for running