Click & Book Online Now

Call us now: 023 8025 3317

Physiotherapist or Sports Therapist?

Posted on 29th September 2017 by

Being able to offer a range of services and solutions to your injury problems all under one roof, is The Chartered Society of physiotherapists something we’re very proud to offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford.

This means a range of professionals who are best placed to help you with your injury concerns. We have a great team on board here and we often get asked;

“Who’s there best person to see? A Physiotherapist or Sports Therapist?

The short answer is, that both professionals are highly trained and experienced to treat your injury. The types of injuries people come to see us for here at goPhysio are called musculoskeletal (MSK) problems. So those issues affecting bones, joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments etc. such as back pain, sports injuries, whiplash, overuse injuries and such. There are some key similarities and differences in their training and approach.

In this article we aim to explain more about these 2 professions, to help guide you to seeing the most appropriate person to get you back doing what you love.

Physio’s and Sports Therapists have both had to complete a degree or masters qualification at University, so are highly educated in assessing MSK problems and applying a wide range of treatments to effectively resolve your pain and injury. Both focus on restoring, maintaining and maximising movement alongside relieving the pain of your injury and optimising your quality of life.

Both Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists have the skills and knowledge to:

  • Assess and diagnose your MSK injury
  • Formulate and deliver customised and effective treatment and rehabilitation plans to optimise your recovery from injury
  • Use a variety of treatment techniques to relieve your pain and help resolve your injury
  • Educate and advise people on management of long term MSK conditions
  • Support you with getting active and staying fit and well
  • Get you back doing what you love, free from pain or injury
  • Help you improve physical performance
  • Prevent injury or recurring injuries

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy is a healthcare profession, regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy are both protected titles, so individuals have to have completed an approved degree or masters course and meet and maintain strict standards set out by the HCPC in order to use this title.

Physiotherapy helps restore movement and function when someone is affected by injury, illness or disability. Physiotherapists help people of all ages affected by injury, illness or disability through movement and exercise, manual therapy, education and advice. The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists

During their training, Physiotherapists will learn how to manage a variety of different conditions associated with different systems of the body and different client groups. This includes orthopaedics, neurology, cardiovascular, respiratory, elderly, children and women’s health. Once they are qualified, they may choose to specialise in any one of these areas and work in a variety of settings such as hospitals, schools, sports clubs, private clinics and industry. Subsequently, they have a very wide and varied knowledge base and experience.

Sports Therapy

Sports Therapists are experts in musculoskeletal disorders. Their degree course focuses on the musculoskeletal system and treating pain and injury throughs hands on treatments and rehabilitation.

Sports Therapy is an aspect of healthcare that is specifically concerned with the prevention of injury and the rehabilitation of the patient back to optimum levels of functional, occupational and sports specific fitness, regardless of age and ability. It utilises the principles of sport and exercise sciences incorporating physiological and pathological processes to prepare the participant for training, competition and where applicable, work. The Society of Sports Therapists 

Despite the name, Sports Therapists don’t just see people with sports injuries. At the end of the day, an injury is an injury, however you’ve suffered it. Whether you’ve sprained your ankle out shopping or playing football, a Sports Therapist is well equipped to help you.

In Summary

  • Both Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists are trained to a high level to expertly assess, diagnose and help with your injury recovery.
  • Physiotherapists have a broad based training, so if you have a more complex history or other medical conditions, that need to be considered, they may be the better person to see.
  • Sports Therapists will be well equipped to support your full return to sport, focusing very much on rehabilitation and high level exercise if this is your goal.

Both professions will have taken different paths after graduating, so you may find a Sports Therapist who’s taken a less ‘sporty’ path in their profession, just as you may find a Physio who’s specialised in sports. So, be guided by your needs and the individual experience of the clinicians available to see.

The important thing is, that your form a good relationship with your Clinician, you can communicate with them well and you feel the benefit from their treatment programme and plan.

If you’d like further advice who to see for your injury, then please do get in touch.

 

SaveSaveSaveSave


National Fitness Day 2017

Posted on 26th September 2017 by

National Fitness Day 2017 This year’s National Fitness Day is on Wednesday 27th September and promises to continue to encourage the nation to celebrate the fun of fitness and physical activity across the UK.

As part of National Fitness Day, UK Active will be running a social media campaign – #Fitness2Me

#Fitness2Me aims to celebrate what fitness means to people, promoting that keeping physically active means something different to us all.

UK Active want to make #Fitness2Me the biggest movement in breaking down the barriers that stop people being active, showing that fitness is for everyone!

They hope that by encouraging people from all walks of life, activity levels, and interests to share what fitness means to them, it will inspire others to live healthier and happier lives through being active.

So if it is getting fit, getting happy, playing with grandkids, or connecting with pets, whatever it means to you we want to hear about it!

  • Simply grab a piece of paper and scribble down what Fitness Means 2 You
  • Then take a photo or capture a video to share with us on social media
  • Don’t forget to add #Fitness2Me and #FitnessDay and tag us via @FitnessDayUK

A major issue that people face when trying to increase activity levels, is overcoming perceived or actual barriers.

Here are some suggestions for overcoming barriers to physical activity.

Suggestions for Overcoming Physical Activity Barriers
Lack of time Identify available time slots. Monitor your daily activities for one week. Identify at least three 30-minute time slots you could use for physical activity.
Add physical activity to your daily routine. For example, walk or ride your bike to work or shopping, organise school activities around physical activity, walk the dog, exercise while you watch TV, park farther away from your destination, etc.
Select activities requiring minimal time, such as walking, jogging, or stairclimbing.
Social influence Explain your interest in physical activity to friends and family. Ask them to support your efforts.
Invite friends and family members to exercise with you. Plan social activities involving exercise, like family walks or walk to a coffee shop with a friend.
Develop new friendships with physically active people. Join a group, such as a walking club.
Lack of energy Schedule physical activity for times in the day or week when you feel most energetic naturally.
Convince yourself that if you give it a chance, physical activity will increase your energy level; then, try it.
Lack of motivation Plan ahead. Make physical activity a regular part of your daily or weekly schedule and write it on your calendar.
Invite a friend to exercise with you on a regular basis and write it on both your calendars.
Join an exercise group or class.
Fear of injury Learn how to warm up and cool down to prevent injury.
Learn how to exercise appropriately considering your age, fitness level, skill level, and health status.
Make sure you get any injuries checked out, so you have confidence to exercise without fear. 
Lack of skill Select activities requiring no new skills, such as walking, climbing stairs, or jogging.
Take a class to develop new skills.
Lack of resources Select activities that require minimal facilities or equipment, such as walking, jogging, skipping, or free online classes.
Identify inexpensive, convenient resources available in your community Park Run, Eastleigh Borough Council Activities, Health walks etc. 
Weather conditions Develop a set of regular activities that are always available regardless of weather (indoor cycling, free online classes, indoor swimming,  stair climbing, skipping, dancing, yoga, etc.)
Travel Put a skipping rope in your suitcase and skip.
Walk the halls and climb the stairs in hotels.
Stay in places with swimming pools or exercise facilities.
Join a nationwide gym.
Visit the local shopping centre and walk for half an hour or more.
Bring your mp3 player your favorite aerobic exercise music.
Family obligations Trade babysitting time with a friend, neighbour, or family member who also has small children.
Exercise with the kids-go for a walk together, play tag or other running games, do an aerobic dance or exercise video for kids (there are several online) and exercise together. You can spend time together and still get your exercise.
True skipping, ride a stationary bicycle, or use other home gymnasium equipment while the kids are busy playing or sleeping.
Try to exercise when the kids are not around (e.g., during school hours or their nap time).
Retirement years Look upon your retirement as an opportunity to become more active instead of less. Spend more time gardening, walking the dog, and playing with your grandchildren. Children with short legs and grandparents with slower gaits are often great walking partners.
Learn a new skill you’ve always been interested in, such as ballroom dancing, line dancing, or swimming.
Now that you have the time, make regular physical activity a part of every day. Go for a walk every morning or every evening before dinner. Treat yourself to an exercycle and ride every day while reading a favorite book or magazine.

SaveSave


Good Luck for the Winchester Half Marathon

Posted on 21st September 2017 by

It’s so great to have so many fantastic running events in our local area. This weekend is the much anticipated Winchester Half. We have lots of patients, friends and family taking place in this local Hampshire event.

And who can guess what the main topic of discussion is in anticipation of this event?…….HILLS!

But don’t let that taint your excitement. Hill’s can be great and here’s a little reminder of some of the benefits of hills, courtesy of Rock Creek Runner.


benefits of hill running

So, when you’re taking on those hilly challenges on Sunday, keep these benefits in mind!

Best of luck to everyone taking part in the Winchester Half Marathon event, we look forward to hearing your marathon stories next week. And if you want to be prepared and book in your recovery massage for next week, don’t forget you can do this online 24/7. So if those hills have taken their toll on Sunday evening, you can book there and then!

SaveSave


Open Day Success!

Posted on 19th September 2017 by

We had a fantastic day on Saturday, as we welcomed so many people through our doors to experience many of the different services we have on offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford, meet our team and find out more about our lifesaving defibrillator.

Visitors on the day took part in Pilates classes, our Active Backs classes for people who want to gain confidence again exercising with back pain, Positive Steps classes for the later years of life and Yoga with Marianne.

We were also delighted to offer free sports massage taster sessions, free injury advice clinics with our Physiotherapists & Sports Therapists and carried out lots of computerised foot analyses.

Linda, a local community first responder, kindly offered some basic CPR training and dispelled many myths about using a public access defibrillator.

It was wonderful meeting so many local people. Thank you for your support!

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open DaygoPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

goPhysio Chandlers Ford Open Day

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave


Turning back the clock and putting youth back into my step!

Posted on 19th September 2017 by

I’ve been hearing about the wonderful shock absorbing, running gait enhancing, HOKA trainer’s on blogs. from friends and through industry experts, for some time now. After suggesting them to my patients over the last 6 month’s, and hearing great feedback from them too, I finally got round to replacing my old trainer’s with an new pair of HOKA’s.

Kevin, at Up and Running in Chandlers Ford, had explained to me how they were designed with only a 4mm rise from heel-to- toe, with a slight rocker shaped sole, to help with midfoot strike and smooth propulsion. I’d heard similar before and was yet to be convinced!

Well, wearing them last night for my first run I was pleasantly surprised! Immediately my trunk felt more upright, I was naturally and effortlessly mid-foot striking and felt more energetic coupled with comfortable shock absortion soles I literally felt 10 years younger. This is how running used to feel when i was 10kg lighter and 10 years younger!!

So thank you HOKA and Kevin at Up and Running for turning back time!

First impressions, fantastic. I’ll let you know how the fair over time.

Paul, Clinical Director at goPhysio

Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running Chandlers Ford Running


Be Well

Posted on 15th September 2017 by

Be well goPhysioMany of us reach a point where we no longer feel so ‘young’. We start to feel aches and pains, we start to gain weight more easily, exercising becomes more challenging and energy levels can be harder to maintain.

People can reach that point at different times, some whilst still young, some not until they are much older, some maybe never or when it’s almost too late and our body can’t cope anymore.

I watched the BBC’s How to stay young programme this week. In this series, Angela Rippon and Dr Chris van Tulleken team up with scientists to turn back the clock on a group of volunteers, showing what can be done to reverse the ageing process. Over the course of three months, the volunteers are put through a variety of tests and placed on a lifestyle plan to turn back the clock on ageing, but will it work? Can they reverse their body age?

The answer is, yes! 

And it really is quite simple. There are 4 basic pillars to keeping well……….

  • Eat well
  • Move well
  • Relax well
  • Sleep well

Easier said than done, but if you can follow those 4 pillars above most of the time, you’ll be giving yourself a fighting chance of living a long, healthy life!

Here at goPhysio, we help play a key part in the moving pillar. ‘Move well’ can mean both exercising regularly to optimise physical health but also dealing with pain and injury so you can keep moving. Research suggests that the more we move, the better. So it doesn’t have to be about hard core exercise (although high intensity exercise has many benefits), integrating moving regularly throughout the day is essential.

Quality of movement is also an important consideration. You can easily develop habits or weaknesses that affect your quality of movement. Over time your body can compensate and areas can start to complain – one of the reasons you can pick up injuries or feel pain.

As a team of movement experts, our Physiotherapists and Sports Therapists are well versed in making sure you can move your body well. That can mean assessing your movement to find out what may not be moving as it should, re-educating how you move to address any issues, utilising movement as a way of recovering from injury and teaching your body to move effectively and efficiently, through exercises such as Pilates.

If you need some help and guidance on how to move well, give us a call to book in and see one of our experts.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave


Get Cycling with Cycle to Work Day 2017

Posted on 12th September 2017 by

It’s Cycle to Work Day on September 13th. The aim is to get as many people to cycle to work as possible. The longer term plan is to get more Cycle to Work Day 2016people cycling to work on a regular basis. Currently, almost 750,000 people cycle to work regularly. By 2021 the target is to get over 1 million people to cycle to work regularly.

There are many benefits to cycling to work. Cycling to work is a great way to burn off calories incorporating some exercise into your daily routine. It helps improve circulation, strengthen muscles and improve aerobic fitness.

It will also save you money on fuel costs and parking. And you will be helping the environment at the same by reducing the production of carbon dioxide.

Why not dust down your bike and get out in the fresh air. Start off your day the best way, on your bike. Cycle to Work Day 2017!

#CycleToWorkDay

SaveSave


A Busy, Active Weekend Ahead?

Posted on 8th September 2017 by

There’s loads going on this weekend, although getting back into normal routine now the holidays have ended may have you feeling you just want to relax on the sofa!

Tomorrow is Southampton General Hospital’s Annual Open Day, always a fascinating event and in fact, attending this every year as a youngster was one of the things that inspired me to become a Physiotherapist. We wrote a short blog about last year’s event here.

We also have The Romsey Show this Saturday in Romsey, Hampshire. ‘Where town and country meet’, a lovely chance to get on your feet, take a browse around. You can really rack up the steps on days like this. So, particularly if you’re not used to being on your feet all day and if the ground is uneven or wet and slippy from the intermittent rain we’ve been having, make sure you wear appropriate footwear and take plenty of breaks.

On Sunday, Hampshire see’s the fantastic New Forest Marathon events. There are 7 race options for 2017; Full Marathon, Advertiser and Times Half Marathon, New Forest Health & Leisure 10k , ExxonMobil 5k, Junior 1k and 200m Race, SES Autoparts Team Challenge, Nordic Walk and Woodland Walk. So, even if running isn’t your thing, there is a challenge that may suit you whatever your age. Nearly all the New Forest Marathon Events are fully booked now, but entries for next year will open on September 10th.

Simply Health are aiming to get #MillionsMoving by launching their ‘Great Run Day’ on Sunday. This kicks off with the Great North Run on Sunday. Although this may be a bit further afield, they’re in the area in continuing their Great Run Series in October for the Great South Run, which I know many local runners are signed up for.

If you are taking part in the New Forest Marathon, have the Great South Run or Winchester Half Marathon coming up or any other running event, why not come in for a professional Sports Massage. A great adjunct to your training programme to help with recovery between runs or a perfect treat after an event to help ease post race soreness. We have appointments 6 days a week, including every evening and you can even book online!

Whatever your plans for the weekend,

New Forest Marathon 2017  Great Run Day


World Physical Therapy Day 2017

Posted on 8th September 2017 by

Today, 8th September is World Physical Therapy Day. The day is an opportunity for Physiotherapists from all over the world to raise awareness about the crucial contribution the profession makes to keeping people well, mobile and independent.

The overarching theme for World Physical Therapy Day each year is ‘Movement for Health’. This year, the message is “Physical activity for life”, highlighting the important role that physiotherapists play in healthy ageing.

There are well evidenced guidelines for the amount of recommended physical activity for adults aged 18–64. Physical activity includes leisure time physical activity (for example: walking, dancing, gardening, hiking, swimming), transportation (e.g. walking or cycling), occupational (i.e. work), household chores, play, games, sports or planned exercise, in the context of daily, family, and community activities.

In order to improve cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, bone health, reduce the risk of NCDs and depression:

  • Adults aged 18–64 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Aerobic activity should be performed in bouts of at least 10 minutes duration.
  • For additional health benefits, adults should increase their moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity to 300 minutes per week, or engage in 150 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity per week, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
  • Muscle-strengthening activities should be done involving major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week.

Why do Physiotherapists play such an important role in supporting physical activity?

We play a crucial role in both keeping and improving people’s activity levels. “If you’re injured or in pain, the first thing people tend to do is rest” says goPhysio’s Clinical Director, Paul Baker. “GP’s often use this as their first line of advice. But rest isn’t always the best way to recover from an injury. We aim to help people stay as active as they can whilst they recover – be it alternative activities or modifications.”

“People often get scared to move if they’re in pain, so we reassure people and give them the confidence that movement is OK. When this is done early on, it prevents so many potential secondary issues evolving.”

“We also help and encourage people to try things that they may not think possible, particularly the older section of patients we see.”

Our Positive Steps classes for example are specifically designed for over 60’s, so they can gain confidence exercising in a friendly, supportive environment. We also offer a range of Clinical Pilates classes, great for improving strength and balance. Everything we offer at goPhysio is led by clinical experts, so they are in the unique position of bering able to focus not only on fitness and wellbeing but also combining this with knowledge and expertise in injury and health conditions.Physical activity guide

 

If you’d like to improve your physical activities, but are limited by pain, injury or confidence, then please do get in touch to find out how we could help you.

#Worldptday

 


Migraine Awareness Week

Posted on 4th September 2017 by

This week is Migraine Awareness Week, a time to raise general awareness of migraine as a serious public health issue and to reduce the associated stigma. migraine awareness week

Migraine is the third most common disease in the world, with an estimated global prevalence of one in seven people. Despite being recognised as one of the most disabling lifetime conditions, awareness and understanding is low.

Headaches and migraines can have many different causes. You can read more about some of the common types on a previous blog. Physiotherapy techniques can be very effective at successfully relieving and preventing headaches and migraines. One such technique we use at goPhysio is acupuncture.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Acupuncture works as preventative method for treating headaches and migraines – it works to resolve the cause of the issue by addressing imbalances and then continues to maintain that equilibrium to prevent any further re-occurrence of migraines.

Migraines often have a systemic cause involving reduced or compromised blood supply to the brain – TCM Acupuncture aims to improve the blood supply and circulation to help reduce the symptoms of a migraine.

It can also help with the following:

  • Pain relief – by stimulating nerves located in the surrounding muscles, neuro-chemicals are released that alter how the brain processes pain signals.
  • Reducing inflammation – by promoting the release of vascular and immune system altering factors.
  • Regulating extra- and intra-cranial blood flow.
  • Reducing the degree of cortical spreading depression, which is an electrical wave in the brain common in migraines.
  • Affecting the serotonin levels within the brain, which can halt an acute migraine attack

Read more about the evidence and safety of using acupuncture to treat migraines.

At goPhysio, we will use an integrated approach to help you manage your migraines. We will look at all the factors involved and tend to use acupuncture as a part of your treatment programme, which may also include:

  • Exercises to address muscle strength, flexibility and stability
  • Education and advice to address any lifestyle factors or habits
  • Addressing any other areas that may be contributing to your problems, commonly neck, thoracic spine or shoulder regions

Read more

Tension headaches

Cervicogenic headaches

The prevalence of headaches

 

#letsbeatmigraine #migraineawarenessweek

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave