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New exercise class for back pain sufferers in Chandlers Ford

Posted on 17th May 2017 by

Back pain affects nearly everyone at some point in their life. After stress, back pain is the second most common reason for taking time off of work, with some 4 million working days lost through back pain every year. Unfortunately for some people, back pain can become a recurrent & persistent part of their life.

There isn’t always an obvious cause of back pain, and many factors such as poor posture, working conditions, driving and lifting can all contribute.

Research has shown though that staying physically active is the key to helping back pain. Recent guidelines from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommend that regular physical activity & exercise in combination with education can help people manage their low back pain.

It is based on these guidelines that here at goPhysio, we have developed a new educational & exercise course called Active Backs.

Paul Baker, goPhysio’s Clinical Director, says

“So many people we see are afraid to move when they have back pain. They are scared they are going to cause more damage. As long as anything serious has been ruled out, movement is the key to helping improve your back pain in the long term.”

“All the research agrees that by being educated how to manage your back pain and learning how to exercise correctly, you will be able to gain confidence in using your back correctly. This will help you not only reduce your pain but also prevent it coming back again.”

The programme is thought to be the first one of it’s kind in the area. Classes are run every Tuesday from 11.15am – 12.15pm.

Active Backs will include both an educational element, covering weekly topics such as posture, coping strategies and relaxation. It will also include a weekly exercise circuit to help strengthen and stretch your muscles and improve your fitness. Through coming to Active Backs we aim to help you achieve your goals.

The course will be run by one of our dedicated Clinicians and numbers are limited to six, to ensure that everyone receive the individual attention they require. It is going to be held in our new ‘Strong Room’. fully equipped with resistance training, weights, balls and mats, and equipment designed to help you get the most from exercising for your spine.

For details on how to book, please take a look here. All bookings are easily managed online and you can have maximum flexibility with bookings and even combine with some yoga classes.

Read More 

Latest NICE guideline for back pain & sciatica

10 things you need to know about your back

Help I’ve got back pain, what should I do?


 


UK businesses are failing health needs of their office-based staff

Posted on 16th May 2017 by

Workers appeal to bosses to take action that will help them lead healthier working lives

The vast majority of office-based workers are aware of the health dangers of spending hours on end seated at their desks, but management is failing to respond to their needs, according to a survey to mark On Your Feet Britain day on Friday April 28.

Less than a third of line managers were reportedly either aware of the health risks of sedentary behaviour at work but not bothered, or were simply unaware of the issue.

In contrast, close to 90% of employees believed they ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ should be more active at the workplace, while only 5% thought they had no need to increase activity during their working hours.

On Your Feet Britain, now in its third year, is a free event run by the Get Britain Standing campaign in association with Active Working, a community interest company. More than 2,500 businesses have signed up to On Your Feet Britain, encouraging millions of staff members to participate in a variety of fun and simple activities in their workplace to allow them to #sitless and #movemore.

Growing scientific evidence indicates that sitting for more than four hours each day (however active a Active working goPhysioperson you are outside the workplace) leads to multiple health risks (including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and mental health problems).

More than three-quarters of respondents to the survey, of 250 business organisations across the UK, wanted to see clear leadership, encouragement and better education on active working solutions, 38% believed a complete culture change was necessary, and 34% wanted access to adjustable desks.

Only 28% of companies were said to be ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged sitting, an encouraging 36% were ‘somewhat aware but keen to know more’, almost 22% were ‘somewhat aware but not that bothered’ and 13% were totally ignorant on the matter.

Almost 60% of co-workers questioned said they spend six or more hours a day seated during a typical office day and almost 90% spend upwards of five hours a day sitting down.

This despite more than 75% of office workers who replied to the survey confirming that they were ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged or excessive sitting. A further 20% said they were ‘somewhat aware’ of the dangers of the ‘sitting disease’ but wanted to know more. Fewer than 5% were either unaware or simply not that bothered.

Almost a third of line managers were reportedly either aware of the health risks of sedentary behaviour but not bothered or were simply unaware of the issue. Only 28% of companies were said to be ‘very aware’ of the health risks of prolonged sitting, an encouraging 36% were ‘somewhat aware but keen to know more’, almost 22% were ‘somewhat aware but not that bothered’ and 13% were totally ignorant on the matter.

In contrast, close to 90% of employees believed they ‘absolutely’ or ‘somewhat’ should be more active at the workplace, while only 5% thought they had no need to increase activity during their working hours.

The average UK office worker sits 10 hours each day, with almost 70% of sitting taking place at work and 73 % only leaving their desk for toilet or tea breaks. Studies indicate that ongoing inactive behaviour is a risk for ALL employees, however fit and active they are outside the workplace.

“Employees across the country need to start asking for more activity in the workplace. No employee should be expected to sit for excessive or prolonged periods, like battery hens” says Gavin Bradley, Founding Director of Active Working. “On Your Feet Day is the perfect way to start experiencing the wellness and productivity benefits of sitting less and moving more. We are thrilled to see so many companies getting involved and engaged. We are all becoming increasingly aware of the importance of breaking up and reducing sitting time.”

On Your Feet Britain is a day when workers are encouraged to give their health a boost, converting sitting time to standing time by taking some simple actions. For example:

  •   Stand during phone calls
  •   Stand and take a break from your computer every 30 minutes
  •   Use the stairs rather than the lift
  •   Have standing or walking meetings
  •   Eat your lunch away from your desk
  •   Walk to your colleague’s desk instead of phoning or emailing them
  •   Stand at the back of the room during presentations

About Get Britain Standing:

Get Britain Standing is a dynamic campaign (operated by Active Working CIC) to increase awareness and education of the dangers of sedentary working and prolonged sitting time. We’re part of a multi-national campaign to promote #SitLess #MoveMore.

Learn More

If you’d like to learn more about ‘Active Working’, come along to our free event on 5th July at 2.30pm. At this free seminar goPhysio’s Non-Clinical Director, Fiona, will share the latest findings and recommendations on being active in the workplace. With a focus on ‘Active Working’, Fiona will discuss the benefits, challenges and practicalities of changing workplace behaviours to encourage a healthier working life.

  • Find out more about the problem of sitting too much
  • Learn how you can be more active in the workplace
  • Learn more about why being active is so important to your health
  • Practical ideas to take to your workplace

Fiona will also be joined by one of goPhysio’s Physiotherapists, who will be on hand to answer any of your work or postural related issues, aches or pains. Book your free place here.

Read more

Active working tips – drink more water

Active working tips – desk exercises 

Active working tips – dress to impress

Looking after yourself working from home


 


Take Positive Steps As You Age

Posted on 15th May 2017 by

As the years inevitably pass by simple things can start to become a bit of a struggle. We know how Older People's Dayfrustrating it can be not being about to spring up out of bed in the morning, reaching down to tie your shoes, playing with your grandchildren or getting out to work in the garden. It’s tempting to let niggling aches and pains slow you down and to start taking it easy but avoiding exercise isn’t the answer. Saying goodbye to an active lifestyle is putting your physical health and mental well-being at risk.

It isn’t too late

You’re not past it, it’s never too late to start taking positive steps towards improving your health and fitness. You have the potential to improve your muscle strength, maintain bone density and improve your balance and this will in turn help prevent aches and pains, give you more energy and help you feel less vulnerable to falling in the future.

Positive Steps

As well as staying generally active, specific exercises can really help. With this in mind here at goPhysio we are launching a new exercise class, Positive Steps, specifically targeted at older men and ladies who are pro-active about taking care of their bodies and staying physically well.

Each week our class will start with a gentle warm up, followed by a series of exercises completed as a circuit. The exercises will focus on:

  • Aerobic exercise – to benefit your cardiovascular system and help manage your weight.
  • Strength training – to maintain muscle mass and improve posture and stability.
  • Weight bearing exercise – to maintain bone density and strength.
  • Gentle stretching – to help promote flexibility and joint range.

Each class will have a maximum of 6 participants and will be led by one of our Clinicians’s, so you’ll be exercising in a safe, friendly & supportive environment (no intimidating gyms or big classes!). We will be making us of our well equipped ‘Strong Room’, to get you exercising within your comfort zone.

There are 2 levels of class:

Fundamental level classes are held every Wednesday from 11.15am – 12.15pm. These classes are suitable for beginners or those less confident with exercsing.

Progressive level classes are held every Thursday from 10.30 – 11.30am. These classes are suitable for those who want more of a challenge!

You can buy class passes for all of our studio classes, including Positive Steps, online. A single class costs £12.50 (1 month expiry), 5 class pass £55 (2 month expiry) or 10 class pass £100 (3 month expiry). Class passes can be used for all our studio classes (with the exeption of Clinical Pilates), including Yoga and Active Backs, exercise classes to help people manage back pain positively. Take a look here for more information about booking studio classes. When you sign up for studio bookings, your first class is automatically free!

Read More 

Positive Steps Exercise Classes

The Importance of Lean Muscle Mass

Fall Proof – Exercises for Older People

Exercise Guide for People With MSK Conditions


 


Pelvic Pain Awareness Month

Posted on 12th May 2017 by

Pelvic pain Awareness MonthMay is International Pelvic pain Awareness Month, a time when various organisations work to raise public awareness of issues in the area of chronic pelvic pain.

One of the most common types of pelvic pain we see here at goPhysio, is pregnancy related pelvic girdle pain.

Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) is an umbrella term used to describe pain felt in the hip, back & pelvic area during pregnancy. It can affect 1 in 5 pregnancies, normally from the second trimester, but can start from very early on in pregnancy.

It used to be thought that it was caused by changes in the ligaments during pregnancy but latest research has found that this only plays a small part. It is thought now that the biomechanical changes that occur during pregnancy in your back and pelvis are the more likely cause.

PGP can be very mild or it can be seriously debilitating, interrupting sleep, causing problems walking, sitting and gong up and down stairs. It can have a major impact on your life and pregnancy. The earlier it is diagnosed and the earlier treatment is sought, the better.

Physiotherapy is key to helping Mums to be with PGP. A Physio will carry out a thorough assessment of your back and pelvis to find out exactly what is going on and where the problem is coming from. This will guide an appropriate treatment and management programme with the aim of easing the pain, stopping it worsening and helping you to cope and stay active. There are many treatments that a Physio can use. These include manual therapy, specific exercises and lots of advice. The sooner you seek expert advice if you think you may be suffering with PGP the better.

At goPhysio, we have a specialist Physio, Kim, who is trained in the diagnosis and treatment of PGP in pregnancy. We also offer specialist Pregnancy Pilates Classes that are run by a Physio. These small and supportive classes are a really pro-active way to help prevent PGP by optimising your physical health during pregnancy. If you’re suffering with PGP the exercises can offer much relief. Plus you’ve got on hand Physio for advice when you need it!

Once you’ve had your baby, the good news is that PGP often resolves quite quickly. If it doesn’t or you’re concerned about your recovery, you can book in for a goMummy Post Natal Check Up. This 1 hour session will help identify any issues and give you a positive action plan and tailored exercise programme to help ease and improve your pelvic issues.

If you’d like further information about PGP, the Pelvic Partnership is a great online resource.

If you are suffering with PGP, our specialist Physiotherapist, Kim, would be happy to chat to you to see whether she can help. Just give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

Read More 

goMummy Post Natal Check Up 

Pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy

Exercising during pregnancy

Should I plank pregnant?

Effects of pregnancy on the body

 

 


Happy Pilates Day!

Posted on 6th May 2017 by

Chandlers Ford Pilates DayIt’s Pilates Day today! A day for the Pilates community to unite in celebration of everything Joseph and Clara Pilates brought to the world.

Pilates Day spotlights the joy experienced through Pilates – in health, community and quality of life.

As our regular Saturday morning class begins in our studio, with 10 people starting their weekend with a full body exercise, we thought it would be a great opportunity to tell you a little more about the joy that is Pilates!

What Is Pilates, Anyway?

Pilates is a series of controlled movements designed to strengthen muscles – with an emphasis on the body’s core. It was developed by Joseph Pilates, a German of Greek ancestry who came to the United States before World War II. The popularity of his methods spread gradually, finally hitting the mainstream in the 1990s.

Pilates believed that the key to good fitness was to use precise, controlled movements using the body’s own weight as natural resistance (he later invented several machines for Pilates training). His exercises focus on breath control, concentration on the overall movements required and the proper alignment of the body. The meditation needed to do Pilates correctly represented his belief in the connection between physical and mental health.

There are a lot of similarities between Pilates and yoga. They share some movements, as well as the focus on breathing and control. However, their origins are very different.

Although both exercises can be performed on mats, Pilates isn’t a form of yoga. You need no other special equipment. Most Pilates exercises involve holding a body part in a particular position while you control your breathing. For example, you might lie on your side and raise your top leg several inches up. This exercises both the muscles that lift the leg, the muscles that stabilise the rest of the body and the muscles required for controlled breathing.

What is Clinical Pilates?

The classes we offer here at goPhysio are ‘Clinical Pilates’. This means that the Instructors are also clinical graduates, so Physiotherapists or Sports and Rehabilitation Therapists. They are all trained with the APPI method of Pilates.

The APPI PIlates Method is the creation of two Australian Physiotherapists, Glenn and Elisa Withers. The method is based on over 14 years of clinical practice in treating movement dysfunctions through their roles as world leading Physiotherapists and Pilates teachers. The Method encompasses three core areas of pain, pathology and function. Each Pilates movement
has been analysed based on these three core areas.

Pain is a chemical and as such alters the way certain muscles move and therefore can dictate the way these muscles need to be rehabilitated through the APPI Pilates Method.

Pathology is the term used to describe an injury and this has been analysed to dictate what movements will help a set pathology, and what movement might make a sert pathology worse. This forms the indications and contraindications of the APPI Method. Finally Function.

Function is the term used to describe how we do our everyday tasks.

APPI has analysed all of the Pilates movements for their ability to help us retrain a certain function. This means that the APPI Method is much more than just a way of toning a person physique, but is a research based, clinical application of improving the way a person moves and functions in their everyday life.

The APPI Pilates method has now been applied in areas as diverse as physiotherapy injury rehabilitation, paediatric rehabilitation, neurological rehabilitation, elite sports rehabilitation, elderly care, womens health and much more.

Our Classes

We run a range of Clinical Pilates classes here at goPhysio in our onsite studio. It’s a very welcoming and comfortable space and you’ll be supported and encouraged positively throughout.

  • Classes are run in 8 week blocks, costing £100 a block.
  • We run 17 classes a week – have a look at our latest timetable to find a class that might suit you.
  • Classes are small, there will be a maximum of 10 people per class.
  • You’ll find the classes are individually tailored and progressed to challenge you positively.
  • Read more about our Pilates classes here.

Read More

Pilates s Yoga

Centring, the building block of Pilates

How is rehabilitation Pilates different?

 


10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back

Posted on 4th May 2017 by

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) have today launched a great new campaign, ’10 Things You Need To Know About Your Back’.

Back pain research constantly gives new insights into previously held beliefs. Their new guide reflects these advances to give clear, simple advice on how to manage your pain and prevent future episodes.

Here’s the latest advice from the CSP:

  1. Your back is stronger than you may think Most people worldwide will experience back pain during their lifetime. It can be disabling and worrying but it is very common and rarely dangerous. The spine is a strong, stable structure and not easily damaged so in most instances it is a simple sprain or strain. In these cases – 98 per cent, according to research – people recover reasonably quickly, and many do so without treatment. Some people experience repeat episodes, which can be distressing, but again these are rarely dangerous.
  2. You rarely need a scan and it can do more harm than good
    This is because seeing perfectly normal changes to their spine can cause people to avoid the activities they should be doing to get better, such as exercise and movement in general. In very rare cases, there may be something more serious or underlying that requires medical advice. A scan may help with your diagnosis and symptoms to be aware of are at the bottom of this page. However, these account for just two per cent of cases so if your physio or GP does not send you for one, you should take it as a good sign that there is nothing concerning going on.
  3. Avoid bed rest, stay in work and gradually resume normal activities
    Scientific studies now indicate prolonged rest and avoidance of activity for people with low back pain actually leads to higher levels of pain, greater disability, poorer recovery and longer absence from work. In the first few days of a new episode of low back pain, avoiding aggravating activities may help to relive pain. However, staying as active as possible and returning to all usual activities gradually is actually important in aiding recovery – this includes staying in work where possible. While it is normal to move differently and more slowly in the first few days of having back pain, this altered movement can be unhealthy if continued in the long-term.
  4. You should not fear bending or lifting
    Bending and lifting are often portrayed as causes of back pain and while an injury can occur if something is picked up in an awkward or unaccustomed way, it’s most likely to just be a sprain or strain. The important thing is to practice and get your body used to carrying different loads and weights in a way we find comfortable and efficient. We all run differently, and it’s perfectly normal for us to find our own technique for lifting.
  5. Exercise and activity reduce and prevent back pain
    Exercise is shown to be very helpful for tackling back pain and is also the most effective strategy to prevent future episodes. Start slowly and build up both the amount and intensity of what you do and don’t worry if it’s sore to begin with – you won’t be damaging your back. No one type of exercise is proven to be more effective than others so just pick an exercise you enjoy, that you can afford to maintain in the long-term and that fits in with your daily schedule.
  6. Painkillers will not speed up your recovery
    There is no strong evidence on the benefits of painkillers and they do not speed up recovery. They should only be used in conjunction with other measures, such as exercise, and even then just as a short-term option as they can bring side effects. Exercise, which is safer and cheaper, is considered the preferred option.
  7. Surgery is rarely needed
    There are some uncommon back conditions where there is pressure on the nerves that supply the legs and the patient gets leg symptoms, such as pain, pins and needles or numbness. For these conditions, surgery can help the leg symptoms but it is important to understand that it is not always required. You also need to know that on average, the results for back surgery are no better in the medium and long term than non-surgical interventions, such as exercise. So a non-surgical option, which includes exercise and activity, should always come first.
  8. Get good quality sleep
    The importance of sleep in tackling back pain has become increasingly clear in recent years. This is because it reduces stress and improves your overall feeling of wellbeing, making you less susceptible to the triggers of pain in the first instance and helping you to cope when it does occur. Aim for 7.5-8 hours a night and try to aim for a regular routine, as far as possible. It is also very important to know that there is no best position or type of mattress – whatever feels most comfortable for you is best.
  9. You can have back pain without any damage or injury
    Many physical or psychological factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. Many factors can cause back pain and often a combination of these are involved. They could be– Physical factors, such as ‘protecting’ the back and avoiding movements, or a simple strain.
    – Psychological factors, including a fear of damage or not getting better, feeling down or being stressed.
    – More general health and lifestyle factors, like being tired and rundown, not getting enough good quality sleep, being overweight or not getting enough physical activity
    – Social triggers, such as difficult relationships at work or home, low job satisfaction or stressful life events, like a family death or illness. Crucially, it’s important to know that all pain is 100 per cent real and never ‘all in your head’, even when factors like stress or mood are involved. Each of the factors can turn up the volume on your pain and gaining a greater understanding of when that can happen puts you in a stronger position to recognise them and learn how to turn down the dial again.
  10. If it doesn’t clear up, seek help but don’t worry Physiotherapists provide expert advice, guidance and treatment for back pain. This is to help reduce your chances of future episodes, while improving your overall health and well-being.

At goPhysio, we offer a range of services to help you manage your back pain. 

Physiotherapy – If you want reassurance and help to become more confident with your back, physiotherapy can help. We can provide expert guidance and treatment for your back pain, tailored to you and your lifestyle. You can book an appointment online or give us a call on 023 8025 3317.

Clinical Pilates – Our specialist Pilates classes are a great way to keep you strong and active. They focus on building strength and flexibility and being able to move well. The classes are small and you will be under the close supervision of one of our Therapists at all times. We run 17 classes a week, including evenings and weekends, at a variety of levels, so it’s easy to find a class to suit you. Have a look at our latest timetable.

Yoga Classes – Our onsite Yoga classes are another great way to get you moving. We offer a range of different styles of yoga, including a gentle and restorative class for beginners to a more challenging Himalayan Hatha class. Bookings are made easily online, you can find out more about booking here.

Active Backs – Our Active Backs classes are supervised exercise classes, specially designed for people who have or have had back pain. The classes will help build your confidence in exercising and are combined with education and advice to empower you. These classes can be booked online.

Symptoms to be aware of:

These symptoms are very rare but you should contact a doctor if you experience any of them:

  • Difficulty passing urine or having the sensation to pass water that is not there
  • Numbness/tingling in your genitals or buttocks area
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control
  • Impaired sexual function, such as loss of sensation during intercourse
  • Loss of power in your legs
  • Feeling unwell with your back pain, such as a fever or significant sweating that wakes you from sleep

Read More:

Low back pain and sciatica, the latest NICE guidelines

Help, I’ve got back pain! What should I do?

Back Pain Myths

 

 


The ‘Magic’ 10,000 Steps A Day

Posted on 2nd May 2017 by

May is National Walking Month – a month to inspire you to get out on your feet every day

10,000 – the magic number of recommended steps we need to do every day! But why and where has this come from?

Originally, the magic ‘10,000 steps a day concept’ was created in Japan back in the 1960s. A team of Japanese researchers worked out that the average person took 3,000 – 5,000 steps per day. However, if they were to increase their steps to 10,000 steps per day, the potential result would be healthier, thinner people!

This number wasn’t based on medical research, however, since then much research has been carried out and this seems to be the figure the NHS, WHO and other organisations have promoted to be the number of steps we should try and take every day to help improve our health and reduce the risk of many diseases.

10,000 steps equates to approximately 5 miles

10,000 steps roughly equates to 30 minutes of ‘activity’

In the UK, the NHS has published guidelines for the minimum activity levels we should aim for every day to maintain & improve our health. This includes 30 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity 5 days a week – brisk walking can be an integral part of this.

What can 10,000 steps help with?

  • Improving overall health
  • Decreasing risk of heart disease
  • Reducing body fat % and helping weight loss
  • Decreasing risk of type II diabetes
  • Increasing energy levels
  • Reducing stress

What’s good about 10,000 is that 10,000 steps a day is a realistic goal that is achievable by people of all shapes, sizes and ages. It isn’t really a magic number but a good guideline that matches activity expectations to meet recommended activity levels.

You’d be surprised how much you probably overestimate how many steps a day you actually do. Most people living a ‘normally’ active day will only do between 3,000 – 5,000 steps! So, reaching 10,000 does require some lifestyle changes and it will take some extra effort.

Read More 

The ‘Active 10’ Campaign

Increasing activity with technology

Exercise and stress

#NationalWalkingMonth