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Recover from injury faster with POLICE

Posted on 30th June 2016 by

R.I.C.E. or P.R.I.C.E. principles are well known ways to help treat an acute soft tissue injury, such as a sprain, strain or bruise, in the early days. The acronym stands for rest, ice, compression, elevation.

However, what’s not so widely known is that in recent years, the R. (Rest) element has been replaced with O.L. (Optimal Loading).

Why the change? 

Some rest initially can be beneficial, immediately after suffering an injury, but only for a very short period of time. What research shows is that early mobilisation (loading) stresses tissues in the correct manner for full recovery, whereas rest can actually impair optimal recovery of soft tissue injuries. Too much rest and you’ll quickly develop joint stiffness and muscle weakness.

Some injuries may require some ‘Protection’ such as using crutches for a few days, just to take the weight off a severe ankle injury, or a splint or brace for a wrist, ankle or knee. This will help to unload the injury enough to avoid further aggravation but still allow tissue stress to help with healing. But use of such protection should be minimised as inevitably you won’t be loading the area if it’s totally protected.

The hard part of this is correctly identify what exactly constitutes ‘Optimal Loading’, as it is different for different tissues and body parts. You can often use common sense, don’t be afraid to move and use the injured area within your own limits of pain. A mild pain is to be expected but anything more and you’re probably doing too much. You need to make sure that you keep progressing what you are doing, as this will help your injury heal better and longer term help prevent re-injury.

This is where seeking help from a Physio is great. A physiotherapist will combine their knowledge of the stages of healing with what you should and shouldn’t be doing to ‘load’ your healing tissues. They will give you a tailored and progressive exercise programme to make sure the healing tissues are given the optimal chance of long term recovery.

POLICE Principle Injury Treatment

As with any injury, always seek medical advice if you are worried or concerned or want to get it checked out before starting any self directed management.

Some of the research: 

PRICE needs updating, shall we call the POLICE?

What Is the Evidence for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation Therapy in the Treatment of Ankle Sprains in Adults?


10 Ways to Keep Your Neck Pain Under Control

Posted on 29th June 2016 by

Neck pain is a very common complaint. We see dozens of people every week at our clinic in Chandlers Ford, suffering from various degrees of neck pain. Rarely is it very serious and there are very effective treatments that we can use to help resolve the problem quickly.

Whilst physiotherapy treatment can help neck pain very effectively, it is very important that you learn to help control and manage the problem yourself too or better still, take steps to help prevent it occurring in the first place.

Here are some things to consider:

  1. Sustained poor postures can cause and re-aggravate neck pain. Learn how to maintain a good posture during common activities such as reading, watching TV, sleeping and working. This will reduce neck strain. More importantly, don’t stay in any one position for too long – shuffle and move about. It’s sustaining one position for lengthy periods of time that can cause neck issues.
  2. Overuse can over-stress the neck structures. Performing the same activity repetitively is unwise. Try to break up and vary your activity from time to time. Examples when overuse can be a problem include painting, writing, gardening, practising your sport (e.g. tennis, golf), lifting & work activities.
  3. Poor muscle control in your neck may lead to fatigue and overuse of other muscles in the area. Strengthening your neck muscles can help you control your neck problem. We will always provide you with an exercise programme designed specifically for you to help strengthen the right muscles if needed.
  4. Treatment can often help if you’ve got neck pain. Arrange to see someone when problems arise or if your neck begins to deteriorate. Don’t leave it until problems become severe. Some people find a regular massage can be helpful.
  5. Heat & massage are useful self treatment techniques. Heat & massage often helps ease muscle spasm or tension.
  6. Regular breaks are important. Try to divide your activities into small chunks and have breaks in between. Performing gentle stretches and range of movement exercises (as advised by your physio) can be very useful during these breaks. Also, get up and walk around regularly.
  7. Your chair is very important. Make sure you have a good chair for work, study or when at the computer. Your chair should have a good lower back support, height adjustment and adjustable arm rest. You could even think about having a height adjustable desk so that you vary your work between sitting and standing.
  8. Computer height is important. The monitor should be at eye level and not too far away. You shouldn’t have to twist your neck to use your computer. You should have a document holder, good light and the keyboard should be at elbow level. Your physio can provide specific guidelines about setting up your workstation properly.
  9. Avoid tension whilst working. When you are tense or you are over using the wrong muscles it will put increased stress on your neck. An example of this tension is when you shrug your shoulders and hold this position. You will feel the tension in your neck. When you relax from this ‘shrugged’ position and let your shoulders drop down and relax. This reduces the tension. Learn to relax those ‘shoulder-neck’ muscles.
  10. Improve your neck flexibility. Reduce neck stiffness by stretching tight neck muscles and joints. A stiff neck is less able to withstand strain and loading. Have your physio show you what exercises are best for you.

If you’re suffering with neck problems and want to take control, get in touch with us at goPhysio – we can carry out a full assessment to help you understand your neck issues and create a bespoke recovery plan to not only relieve your symptoms but give you long lasting recovery. If you need any advice, give us a call on 023 8025 3317 or you can book an appointment online.

Here are some general neck exercises that are great to help ward off neck pain.

Neck Exercises and Tension Relief

 


Diastasis Recti – Separation of tummy muscles

Posted on 28th June 2016 by

We see a large number of pregnant ladies and new Mum’s at goPhysio. Physiotherapist, Kim, is specially trained to treat common conditions that occur during the ante and post natal periods. One thing that we’re seeing a lot of at the moment, is ladies suffering with separated tummy muscles, more formally known as ‘Diastasis Recti’.

What is a Diastasis Recti?

A diastasis recti is a separation of the outer layer of your superficial abdominal muscles, which can often occur in pregnancy (although non-pregnant people can get it too). Sometimes it is called an abdominal separation or tummy muscle separation.

Diastasis Recti goPhysio

The linea alba is a line of connective tissue that normally joins the two halves of your Rectus Abdominis muscles together. It doesn’t have as much stretch as the muscles around it – this means that under increasing pressure (like a growing baby), it can come apart, resulting in a separation of the muscles.

Is it common?

Around two thirds of women will have a diastasis recti after pregnancy. It can also occur in the non-pregnant population – usually due to a significant trauma or change in internal or external abdominal pressure.

Women over the age of 35, have had multiple pregnancies, large babies or multiple births, such as twins/triplets, are all at an increased risk. Shorter women can also be more at risk as they don’t always have as much space in their abdomen to accommodate the growing baby as someone taller!

You may see your tummy muscles ‘dome’ as you try and sit forwards, you may actually feel a gap in your abdominal muscles or see a hollow. All of these can be signs of a separation in your tummy muscles.

Does it cause other problems?

It can do – a weak core can put additional strain on your back muscles and might lead to back pain or stiffness. A large diastasis can also cause your abdominal contents to push forwards as they don’t have the support of the muscles to hold them in place.

Can it be fixed?

Yes! But you need to be very careful in how you address this issue – crunches, sit ups and planks will only make the problem worse. You need to slowly heal the damaged connective tissue of the Linea Alba and not over work or strain the area, as this could cause further separation of the muscles. The weaker the connective tissue and the wider the gap, the longer it is likely to take to heal. In some instances surgery is required to repair there gap, although this is very rare. The key is doing the right things to address the separation and help it heal.

It’s important to see a qualified Physiotherapist who can advise you on the severity of your diastasis and exercises to start improving and strengthening the core muscles.


New Online Booking Facility – Making An Appointment Just Got Easier

Posted on 27th June 2016 by

Today we launch a new online booking facility. You can use this to book appointments for:

It’s much more user friendly than our old system. You just need to register online, select what type of appointment you need, select a practitioner (if you have a preference) and find a day and time slot that suits you best.

Not all our appointments are available online, so if you can’t see a convenient appointment then give us a call. We aim to be as accommodating as possible.

Take a look at our new online booking system and book your appointment today!

online booking


We are looking for a part time Administrator and Receptionist to join our team

Posted on 27th June 2016 by

We are looking for an experienced receptionist and administrator to work at our private goPhysio Receptionist Positionphysiotherapy clinic in Chandlers Ford.

Key Responsibilities include:

  • Greeting all visitors in the clinic
  • Making and changing bookings in person and on the phone
  • Assisting the clinicians to help run their diary efficiently
  • Taking payments and assisting with invoicing and accounts management
  • Patient related administration such as letters, emails and database management
  • Stock management

Skills, Experience and Qualifications required:

  • Customer service experience essential
  • Experience in the health care sector an advantage
  • Confident with Microsoft Office and learning new IT skills (we use a computerised practice management system)
  • Friendly and caring attitude

goPhysio is a well established, family business in Chandlers Ford. We help local people live a healthy, active, positive life, pain and injury free by offering expert physiotherapy at our private clinic. In addition to physio, we also offer a range of supportive services such as Pilates, chiropody, sports massage and custom orthotics.

We have a great small team, and offer a friendly and supportive working environment. We have high expectations of our team and are looking for someone who is dedicated, hard working with a friendly and caring attitude, that help’s make our customers feel truly welcome.

This is a part time position, 10 hours/week initially. The hours will be Fridays 1pm – 6pm and Saturdays 8am – 1pm. There may be opportunity for further permanent hours in the future, as we are relocating later this year to a bigger premises in Chandlers Ford and expanding our services.

In addition to the regular 10 hours/week, as an essential part of the job you will also be required to cover reception staff holidays up to 20 hours a week, covering 4-6 weeks/year when the other receptionist is on annual leave. This will include evening work to 8pm.

If you’re interested in the position, please send your CV and a covering letter to fiona@gophysiotherapy.co.uk by Thursday 30th June 2016.


Could acupuncture help you recover from injury?

Posted on 16th June 2016 by

All of our Physiotherapists are experienced at using acupuncture as part of their physiotherapy treatment. They have undertaken rigorous post graduate training and education in the safe and effective use of acupuncture. If you think acupuncture may help you, get in touch to find out more.

Acupuncture for pain relief at goPhysio


Top 10 Bike Maintenance Tips

Posted on 16th June 2016 by

 

A bike is a great investment and with the right tlc, can last many years. The Bike Week website has ike Week 2016written their top 10 bike maintenance tips, easy to do, not too laborious but could go a long way in extending the life of your cycle. Here’s their tips:

1. Keep it clean
If there is one thing you can do to prolong the life of your bike, it is keeping it clean. Tedious, but true. No fancy cleaning kit required – a bucket of soapy water, a sponge and an old toothbrush is all you need, though a proper degreaser will help break down the oil and grit in the chain and gear sprockets.

2. Keep your tyres inflated properly
Poorly inflated tyres are prone to punctures. Forget flimsy hand pumps – you need a standing track pump with a pressure gauge to do the job. Nice bike shops will let you borrow theirs. Look on the side of your tyre for a number followed by the letters PSI. That tells you how much air to put in.

3. Check your brake pads
Worn brake pads equal rubbish brakes. You can tell they are worn if you can hardly see the grooves any more. Fitting new brake pads is a very cheap and easy fix and any number of websites can show you how. You just need a set of Allen keys and some patience.

4. Silence squeaky brakes
Screeching brakes are often dirty brakes, or at least dirty wheel rims. Clean and dry both properly and 50% of the time, you’ve solved the problem. If that doesn’t work, they might need adjusting.

5. Tighten saggy brakes
Britain’s Biggest Bike Fix. If your brakes have become sluggish and lacklustre – i.e. if you squeeze the brake lever and it moves more than halfway towards the handlebars – you need to tighten them up. The easiest way to do this is twiddle the barrel adjuster by the brake lever. If that doesn’t do the trick, you’ll need to get your Allen keys out and free the brake cable by opening the brake nut, pulling it taut and closing the nut again. Again, let the internet be your teacher.

6. Get a professional service
Once a year should be fine, ideally at the start of spring if you’ve been brave enough to cycle though winter. There is no shame in getting the pros in. Think of it as your bicycle MOT. Or why not bring your bike to your local Bike Week and have a Dr Bike check up?

7. Lubrication, lubrication, lubrication
Buy some bike-specific lubricant and use it sparingly on any parts of your bike where metal touches metal. There is no point oiling your chain unless you have cleaned it properly first – you’ll make matters worse.

8. Check if your wheel is “true”
Turn your bike upside down and spin your wheels. Do they wobble a little from side to side? If so, they need “truing”. This is a quick fix, but not one for an amateur, as you need special equipment. A bike shop will do this for a small fee.

9. Get your saddle perfect
If you are prone to SBS (sore bum syndrome), experiment a little with your saddle, raising or tilting it slightly to suit your riding style. If you get sore knees while cycling, you might have your saddle too low. When you pedal, your legs should be almost straight on the downwards revolution.

10. Buy some latex gloves
Bike oil is a nightmare to get out from under your nails. If it’s too late for that, scrub your hands with washing up liquid and sugar, only adding water right at the end.


Teaching Your Child to Ride A Bike in 30 Minutes

Posted on 13th June 2016 by

Learning to ride a bike is a huge childhood milestone. By the time we were on our third child, we’d nailed it! But teaching our first and second were quite a challenge at times. Given that this week is Bike Week, I thought I’d share my own tips and this great little video, which certainly echoes my positive experience teaching my third child to ride a bike.

My Top Tips

  • Get them on a balance bike as soon as they’re ready – they’ll learn how to balance and stay upright on 2 wheels, without having to think about pedals.
  • Encourage them to use the balance bike little and often, short bursts going from A to B are great. They’ll pick it up in no time.
  • Don’t use stabilisers, the positioning of the bike isn’t the same as without, which is confusing with little ones when you try and get rid of them.
  • Get a lightweight bike that’s proportioned to the child. I absolutely rave about Isla Bikes and have also heard good things about Frog bikes.
  • Lead by example, start family bike rides early (with baby in a bike seat) and cycling will just become a normal part of their life.
  • Choose flat, smooth surfaces to first try with a pedal bike. St James Park in Shirley has a great looping path, as does Southampton Common. But there are many options in the area.

From my experience, it literally took less than 10 minutes to go from a balance bike to a pedal cycle with my third when she was about 4 and she’d been on a balance bike since she was 2. It was such a simple, natural transition and a pleasure and joy to watch!

Cycling is a great family activity, and one that you can get even the youngest family members involved in from quite early on. While I’m on the subject of family cycling, I thought I’d also share my child bike seat recommendation. Again, you’ve learnt by the third time round! We found the Weeride bike seat, which sits between the handle bars and cyclist (rather than behind the cyclist), to be amazing. When they’re stuck at the back, the bike often feels heavy and unbalanced and you have no interaction with them. Using the Weeride, the bike feels so much more stable and you can involve them in your cycle and chat to them as you go. They can also see what’s going on really well. We used this right up until our 3rd child was about 4 and it was a great experience.

#BikeWeekUK

 


Why Is Rehabilitation Pilates different to other Pilates Classes?

Posted on 12th June 2016 by

Pilates classes are a big part of what we offer here at goPhysio in Chandlers Ford. However, the Pilates classes we run at goPhysio are a little different to others you may experience in the area. Our Pilates is in essence ‘Rehabilitation Pilates’.

Rehabilitation Pilates is different to a traditional class you may attend at the gym or local hall.

Physio Pilates Chandlers FordRehabilitation Pilates has been specifically developed for use by physiotherapists.  All of our instructors are both Charted Physiotherapists and are trained by the Australian Physiotherapy and Pilates Institute (APPI), which is the world leader in rehabilitation Pilates.

Rehabilitation Pilates exercises target the deep postural muscles of the tummy and spine to improve central ‘core stability’ & posture. They also help improve spinal mobility, increase flexibility of the key trunk and leg muscle groups and improve body and postural awareness. This type of Pilates is particularly suitable for you if you suffer with back or neck pain or have suffered a specific injury. It is also a great way of preventing injuries or preparing for sport.

People who come along to our Pilates classes tend to fall into one of 5 categories:

  1. They’ve had an injury and have been seeing us for Physiotherapy. Once they are nearing recovery, they start with Pilates to both continue their recovery and help improve their physical ability to stop the injury coming back.
  2. They have been advised to start Pilates by another health care practitioner (e.g. Consultant or GP) and want to join a Physio led class to make sure they have the right support in the class and adequately experienced Instructor.
  3. They’ve suffered with back or neck pain (or other injuries) on and off for years and have heard Pilates is great to stop it re-occurring.
  4. They’ve been to another Pilates class elsewhere but felt that the class size was too big and they weren’t getting enough attention or support from the instructor. We even have people who’ve picked up an injury at other classes from doing Pilates incorrectly.
  5. They’ve just heard wonderful things about Pilates and want to experience the benefits too in a friendly, supportive environment!

As our instructors are also Physiotherapist, you have ‘on hand’ expertise ready to share their knowledge and advice at every class. They have such an extensive knowledge of the human body and also injury, so can tailor each class to the individual needs and make sure you really get the most out of it for you. The classes only ever have a maximum of 8 participants, so you are always under the watchful eye to make sure you’re doing the exercises correctly and be progressed when needed.

We also run 2 specialist Pilates classes for pregnant ladies and also new mums and their babies.

There is a real skill in getting the Pilates exercises right and this needs concentration, guidance and attention.

Take a look at our class timetable to see the classes we run at goPhysio.

Questions we’re often asked about our classes

How many people come to the Pilates classes? The numbers for each class are strictly limited to a maximum of 8. This is to ensure that we maintain a high quality class, with the instructor being able to give sufficient attention & support to each individual.

How do I book onto a Pilates class? If you want to join our classes you can give us a call at the clinic on 02380253317 or email us. We’ll help find the most suitable class for you, we’ll can chat through the booking process and organise payment for the class. Alternatively, If you are currently attending goPhysio, chat to your Physio or our Reception team, who can organise for you to attend a class.

How much do the classes cost? We normally run our courses in 8 week blocks. The cost of each 8 week course is £100.

Why do I need a 1-2-1 before I start Pilates? We do advocate that if you haven’t seen us at goPhysio before you have a 30 minute 1-to-1 pilates session, before joining a class. This will enable our Pilates Instructor to help you to get 110% out of your Pilates! This is norma;l procedure for anyone starting a Physio led Pilates course. These 1-2-1 appointments cost £35.

Pilates Classes Chandlers Ford


Physiotherapy For Cycling Injuries

Posted on 11th June 2016 by

Bike Week 2016This week is Bike Week, which aims to inspire more people to take to 2 wheels.

Cycling is a wonderful way to exercise, whatever your level or age. It’s great for cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, flexibility and has a host of health benefits.

It’s a safe form of exercise and is often a great way to start fit if you need to maintain your fitness with a lower impact activity. It’s also a fab way to incorporate exercise into a mode of travel!

However, like many forms of exercise, cycling can become a source of injuries. Cycling injuries tend to fall into 2 camps, either a traumatic injury or an overuse injury.

Traumatic Injuries – these are caused by some sort of trauma. This is normally a fall or collision and can be very minor to severe. Traumatic injuries are often accidents that can’t be avoided, but you can take precautions. These include:

  • Wearing appropriate protective clothing such as a helmet
  • Being up to date with bike maintenance to make sure you bike is in top working order
  • Knowing and reading the weather conditions and environment to make sure they fit with your plans
  • Understanding your personal limitations and being realistic with your ability. Many accidents occur when people are pushing themselves unrealistically.

Common traumatic cycling injuries include:

  • Fractures – often the clavicle (collar bone) or scaphoid (wrist) as you put your arm out to protect you as you fall.
  • Bruising – to the muscle and/or bone. This is as a result of falling directly onto the area, often a prominent bony area such as the outside of the hip.

Overuse Injuries – as the name implies, are caused when a part of the body is being ‘overused’ and can’t cope with the physical demands being placed upon it. Cycling is a very repetitive activity, an average cyclist might perform well over 5,000 revolutions an hour. The human body has a threshold of what it will tolerate and sometimes it just can’t cope with prolonged repetitive demands being placed on it. This is when an overuse injury rears it’s head.

The problem with overuse injuries is that they often start gradually as a tiny niggle that you ignore. Before you know it that niggle is a regular occurrence but you think it will just go away just as it appeared. Then it eventually becomes really annoying and can actually becomes so severe it stops you doing the things you love and that may have caused it in the first place, which is even more of a pain!

You can take steps to avoid or minimise the impact of cycling overuse injuries. These include:

  • Make sure your bike is set up correctly. This is crucial given the repetitive nature of cycling. Very small adjustments such as saddle and handlebar height can make a huge difference.
  • Increase your cycling gradually. Whether its speed, distance or hills – don’t do too much all at once. You need to give your body time to adapt and adjust to the demands being placed upon it.
  • Listen to your body. If you feel a little niggle, hold back a bit until it eases off to give your body chance to recover.
  • Seek advice at the right time. If a niggle is becoming more than that, it’s better to come and see us sooner rather than later. Overuse injuries that are ignored can often become long term problems and then they’re much harder to resolve and take longer to recover.

Common cycling overuse injuries include:

  • Back pain – which is often related to your posture on the bike and easily resolved by changing your bike set up.
  • Neck pain – again, this is often posture related and being more aware of your posture and position on the bike can be really helpful.
  • Knee pain – including tendonopathies, patellofemoral pain (front of knee) or ITB problems (side of knee).
  • Foot or ankle problems – such as achilles tendonopathy or forefoot pain from the pressure of peddling.

As Physio’s we’re highly skilled at identifying and resolving all the injury issues that may arise from cycling. Many of our team are keen cyclists themselves, so can truly identify with what you’re experiencing. If you are suffering with an injury as a result of cycling, give us a call to see how we can help you and get you back on your bike! #BikeWeekUK


Read more about Physiotherapy for Cycling Injuries on the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists website.