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Using Your Tablet Without Pain

Posted on 30th August 2016 by

Tablets are now an integral part of many peoples daily lives. We work, read, shop, socialise and watch TV on them. They’ve got lighter and more portable, so are easy to use single handed and for long stretches of time. But with this great device comes some inherent problems.

Using a tablet can put immense strain on your back, neck, shoulders are arms, which can cause pain and overuse injuries.

  1. Avoid staying in 1 position for long periods of time, instead, adjust positions regularly and move around a bit so that you’re neck, shoulders, arms or hands aren’t having to hold a sustained position. It’s recommended to change position at least every 15 minutes.
  2. Hold your device at eye level which helps keep your neck in a neutral position. Always looking down at your tablet overstretches the back of your neck putting you at risk or neck pain and headaches.
  3. Limit how long you’re using your tablet for. Sounds obvious, but maybe use a timer or an app which helps you time your tablet use. Before you know it you can rack up hours on a tablet which can lead to considerable stress on your body.
  4. Use a stand and key pad to optimise the set up of your device. There are lots of accessories available to use with tablets. These can be used to help you set your device up more like a desktop, where you can use ergonomic principles to help minimise the risk to your body.
  5. Balance tablet use with other activities. If you’ve been on your tablet for a while, have a break and get up and do some stretches, rotating your shoulders and stretching your neck. If you can, go for a brisk walk.

Tablets and mobile devices are likely to continue to grow in popularity, so being mindful about their use and the effects on your body is crucial.


How might orthotics help me?

Posted on 30th August 2016 by

Orthotics are prescribed and worn for a variety of reasons.

The most common reasons are:

  • Arch and heel pain (Plantar Fasciitis)
  • Lower leg tendonitis (Achilles tendonitis and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction)
  • Shin splints
  • Knee pain, such as chondromalacia patellae, iliotibial band syndrome and runner’s knee
  • Leg length discrepancy
  • Low back pain

Orthotics work by improving foot efficiency, lower limb alignment, therefore reducing stress on the problem area resulting in pain relief.

Although some people adapt to orthotics very quickly, you should gradually adjust to them by wearing them for a few hours more each day. You should avoid using them for extended activity, including sports, until you feel fully comfortable.

They should be comfortable and used whenever you are doing the activity that would normally aggravate your condition. If you need orthotics, they can improve your overall comfort in your lower limbs and feet.


What are orthotics?

Posted on 30th August 2016 by

What are orthotics?

Orthotics, orthoses, shoe inserts, insoles……whatever name they are known by, are foot supports which fit in your shoes to help your feet move more efficiently. They are made of moulded pieces of rubber, leather, plastic, or other synthetic material that are inserted into a shoe. The aim of orthotics is to balance the foot in a neutral position and cushion the foot from too much pounding.

There are 2 types of orthoses, over the counter (OTC) orthotics and custom orthotics.

OTC or ‘Off the Shelf’ Orthotics

These give arch support to your foot. However, they are made in a generic shape and may not be suited to all. They may match some people’s arches, but for others the arch support may be too high, too low, or too far back or too far forward. OTC orthotics can work really well in some people, particularly if they already fit your foot well and any issues you may have are very minor. Prices of OTC orthotics can vary massively. Like most things, you get what you pay for. A very cheap orthotic will wear down very quickly and not provide support for any length of time, rendering it pointless! At goPhysio, if you’re not sure about whether orthotics are for you, we can often recommend OTC orthotics to give it a try. We also advise certain OTC orthotics for more minor issues. Our OTC orthotics are priced at around £65.

Custom Orthotics

These orthotics on the other hand are designed to specifically fit your feet and work more efficiently than OTC supports. They are designed specifically for an individual to balance the biomechanical inadequacies of your feet and legs. Here at goPhysio we use a Gaitscan system to measure and analyse how your foot works alongside the skill of your Physiotherapist. They will look at your feet and legs, analyse your movement, measure your foot position and put all this together in the bigger picture with your symptoms & lifestyle. This hug amount of information will enable them to prescribe the best custom orthotic for you and your lifestyle.

Here’s a little bit more about the custom made orthotics we prescribe.


Both types of inserts aim to improve foot efficiency, helping improve lower limb alignment and reduce stress on the problem area, resulting in pain relief. If you think you could benefit from orthotics or would just like a no obligation consultation to fine out more, we offer free foot assessments at our clinic in Chandlers Ford.

Just give us a call to book your free consultation on 023 8025 3317.


Is technology to blame for youth inactivity?

Posted on 26th August 2016 by

Research recently undertaken by UK Active has revealed that 9 out of 10 parents blame tech for youth inactivity.

Some Facts & Figures

  • Only half of seven-year-olds are meeting recommended physical activity guidelines of 60 minutes/day.
  • 75% of the 1039 parents interviewed agreed that it is more difficult for parents today to encourage children to become physically active than for previous generations.
  • 90% think technology is partly to blame.
  • Around 10% of children start primary school obese.
  • Only 9% of toddlers are meeting the chief medical officer’s activity guidelines.
  • Just 47% of those in the study think there are enough affordable opportunities for children to be active in their local area during school holidays

As a parent myself I understand the daily battle between over ‘screen time’. I think my kids are pretty active. They all walk to school, they take part in as much sport as possible in and out of school, we get out as a family and enjoy ‘active time’ and they have a garden to play in. My older 2 also share my slight FitBit Activity tracker obsession (and love a bit of healthy competition!) and I was shocked by how little ‘physical activity’ they actually do some days, despite doing all the above.

It has made me think about the very common scenario or typical day of being driven to school and dropped off at the gate, the limited PE provided in schools, wet break (so no opportunity to move around at playtime), being driven home again for an evening sat in front of the TV/playing computer games/doing homework.

It does take investment by parents nowadays to encourage and promote physical activity. But I don’t think it’s purely technology at blame. Many families have working parents who are stretched to their limits too and time resources are scarce. We rely on our cars far too much, so we’re less likely to have physical activity like walking, scooting or cycling built into our daily routine. School sport and PE (in my personal experience) can be pretty shocking! It’s certainly not inspiring for those who aren’t naturally drawn to sport. Organised sports can be expensive and time consuming and not always accessible for everyone. Plus, screen time is often the easy option – when we lead busy lives as working parents, a few hours of quiet time can be bliss!

However, as another report published last year by UK Active highlights, Generation Inactive, inactivity is a ticking tome bomb for the NHS. Just like we want the best for our children in terms of education, nutrition, happiness etc. helping them be physically active is fundamental. We (parents & schools) have to be teaching our children healthy habits for life.

Getting kids active

  • Walk whenever you can – if you find yourself with a bit of extra time, build walking into your day. Seize every opportunity!
  • Take advantage of nature – parks, country parks, beaches…they’re all free to access (apart from parking charges often!) and great for getting kids of all ages active.
  • Arrange to meet friends in an open space for some semi-organised sports, take a ball, rounders, cricket. Once they get going, the kids often take the lead and parents can catch up with others from the sidelines!
  • Take advantage of regular free organised activities in the area like SkyRide or Junior Parkrun. There are also many free sporting activities around in the school holidays. Locally for example, Arsenal Football Club run free coaching sessions in the holidays and in the summer Eastleigh run a great Park Sport scheme.
  • Encourage kids to try something new. Many sports clubs offer free tasters. Try something different or not necessarily mainstream, you may be surprised by what they enjoy.
  • Involve kids in household chores – hoovering, helping in the garden, washing the car. They’re all physical activities, it doesn’t have to be sport.
  • Set a good example. If they see you being active, enjoying investing in your body by walking or exercising, it will be seen as a positive lifestyle choice.

With the cost of games consoles and games these days, how can it not be possible to find a cheaper alternative to be active?!


How having acupuncture at goPhysio helped my neck pain & stiffness

Posted on 26th August 2016 by

My name is Martin and I’m a local sales manager, who commutes for a living & works a lot on the laptop. During a recent very busy period at work I suddenly developed a really stiff & painful neck. I was commuting hundreds of miles & nothing would ease the pain.

Then through the recommendation of a friend I went to see Paul at goPhysio. Paul used what he called ‘myofascial acupuncture’. This involved targeting the needles at the source of my pain. He also gave me confidence that it was OK to move my neck and some exercises to help get it moving again. Within only a couple of sessions the treatment relieved all my muscle spasm & pain, much to my delight. Without Paul’s treatment I think my neck would have got stiffer and stiffer and the pain would have got worse. He gave me lot’s of advice how to prevent it becoming a problem again too – thinking about my driving and working on my computer especially.

I don’t hesitate to recommend goPhysio now to anyone in pain!


Runner’s Knee (Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome)

Posted on 19th August 2016 by

Knee pain is one of the most common running injuries we see here at goPhysio. A regular injury is ‘runner’s knee’ or more technically Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS).

What is ‘Runner’s Knee’?

As you bend and straighten your knee, the knee cap (or patella) naturally moves up and down in a Runners knee groove in your thigh bone (or femur) . The knee cap is held in place by various muscles and tendons, helping it to move well. If any part of this isn’t quite working right it can affect the knee cap, particularly if you’re doing a repetitive movement such as running. Such problems around the knee cap can cause damage to cartilage, ligaments or fatty tissues near the knee cap and as a result cause pain and inflammation.

Pain often originates from the contact between the back of the knee cap and the thigh bone.

What does it feel like?

Pain is often felt during a run behind the knee cap or infant of the knee. It can be a dull achey pain or may be quite sharp and severe. Other symptoms include:

  • Pain during other activities, sports or even walking
  • Pain when squatting or going up or down stairs, down especially
  • Stiffness and swelling around the knee cap (‘puffy’ knees)
  • Loss of muscle bulk in your quadriceps (front thigh muscles)

What causes it?

A number of issues can cause runner’s knee. It’s often something that comes on gradually and people endure for some time before seeking help, so often, by the time a runner comes to see us there are a few things going on and compensations have developed. Problems that can contribute to runners knee include:

  • Overworking the patellofemoral joint (joint between knee cap and thigh bone)
  • Stiff hip joints
  • Over pronation at the foot (flattened arches
  • Tight hamstrings, calf and quadriceps muscles
  • Lack of strength in quadriceps  muscles
  • Issues around the glutes and pelvis

What can Physio do to help? 

To settle the pain and discomfort of your knee pain, you can rest and use ice and painkillers. Rest is crucial, as the problems is often a result of  overuse, so reducing activity will help this. However, if you’re like most runners, you aren’t going to be keen on resting for long.

As with any overuse injury (read a previous blog about overuse injuries here), it is crucial to identify the cause of the problem. This is where physio comes in, as we’ll be able to identify exactly where the cause of the problem lies and address it. This may be through a tailored exercise programme to strengthen, stabilise and stretch particular areas around your knee, hips or pelvis. It could be that you’d benefit from orthotics and if so we can assess your need and advise accordingly. Or it may be an issue with your running technique, training programme, running shoes or other activity you’re doing.

In combination with addressing the underlying issue, we provide relief of your symptoms to make you feel more comfortable. This could be through hands on physio techniques to release soft tissues, acupuncture, electrotherapy or taping. We have a huge range of techniques and tools that can help you.

Most importantly, we’ll guide you back to doing what you love to do and that’s run! We make sure you know when to start running again without re-injuring yourself, it’s a difficult balance. We advise on distance, timing, rest, speed and making sure you are progressing your specific exercises to support your recovery.


Sports Injury Clinic at goPhysio – How We Can Help

Posted on 11th August 2016 by

Whether you’re a weekend warrior, serious athlete or occasional runner, keeping active plays a vital part in living a long and healthy life. However, injury is often an unfortunate consequence of being involved in sports.

We understand how frustrating it can be, not being able to do what you love to do because of pain or injury. If you’re unfortunate enough to sustain an injury, however, you can be assured that at goPhysio, most injuries can be addressed easily and quickly, minimising your recovery time. We solve your injury problems and concerns, getting you better quickly and returning you to sport, free from pain.

Our holistic ‘goPhysio Way’ approach ensures that while treating your injury with ‘hands on’ physiotherapy, we also detect and correct any defects or faulty movement patterns with performance-focused rehabilitation. We not only resolve your symptoms but we aim also to enhance your long-term sporting performance and prevent future issues.

Our physios are energetic and positive people who actively partake in a range of sports themselves, from cross country running to triathlons, kite surfing to skiing. We have a wide range of clinical, professional and personal experience to make sure your treatment is tailored to your individual goals.

Why chose a Physio to treat your sports injury?

As Physio’s we’re movement & exercise specialists. We’re the profession of choice for sports teams and athletes worldwide to help the best achieve their best. You deserve the best too and that’s what we aim to offer you here at goPhysio.

Common injuries we treat here at goPhysio include:

But whatever your sports or activity, we use our expertise skills and knowledge to help you recover and get back to what you want to be doing, fast.

To make an appointment you can book online or give us a call on 023 8025 3317. We’re always at hand to offer free advice to help guide you in making your decision who you need to see to help you.